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Full text of "Mining and Scientific Press (1875)"

o 200? isaEin 4 

California State L ,L 




CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY 

SACRAMENTO 



This book is due on the last date stamped 
below. Books may not be renewed. 



B0601-610 4-77 40M ® OSP 



*:> \ *o> N. 



\ 




An Illustrated Journal of 



BV i>ic\vi-:y ^ OOJ 
I'ut «->nt Solicitor*. 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY. JANUARY 2, 1875. 



VOLUME XXX 
3\»mil>oi* 1. 



Improved Current Water Wheel. 

The uu aus of utilizing th" pow, r afforded by 
the current of u river, where sufficient full can- 
not be obtained to rnn u turbine wheel success 
fnlly, have been brought to comparative perfec- 
tion wiihiu a few yean by the improvements 
which have been made in this class of device-*. 
Necessarily, where even the beat form of cur- 
rent wheel is used, the application of the power 
of the stream is made in but an imperfect de- 
gree an regards economy, a largo proportion of 
it running to waste, and only the effect of the 
water directly in contact with 
the wheel being gained; but 
as no other expense than 
that of constructing and set- 
ting the wheel is incurred» 
the investment is often a 
very profitable one. To ob~ 
tain nil the power which the 
volume of water in the stream 
would afford would require 
the building of a dam, and 
consequently the employ- 
ment of capital, frequently 
to a very liberal extent, in 
securing the primary facili- 
ties for doing business; and 
where this capital is not at 
command, or a large business 
is noL contemplated, an am- 
ple return may bo realized 
on a moderate investment by 
putting in a enrrent wheel 
of the most approved con- 
struction. Such a wheel is 
illustrated in the accompa- 
nying engraving, which 
shows a basin made in the 
bank at right angles wiih 
the stream, ilR sirieH being 
protected by planking, for 
which stone may be substi- 
tuted, if cheaper or more 
convenient. In this basin 
floats the raft which carries 
the wheel, the frame of the 
raft being so made as to bal- 
ance the weight of the wheel. 
The basin or slip is dug 
deep enough to float the raft 
and wheel at low water, and 
extends into the bank a dis- 
tance equal to the length of 
the whole apparatus, which 
may thus be drawn back en- 
tirely out of the current. 
This is a point of special 
value, as by means of this 
arrangement the wheel and * 

raft can be withdrawn out of reach of drift 
wood and thus be protected from injury 
when the stream is swollen by heavy rain or 
melting snows, 

The wheel, which is an undershot, is shown 
projecting into the current and in operation, 
its motion being communicated through the 
gearing A, to the horizontal shaft B. On this 
shaft slides a loose pulley, C, having on the 
left hand side of its hub an annualar recess and 
a clutch, by which, when desired, it is engage^ 
with the shaft B. The annualar recess receiv e8 
one end of the shipper lever D, the other e n & 
of which is made fast on the bank, and by 
means of a hinge the lever is rendered adapi a _ 
ble to the position of the raft at any stage of 
water. The shaft E, which is rotated by a 
wheel at one end as shown, has chains wound 
around it, leading to the opposite ends of the 
raft; and thus, by turning the wheel toward 
the bank, the raft is drawn in, while by turn- 
ing in the other direction it is moved out into 
the stream. "When the raft is run out, the 
Wheel is held in position by a pawl whieh 
drops into a recess in the thaft E. The rollers 
F, on the sides of the raft only one of which 
is shown in the engraving, facilitate the mov- 
ing of the raft by their contact with the plank- 



ing of the baeia, preventing the friction which 
would result from the raft being forced by the 
. i. hi against the side of the slip. 

It will be Been that when the rift is move 1 
out, the lever D will draw the crutch into ac- 
tion, and the motion of the shaft 11, received 
from the water wheel, will be transmitted 
through the lnoso pulley, C, and its belt to the 
machinery of the mill. On the other hand, 
when the raft is drawn in, the IcverD, remain- 
ing rigid, will push th^ parts of the clutch 
asunder and the loose pulley will cease to turn. 
By this arrangement, the same appliances by 
which the raft is moved in and out serve to 
regulate the transmission of power and the 
starting and stopping of the machinery. 



Mere Rain Wanted. 

The immediate want of rain is not urgent, 
according to such information as we can ob- 
tiin from correspondents, exchanges aud other 
sources, but serious apprehensions are looming 
up in connection with the prospect of a dry 
winter which many now predict. We have no 
sympathy with croakers; and one of the re- 
groU growing out of the present nnhopefoi as- 
pect of the season, is a sort of mortification at 
thesutis'ac'ion which these evil prophets man- 
ifest over the seeming truthfulness of their pre- 




McCAETY'S CURRENT WATER WHEEL. 



Any additional information concerning this 
improvement may be obtained of the inventor 
aud patentee, Mr. M. McCarty, Pueblo, Col. 

The Sacramento "Union" Sold. — The Sacra, 
mento Union, according to previous announce- 
ment, was sold to the highest bidder,' in the 
street in front of that office, on Monday last. 
There were but two bidders Messrs. Larkin, 
(who was the party desiring to sell out) 'and 
Mr. Morrill, who represented the remaining 
interest. The first offer was $50,000, which 
was followed by $60,000; $02,500 and $65,000 
at which latter price it was knocked down to 
Morrill, who represented the majority interest 
in the proprietorship. Hence the paper will 
be continued without any change in (he man- 
ner or tone of its management. 

Wisconsin is the latest location of our East- 
ern mining excitement Two California miners 
are reported as having struck a quartz lead there 
which assays $1,700 to the ton. Those two 
California miners may fool some of the Wiscon- 
sin people into buying the whole thing on the 
basis of $1,700 per ton, and do well with the 
claim. 



dictions. It will be remembered that on the 
appearance of the first rains of the season, 
which were unusually early and copious, fears 
were entertained that they would be followed 
by a dry winter; and at the present time there 
is, it must be confessed, too near a prospect of 
those fears being realized. 

"While we do not believe in gauging our op- 
era'.ions or allowing our feelings to be Bwayed 
by the predictions of those who are continually 
prophesying evil, we are not disposed to close 
our eyes to anything that is so near an approach 
to disaster as the present scarcity of rain ren- 
ders imminent. We might as well face the mu- 
sic at once, as to wait until the din becomes 
confusing. 

In many localities in the mining districts, the 
weather is too cold to work anyhow, In other 
places they were not quite ready at the time of 
the last storm ; but have their claims all pre- 
pared to go ahead on now. Most of the miners 
are hopeful of a good water season, and a plen- 
tiful harvest of yellow dust. It is to be hoped 
that a good supply of snow wilt store itself up 
on the mountains for summer use, so that the 
ditches and pipes will run full until late in the 
seas ok. 



Rosita Mining District. 

The Rosita or Hardt*crabble mining district 
is located in the southwestern part of Fremont 
county, Colorado, aud is one of the most ac- 
csssible silver nvuing districts in Southern 
Colorado, being fifty miles southwest frow 
Pueblo, and 30 milessinth of Canon City. The 
communication wi^h both places is made over 
excellent wagon roads. 

W. H. Holmes kindly sends usths following 
information concerning this district: The min- 
ing town of Rosita is the center of the rich- 
est miue^ that cover the 
surrounding bills in every 
direction. It has apopula- 
tion of 500— mos'ly mi- 
ners — and contains three 
hotels, four stores, school 
and "meeting house." It is 
a wide awake, growing 
town and one of the most 
orderly and respectable min- 
ing communities in the Ter- 
ritory. Rosita is at an alti- 
tude of 8600 feet above the 
level of the s?a, being situ- 
ated on the southwestern 
slope of the Wet mountain 
range, and protected by the 
mountains from the prevail- 
ing winds. The wintera 
here are mild, the tempera* 
ture corresponding with 
that of Denver, 150 miles 
farther north, Mining can 
be prosecuted here during 
the entire winter. 

The first work on these 
mines began about two 
yeais ago. Since that time 
the work of prospecting 
and developing tuese mines 
has gone steadily on, though 
for the want of capital the 
development of some of the 
best mines has progressed 
slowly. Capital for the de- 
velopment of these mines 
and the erec'.ion of reduc- 
tion works at this place 
for the treatment of the 
lower grade ores is greatly 
needed. The best authori- 
ties on mines in the Ter- 
ritory have stated that the 
precio.us metal here will 
undoubtedly develop it into 
one of the richest silver 
mining districts in Colorado. 
Prof. Hayden aud Lieuten- 
ant Wheeler's parties visited this district 
during the summers of 1873 and 74, and give 
the most favorable report of them. 

The veins throughout the district are well 
defined, and show high grade silver ore, speci- 
men assays running up from $35 to $15,000 
per ton, notwithstanding that 100 feet is the 
greatest depth to which any shaft has been 
sunk. Several mines are now shipping ore 
to Black Hawk, Golden and other points that 
sells for $300 to $400 per ton. It is reported 
that some of it sells for a much higher sum. 



Joe Sealey, Deputy County Surveyor for 
Inyo county, is engaged in chaining and map- 
ping a road from Panamint via Darwin city 
aud New Coso, to the point of connection with 
the Cerro Gordo and Lone Pine road at 
Swansea. 



The improvements now going forward at the 
Savage hoisting works are being pushed to 
completion with all speed. They are of a sub- 
stantial character, like all the improvements 
made about the mines of late years. 

Within the past few weeks $100,000 has been 
invested in the mines of Bingham, Utah, by 
California parties. 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS, 



[January 2, 1875. 



The Big Mill. 

About three - months ago the Consolidated 
Virginia mine, on the Comstock, commenced 
the erection, in connection with their hoisting 
works, .of an immense steam mill, for the 
reduction of silver ore. It is the largest steam 
silver mill on the coast, and from the complete- 
ness of its arrangements and its conveniences 
for handling and reducing ores, it will be found 
to excel more in capacity than in size and 
dimensions and the number of the stamps. 
The Virginia Independent, in describing this big 
mill, says : The ground where the mill stands 
is admirably adapted to its present uses. The 
site is to the north and east of the hoisting 
works, and between the two the descent is 
such that the ore can be run from the level of 
the surface of the hoisting works, and reach 
the mill at its very pinnacle. The ground 
covered by the mill also descends very rapid'y 
to the east, so that the ore falls naturally to 
the stamps; from the stamps, by distributing 
sluices, the pulp drops to the tanks, from the 
tanks to the pans, and so on down by a gradual 
descent to the agitator room. Some idea of 

The Dimensions of the Mill 
May be gained from the following particulars : 
The battery building is 110 feet long, by 48 feet 
wide; the pan building is 195 feet long by 92 
feet wide; the engine room is 58 feet by 92 feet, 
and the retort house 25 feet by GO feet, the 
whole covering over 26,000 square feet of 
ground. Besides these buildings there is an 
office 20 by 30 feet, fronting on G street. 

The Engine 
Is a compound condensing, or" low pressure 
engine, of 600 horse power, with cylinders 24 
by 48 and 48 by 48 inches respectively. The 
steam is admitted into the 24 by 48 cylinder 
and cut off at the half stroke. It is then taken 
into the expansion cylinder, which is 48 by 48, 
and oontains four times the cubical contents of 
the smaller one, and thus an expansion of eight 
times is gained. After leaving the expansiou 
cylinder the steam exhausts into tho condenser. 
This gives the vacuum power or the power 
resulting from the atmospheric pressure at this 
altitude in addition to the expansive power of 
the steam. 

The Engine Shaft 
Is 14 inches in diameter, and carries a band 
wheel 18 feet in diameter, weighing 33,000 
pounds, which drives the battery part of the 
works. This shaft itself weighs 15,000 pounds, 
and the approximate weight of the whole 
engine is 100,000 pounds, or 50 tons. The 
foundation of this ponderous piece of machin- 
ery contains 450 cubic yards of masonry, laid 
in cement, and weighs 600 tons. This engine 
shaft is coupled to an extension 11 inches in 
diameter, which drives the amalgamating part 
of the works. 

The Boilers, Etc. 
The boilers which supply this monstrous 
motive power with steam, cousist of four pairs, 
54 inches by 16 feet, so arranged as to run a 
single pair at a time, or all together. The 
smoke-stacks are 42 inches in diameter, and 
stand 90 feet from the ground. There are also, 
in connection with the boilers, two steam 
pumps, for feed and fire purposes; to these a 
water-hose is constantly attached and ready 
for use in case of fire. The roof of the engine 
room rises to the hight of 50 feet; the western 
earth or embankment wall is 22 feet high, 
built of hewn trachyte rock, and, with the 
other embankment walls, contains 4,000 
perch of stone, We will now commence and 
trace 

The Ore from the Mine through the Mill. 
The mill is connected with the hoisting 
works by means of a covered trestlework, 44 
feet in hight at the mill end. The same cars 
used in the mine will be run in trains by mule 
power from the mine, 278 feet to the mill. The 
trains will consist of from six to ten cars. It 
will take a car-load every five minutes to sup- 
ply the demands of the mill. These cars are 
dumped into shutes, one on each side the 
center, from which the fine ore sifts into the 
ore bins below. The part of the ore first 
dumped is carried back from the center by 
shutes, and thus becomes equally distributed 
into the feed bins. From the feed bins the ore 
is taken by Tulloch's self-feeders and given to 
the batteries as it is required. 
The Batteries 
Are driven from a oounter shaft propelled by 
the large bund wheel below, the connection 
with which is made by a belt 24 inches wide 
and 160 feet. long. From this counter shaft 
the batteries are driven by 14-inch belts, 60 
feet long, The batteries are run in sets of 10 
stamps each, and clutches are so arranged as to 
stop any ten without interfering with the 
working of the other machinery, The bat- 
.taries consist of 60 stamps of 800 pounds each. 
The mortars are so arranged as not to interfere 
with pntting shoes and dies into the lotteries, 
as they discharge at one side and are two 
nearly together instead of separately and in the 
center. From eaoh division of 30 stamps there 
are 

Distributing Sluices 
"Which convey the pulp into the settling tanks. 
From the tanks it is shoveled out upon the 
platform in front of the pans. There are 16 
pans on each side. These are flat-bottomed, 3 
feet in diameter and calculated to hold about 
two tons each. The pans have steam bottoms, 



aud are arranged to admit live steam into the 
pulp or under the bottom. There is a settler to 
each pair of pans, making 8 on each side. 
These are 9 feet in diameter and 3 feet deep. 
From the 15 settlers the pulp is discharged 
into four agitators, and these discharge in turn 
into the tail sluice which is placed at the end 
of all the other appliances. The heavy stuff in 
the agitators will be cleaned out twice every 24 
hours and subjected to further working by four 
more pans and two settlers placed id the agita- 
tor room. 

The Quicksilver 
Tank is placed in the store-room under the 
ore bins, and will come down pipes to the dis- 
tributing tanks in the pan-room. From these 
tanks it will be distributed through pipes to 
the charging bowls of the pans. After passing 
through the pans and settlers it is discharged 
from each settler direct into each strainer. A 
pipe leads from the bottom of each strainer to 
the main receiving tank, which is placed below 
everything and in the center of the pan-room 
to catch all; and from that it is pumped up 
into the main distributing reservoir again. 
There are two of these reservoirs — one on each 
side. 

The Amalgam 
Kemains in the strainers, and is takon by au 
amalgam car, holding about twenty touB, 
which runs through the center of the pan 
building to the retort room. The same car 
takes retorted silver back into the mill circula- 
tion. Each pan and settler can be stopped 
without interfering with the other machinery. 
Each row of pans and battery has a traveling 
tackle for convenience of handling the stamps 
and pan mullers. The strainers are provided 
with locks and covers for protecting the amal- 
gam. 

The Retort Room 
Is built of brick and contains four retorts, each 
of which is calculated to hold 2,000 pounds. 
These are so arranged that any one or more of 
them can be run. The|flues lead into a brick 
chimney fifty feet in hight. Back of the reduc- 
tion works is a 

Cooling Reservoir 

About 200 feet square, where the water from 
the condenser can radiate its heat and attain 
the required temperature to be used again. 
And the controlling mind which mastered all 
these details, and so admirably arranged every* 
thing with an eye to convenience and business 
is 
W. H. Fatten, Designer ant! Superintending 

Engineer 
At the works. He it is who has planned and 
arranged it all. He is the master designer of 
all the vast complications of machinery, all of 
which has been constructed according to his 
directions. The arrangements are ample, yet 
compact. There is no waste room and no 
more room needed. There is no superfluous 
machinery, and none wanted which is not in 
place. Everything is economized, yet of the 
best material and put down to stay. As to the 
quality of materials used, no expense has been 
spared to get-the best. What was needed was 
got. The cost of the mill is about $250,000, 
including the grading. A few years ago it 
would have cost half a million. This economy 
could not have been secured, except Mr. Pattou 
had know just exactly what was wauted, and 
how much of everything would be needed. 

The work will be so far progressed that 
steam will be got up about Christmas, and the 
month of January will see this largest and best 
.silver mill in successful operation. Many a 
whole town on the coast is maintained by the 
prtronage of a much smaller institution. 



The Iowa Hill Canal, 



Mining Theories. 

Kecent developments have set those persons 
who have their peculiar theories about the 
course of tho Comstock lode all at sea. 
Millions of dollars have been expended Jin 
tracing the ledge, and millions more will be 
spent in finding its direction north and south. 
The many-ledge theory which was much in 
vogue in early days, and on which many im- 
portant suits were decided, but which subse- 
quently gave way to the one-ledge theory, is 
being adopted again. Others take the ground 
that several ledges on the surface come together 
like the leaves of a book thousands of feet 
below. Some think that at the divide the 
Comstock breaks into three branches, one ex- 
tending through American flat, one down 
through Gold hill aud another further east. 
Experts from Freiburg, and miners from 
Mexico and Peru, have given their opinions on 
these points on the witness stand, and been 
subjected to a rigid examination, but after the 
cases were submitted the jury knew about as 
much about the question as they did about the 
volcanos in the nioon. In scarcely an instance 
has actual development shown any of the 
theories upon which men staked their reputa- 
tions, and sometimes lost their lives, to have 
been correct. The thousand abandoned pros- 
pecting shafts and tunnels that honeycomb the 
sides of Mount Davidson, Cedar hill and the 
surrounding country for miles, speak for them- 
selves, and show the uncertainty of mining. 
What has been shown by prospecting is known, 
and nothing more. Who knows but that far 
east and west of the present developments rich 
bonanzas exist, which will hereafter be dis- 
covered? Theorizing on croppings and the 
course of ledges is about played out, and ex- 
perienced mining superintendents no longer 
place confidence in what is not in sight. — Vir- 
ginia Chronicle. 



A correspondent writes to the Placer Argus 
giving an account of the season's work on the 
Iowa Hill canal, from which we make the fol- 
lowing extracts: The right of loute is one of 
the best in the State; the cost of construction 
so far, for so large a work, taking as a basis of 
comparison tho figures given in Langley's 
Pacific Coast Directory of all the canals m the 
country, amounting together to over 6,000 
miles, is I am safe in saying, far less than any 
similar work in the State ; tlie water shed is 
simply enormoiis; the expense, of repairs, and 
attendance, from trie favorable character of 
country it passes through, except the upper 
end, will be trifling; the territory it commands 
is inexhaustible in wealth aud extent, for by a 
judicious system of reservoirs, which is the 
cheapest process in the end, the water supply, 
without goiug farther than Sailor and New 
York carious, can be delivered over the whole 
of the upper portion of the county, from Iowa 
hill to Michigan bluffs, in abundance, for 
seven or eight months in the year, aud that is 
long euough. I might with advantage mention 
several more salient points this great work 
possesses over its compeers in other parts of 
the State, only I am afraid of being too 
lengthy. 

As a matter of course, those at a distance 
having an interest in the matter, either pecu- 
niarily or otherwise, will like to hear about the 
progress of the work this season. I believe I 
may say it has been satisfactory in every way. 
I have already expressed through the columns 
of a San Francisco paper the respect I felt for 
the leading men of the company for the vast 
amount of work they have accomplished during 
the first season under the most pressing diffi- 
culties. Financially, the present season has 
been equally harassing; but with true California 
pluck, they kept economically and steadily at 
work, and the results as they stand to-day, 
rather increase my admiration than otherwise. 
The hardest part of their labors is over; the 
remainder is oasy. There are now 26 miles of 
canal, seven feet on the bottom, with reservoir, 
waste gates, and flumes to Tadpole lake, 
complete. The main ditch in its original 
capacity, stops about four miles from town, and 
is thence divided into two branches, somewhat 
smaller, going respectively to Iowa and Wis- 
consin hills, and "covering all the claims on 
either side of Indian canon. Some of these 
claims are now fixing up on an extensive scale, 
having in all cases not less than 500 feet pres- 
sure. 

The main reservoir eight miles from town, 
has been raised from 32 to 50 feet, widened 10 
feet, and extended from hill to hill bounding the 
valley, making the total length of wall 286 
yards. The amount of dirt put in the reser 
voir this season by 10 Chinamen and four 
horses was 17,000 cubic yards, besides doing 
3-i days outside work in the neighborhood. 
Since the horses were drawn off on account of 
storms, a railroad has been put on the entire 
length of the reservoir, and two large cars will 
ba kept running all winter. The track raises 
the wall au additional two feet, so that the en- 
tire available capacity of the reservoir is now 
from 48 to 50 feet of water in depth at the main 
trunk, 286 yards in width, with an oveiflow of 
somewhat over 100 acres. Basing my calcula- 
tions upon the amount of water discharged to 
Judge Spears claim, for six consecutive weeks, 
last season without any supply coming in, I 
make the cash value of such filling about $>7,- 
500. ' Now if as some contend, it can be filled 
four times in an ordinary season, we see at 
once the respectable sum the company will re- 
alize this winter; but whether it can be filled 
four times or not, for I admit there is a differ- 
ence of opinion upon the matter, one thing is 
certain, the company will realize enough to 
place them beyond all external pressure in the 
future. This I mention as a final victory se- 
cured beyond controversey. 

The demand for water this season is about 
5.0U0 inches a day, but the company will not 
attempt to supply more than 3,000. Can they 
really supply this large amount? Let us see. 
On the first of the current month," there were 
25 feet of water in the reservoir, with a daily 
supply of 400 inches, besides 2,000 inches 
turned off at Tadpole, owing to a break in the 
flume at that place, but which will be repaired 
before you receive this letter. Here then in 
solving the question of supply one finds this 
startling fact; in two seasons' work the com- 
pany is in a position on the 1st of December, 
1874, to supply 2,400 inches a day, a fact un- 
precedented in ]the history of this divide, and 
1 believe unlocked for by the most sanguine. 
Of course this supply at so early a period, will 
be greatly reduced, perhaps slopped altogether 
when frost and snow set in at Tadpole. Well, 
never mind that, what we want to get at is the 
actual and possible supply, that is, what can 
really be done under ordinary circumstances. 
It is. a money calculation, and must be free from 
all bosh and exaggeration. In this spirit I hold 
the facts as we fiud them to-day, settle th 
question of supply in the affirmative, aud just 
a little more; they silence forever the miserable 
croakers who in turn, are glad enough to take 
the pay aud feed of the com r: any when they 
can get it, but who in turn, foolish and un- 
grateful to the extreme, can never give them a 
well earned word of praise or encouragement. 
From the reservoir to the Secret house, the 
canal has been cleaned and widened, and put 
in perfect condition, except in one place, which 
the early break in the weather prevented being 
finished thoroughly. These few rods however, 
will not materially interfere. It would simply 
have been better if the cement at this place 



could have been cut down a little. From the 
Secret house to Tadpole, a fine substantial 
flume one mile and a half long, sis feet and a 
half wide, and five feet deep, round an almost 
inaccessible point of rocks has been built, and 
is, perhaps, the most creditable portion of the 
whole work. It has certainly been the most 
tedious and difficult. This ends the season's 
work. Next season all that is required will be 
to reach Sailor canyon, if possible,, and to 
build a couple of reservoirs. That done, and 
Placer county may be proud of the Iowa Hill 
canal, for in every respect, it will be a mag- 
nificent property, aud reflect the higest credit, 
both as regards the time and cost of construc- 
tion, upon all who have been entrusted with its 
management. 



Coso— The New District. 

We take the following from the^Inyo Indepen- 
dent: After a close inquiry as to the real tacts in 
the case, and careful consideration of the 
united testimony of a great many of our 
citizens who have visited and examined the re- 
cent discoveries in the new Coso district, we 
are forced to the conclusion that the mines are 
simply enormous in their extent and value. 
Their discovery in the month of October last, 
was brought about as follows: Prof. Wm. D. 
Brown, a gentleman having large experience in 
the study of mines and minerals — and who, 
as early as 1867 made an examination of the 
Cerro Gordo mines as an expert— concluded, 
since the discovery of Panamint, that the 
country between Cerro Gordo and Panamint 
was rich in mineral wealth. Leaving San 
Francisco early in October, well prepared for a 
thorough prospect of that country, accompa- 
nied by his brother, he arrived at Coso late in 
that month. There he found specini- ns of 
lead ores in the possession of native Califor- 
nians, but could get no clue to the locality 
from whence they came. He immediately 
ascended the highest point near by, and took a 
view of the surrounding country, and follow- 
ing his judgment, proceeded at once to the 
mountain in which the rich mines have since 
been opened. Here he found the " Promon- 
torio " mine, with a notice of location upon 
it by "Rafael Cuervo." He then made a care- 
ful examination of the ores and formation, 
and found theTiills composed of lime rock on 
the west and porphyry on the east, and con- 
cluded that mineral must lay at the juncture of 
the two formations. Following and tracing he 
soon discovered some wonderful deposits of 
mineral, and the " New York" location was at 
ouce made, which produces very rich carbonate 
ores. To say- that the mine is forty feet -in 
width, and traceable 2,000 feet, sounds wild, 
but comes near the truth. Following further 
these formations the Browns made other loca- 
tions of carbonate mines, almost) duplicating 
the New York — i. e., the "St. Louis," the 
"Grand " and others. The latter, located on 
the 3d of November, cleaves a hill and lays be- 
tween the limestone and porphyry; it ib trace- 
able for about 3,000 feet, and in mauy places is 
30 feet in width. Bentura Beltrau, an old and 
well known prospector, early in November, 
located a truly wonderful mass of wealth, its 
general description being the, same as the Pro- 
montorio, New York and Grand ledges. 

Besides this class of mines, there has also 
been discovered and located some remarkably 
rich fissure veins. Cropping out bold and dis- 
tinctly, these veins cleave both the porphyry 
aud limestone. They bear chloride and snl- 
phuret ores, of the same description as those 
found in the earliest openings of the Comstock. 
We have authentic reports of but two of these, 
though there are many others perhaps equally 
deserving of notice. The "Mount Ophir" and 
"Solomon's Ophir" are two locations appar- 
ently on the same vein. These ledges crop out 
to a width of 20 feet, and although requested 
not to give the figures, we may state that the 
ore assays immensely rich. The hills would 
appear to be full of minerals on every hand, 
and almost daily there arrive reports of new 
and very valuable discoveries. There are now 
about 150 men in the mines and more pouring, 
in daily. 

For the benefit of the outside public we will 
give the locality of these mines: They are 40 
miles southeast of the foot of Owen's lake; 
seven miles east of the Independence and Pan- 
amint stage road, and about eight miles west 
of the head of Darwin canon. They are easily 
accessible by wagon, and Dodge's passenger 
stages run within ten miles of the new town 
which is forming at the new mines, the pro- 
posed name of which is "Darwin." Theessen-. 
tials, water and wood, are found in far greater 
abundance than ever at Cerro Gordo. In con- 
clusion we can only repeat to our citizens the 
advice proffered us by all of our informants; 
"If you doubt our statements go and see foi 
yourselves and be convinced." 



Kemoving Haik feom Hides. — A canny Sco'< 
has discovered that if a hide is immersed fo: 
four or five days in a mixture of vegetable oj 
animal charcoal and water, of the consistency 
of a thin paste, the hair is entirely removed 
and the leather made from a hide thus treatet 
is of superior quality. 

Stove luster when mixed with turpentin 
and applied in the usual manner, is blacke) 
more glossy, and more -durable than whe 
mixed with any other liquid. The turpentin 
prevents rust, and when put on an old rust 
stove, will make it look as well as new. 



January 2, 1875.] 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS 



ECHANICAL jf?ROGRESS 



Cork as a Non-Conductor of Heat. 

A company has been organized in Paris for 
the purpose of thoroughly testing the well 
known remarkable non-conducting property of 
cork. It appears that a number of steam pipes 
at several import tut establishments had been 
OOTWrod with this Hubttanue; but tho test of 
continue! application was wanting. More 
recently, how- ver. it has been fit tied that, after 
standing 18 months, the cork coveiiug has re- 
in fined intact, and is as perfect a non-conductor 
as on the day it was laid. Although the dura- 
bility of this substance had been proved boiore 
by the buoy-., which are partly immersed and 
partly exposed to tho weather; its beiug able 
to stand such high temperature as those of 
surfaces heated by steam at from seven to 
eight atmospheres had not hitherto been 
shown. 

Now, felt, which is a good non-conduotor of 
beat when first laid, deteriorates very rapidly; 
although retainiug its original appearance, it 
ceases to be effective after a few weeks, and ul- 
timately tumbles iut-> dust. 

A fear of the same result occurring in the 
case of cork would, no doubt, be entertained 
by those who are unacquainted with its nature, 
but not by those who know the composition of 
this remarkable wood-like substauce. To set 
all misgivings at rest, however, nothing is so 
satisfactory as aolu d experience, and there is 
no doubt that cork is now firmly established as 
the non-conductor par excellence. I'S light- 
ness, the readiuess with which it yields so as 
to Burround the cylinders or pipes it may be 
destined to encase, the facility with which it is 
put in its place, taken down and put np again 
in the case of an inspection or repairs to a 
boiler or steam-pipe, and above all, its non- 
conducting power, effecting so great a saving 
of fuel, assure fur it the highest place in the 
eyes of all manufacturers who regard their own 
interests. 

Tbe engineers of the French navy have made 
experiments on cork employed as a non-con- 
ductor, and have reported thereon to the 
Admiralty (French), which body has requested 
the manager of the company to uppoint, at the 
five military ports, agents charged with attend- 
ing to any orders which may be given. This 
cactet given by men so reserved as the French 
naval engineers at once places cork in the first 
rank as a non-conducting substance. 

Freeing Cast Ieonfrom Phosphorus. — The 
new German process of freeing cast iron of 
phosporus is represented as yielding superior 
bir iron from phosphureted ca*t iron, at prac- 
tically no increase of cost. The method is 
very simple. Chloride of" calcium and com- 
mon salt, fused together in about equal pro- 
portions, are intimately mixed with tho molten 
iron in the paddling furnace, either by adding 
gradually, iu two-poand water tight paper 
packages, or placing the whole quantity re- 
quired upon the bed of the pu Idling furnace 
at first, and, in either case, ve^y thoroughly 
working it with iron. The puddling process is 
generally so much shortened that the conse- 
quent diminution of the waste iron almost 
affects the cost" of the material added. The 
quantity of the mixed chlorides required is 
about three tines that of the phosphorus 
present in the cast iron. The presence of 
other chlorides, as of manganese, iron and 
magnesium, interferes wirh the process, and 
renders a large excess of chloride of calcium 
necessary. 

Metallic Pens. — It was a fortunate thought 
which led some genius to Substitute metalic 
pens for those obtained from the gray, goose 
quill, for if to-day we had to depend upon these 
sagacious birds for our supply of writing mate 
rials, quill pens would be at a premium. So 
rapid has been the increase of knowledge, and 
so greatly has cheap postage promoted the de- 
sire and the power to write, that all the quills 
in the world would not furnish one-tenth of 
the necessary supply of pens. If, therefore, it 
hal not been for the invention of gold and 
steel pens, our schools, our counting rooms, 
and our editors would have had hard timeB, 
during the time that has elapsed since quill 
pens were displaced by metallic ones, the form 
and material of these useful substitutes has 
been greatly varied, but notwithstanding the 
many forms which have been introduced, there 
is still great room for improvement, as every 
writer knows. 



Thick and Thin Saws — It is taid that the 
manufacture of mortar, beton, and concrete, 
from the waste lime of gas purifiers — a dis- 
covery or invention announced only a short 
time ago — has already commenced on an exten- 
sive scale in England. The method of thus 
utilizing what has hitherto been considered an 
almost worthless refuse, consists, iu this case, 
of simply grinding it up in an ordinary mortar 
mill, or mixing it as common lime with sand, 
aBhes and similar material. The addtion of 
Portlaud cement to the mixture is found to 
render the product— brick, slabs, etc., — much 
harder. 



Steel bails appear to be everywhere exclud- 
ing those of iron. All of the contracts lately 
given out by the Belgian Government for the 
State lines are steel. It is stated that steel 
railB are about as cheap now as iron rails were 
two or three years ago. 



Belting and Gearing. 

As regards the transmission of power, the 
Americans, says a French writer, aim at 
achieving two important things which are cor- 
relative—the lightest possible weight and the 
highest possible sp-red. Hence the universal 
substitution of belting for gearing, and the 
general adoption of light shafting and small 
pulleys, which are conspicuous features of 
their \\ stem of transmitting power. The first 
mover is usually a ^e ir, but after that all trans- 
mission is obtained by belting. The belting is 
a little Ktudy in itself, but it will suffice to say 
here that belts of th« latest improved pattern 
run for wonderful hng'hs of time without 
piecing. The ease and durability of the sys- 
tem, would, I think, astonish the advocates of 
gearing, The light shafting and small pulleys 
in general use nrebaid to save twenty-five per 
cent, of the power. The shafting is run twice 
as fast, and hence the pulleys can be smaller, 
yet the fly wheel of a powerful engine may be 
large. For instince, I have seen one twenty- 
seven feet in diameter going, as I was informed, 
u mile a minute. The pulleys are ca>t, but it 
is expected that wrought pulleys much lighter 
will Boon come into general use. Hollow 
shafting is finding favor. If shafting aud pul- 
leys could bo advantageously constructed of 
steel, the saving of power would probably be 
greatly increased. EogineB aud their equip- 
ments, and belting, shafting, and pulleys, are 
all madeiu the United States. 

Air Pressure in Wind Instruments, — Dr. 
W. H. Stone iu a paper before the Physical 
Society, of London, describes some experi- 
ments on the wind pressure in the human 
lungs during the performance on wind instru- 
ments. About 6 feet of water or 13 pounds 
pressure per square inch was the ordiuary 
maximum when a small tube was iuserted be- 
tween the lips. When the lips were supported 
by a capped mouth piece, as iu crass instru- 
ments, a much greater pressure could be sus- 
tained, and Up muscles invariably gave way 
long before the expiratory power of the tho- 
racic muscles was exhausted. The following 
pressures were sufficient to produce an orches- 
tral tone: The obee requires an air pressure of 
from 5 to 10 ounces per square inch, the clari- 
onet, 8 to 14 ounces; horn, 2% to 5 ounces; 
cornet, 5 to 18 ounces; euphonium, 1% to 23 
ounces; bombardone, 1% to' 20 ounces. It 
will be noticed that the clarionet, in this, as in 
some other respects, differs from its kindred 
instruments, and also that some of the press- 
ures are small, not exceeding or indeed attain- 
ing the pressure of a fit of coughing. They 
are, therelore, very unlikely to injure the 
the lungs, or to produce the emphysema erro- 
niously attributed to them. 

Springs as Motors. — The method of pro- 
pelling cars, omnibuses and velocipedes by 
coiled springs is being tried in England, and 
with good prospects of success. The motor 
U3ed is an arrangement of powerful springs 
encased in cylinders like watch springs on a 
very large scale. A car worked by these 
springs is shortly to be tried on the tramway 
at Greenwich. The services of French ma- 
chinists have also been called into requisition, 
and steel bauds capable of being coiled and of 
exerting great pressure have been made in 
lengths of oue hundred yards eaoh. In Shef- 
field some of the steel manufacturers have 
turned out springs fifty and sixty feet long, 
and said to be capable of a pressure of eight 
hundred pounds. To wind up these springs of 
course requires more power than could be ob- 
tained by hand, and the English experimenter 
proposes to have them wound at certain inter- 
vals by means of stationary engines. There- 
suit of the experiments will be looked for with 
much interest. Some of the English patents 
have a combination of spiral or helical springs/ 

Pulling up Forest Trees by Steam.— Some 
interesting experiments in the clearing of 
wooded lands took place lately in Scotland. 
The experiments were carried out nuder the 
auBpices of the Canadiin Land Reclamation 
Company and were intended to demonstrate 
the ea^e with which the forests of Canada 
could be cleared by means of this process. A 
traction engine of twelve hors'i power is sta- 
tioned some distance off from the wood, and a 
wire chain is fastened to the tree. Steam is 
theu put on, and the tree is pulled out by the 
roots. An objection to the ad iption of tho 
process was that it would injure the wood by 
splitting the tree; but the experiments showed 
that, with proper precautions, there was no 
fear of such a result. In five hours upward 
of 300 trees, iu a plantation nearly 100 years 
old; were pulled out. Of that number not 
above half a dozen were broken, and in these 
cases the result was wholly due to the inex- 
perience of the men. engaged in the work, who 
placet the chain too high up on the tree. 

Computing the Speed of G-karing and Pul- 
lets. — The following simple rule for calculat- 
ing the speed or gearing of pulleys is, doubt- 
less, in familiar use by many mechauics. We 
give it, however, for the convenience of those 
of our readers who may not happen to be ac- 
quainted with it, and who have found the need 
in ■practice of a uniform rule, applying to all 
cases. To find the speed of a driven wheel, 
when the number of teeth of both wheels and 
the number of revolutions of the driving wheel 
are given: Multiply the number of teeth of the 
driving wheel by the number of its revolutions; 
divide the product by the number of teeth of 
the driven wheel, and the quotient will be the 
number of revolutions of the driven wheel. 



SCIENTIFIC PROGRESS. 



The Transit and Its Probable Results. 

The full result of the patient watchings of 
the various parties deputed to observe tho 
transit of Venus, will not be made kuown to 
the world for several months, perhaps not in a 
year from now; and they will probably be 
affected with a larger possible error than is gen- 
erally anticipated. It will be some weeks be- 
fore the telescopic measures taken at all tho 
stations can oe known, even if Irasmitted by 
telegraph, because many of those stations are 
fur removed from any ocean oable at present in 
existence. At many of the statious the chief 
dependence will be on photographic views, 
and the negatives cannot be transmitted by 
means of thu lightning flash; they can only he 
carried by the slower agency of steam to 
tbe observatories where they can be submitted 
to measurement with the micrometer. Then 
all the results obtained at separate stations 
must be compared, and many laborious calcu- 
lations be made before the value of the solar 
parallax can be known. 

Mr. E. Colbert, in some remarks at a late 
mooting of the Chicago Academy of Sciences 
said: " I have called your attention, at former 
meetings to the difficulties which will be en- 
countered in the attempt to reconcile these 
observations; difficulties arising from, 1, the 
irregular shape of the earth, which is not a 
true oblate spheroid; 2, the irregular contour of 
the sun, its surface being in a state of perpet- 
ual commotion; and, 3, the errors of observa- 
tion, which may be regarded as an external 
kind of " personal equation." Summing the 
probable average of these three factors of error, 
I conclude that the astronomical world will be 
fortunate if it is able to reconcile all the obser- 
vations so as to make it certain that the ac- 
cepted average is not more than 100,000 miles 
in error, or one part iu 900 of the whole dis- 
tance. 

Tbere is no reason to doubt that we already 
know the distance of the sun to within S00,- 
000 miles. I speak not now of my own calcu- 
lations of the quantity, but of the extremes 
claimed by others. If we assume 91,700, OuO 
miles as the average, this estimate will not be 
more than 200,000 miles, from tbe 92,000,000 
miles of Newcomb, or the 91,480,000 of the 
English computers. This is one part in 300 of 
the whole distance. Hence the probability is 
that observations of the tranist of Venus in 
1874, on which more than 951,000,000 have 
been expended, and involving the equivalent of 
not less than 200 yeirs of labor on the part of 
one man, will only reduce the uncertainty to 
about one-third of its present magnitude. But 
this will be no mean achievement. It is not 
saying too much to claim that this result will 
be worth at least ten times the money and 
labor expended in obtaining it." 



Peat Charcoal as a' Deodobizeb —The ex- 
traordinary deodorizing power possessed by 
that variety of charcoal known as bone-black is 
generally attributed to the earthly matter with 
which it is mixed. It was therefore to be ex- 
pected that peat charcoal Bhould be specially 
valuable in this direction, and in some parts of 
England and Scotland it is now extensively 
used for mixing with the excreta of households 
on account of its value as a deodorizer. Peat 
charcoal is one of the most porous of all forms 
of impure carbon, and its powers of absorption 
when dry are very great. Thus, in some ex- 
periments tried in the town of Leamington, 
England, recently, it was found that two or 
three ounces of newly-made peat charcoal were 
sufficient to deodorize six gallons of ordinary 
sewage. The actual proportions employed, ac- 
cording to the report, were about one part of 
charcoal to 150 of Bewage by weight; and in a 
few minutes after the charcoal was mixed wiih 
the rich albuminoid sewage, a peculiar sweet 
smell was noticed, but in less than a quarter of 
an hour all amell had disappeared, and the 
constant addition of fecal matter did not per- 
manently restore the odor. A closet arranged 
for the purpose was devoted, to the use of some 
forty laborers, but even during the hottest 
weather, on no occasion, was any offensive 
effluvia noticeable, although the amount of 
peat charcoal daily made use of did not equal 
the proportion already stated. 

The Telemeter in Surveying — Captain W. 
H. Ball, in some remarks recently made before 
the Civil Engineer's Club, of New York, said 
that he had used the telemeter for four years on 
the coast and interior of Alaska. His rod was 
even more simple than Mr. French's, and he 
found that he could depend on. his surveys 
being almost accurate, and in some cases much 
more so than if measured with the chain or 
tape. On rocky shores, the telemeter was in- 
valuable, and in a few months he had, with the 
assistance of a common sailor, as rodman, 
made surveys that by the ordinary methods 
would require fully five years to complete. He 
discovered after a time that for correct results 
an accurate focus was necessary, and to every 
observation the following correction* or error 
in measurement was to be added, viz.: to the 
distance of the eye-piece from the object glass 
add the distance of the object glass from the 
diaphragm, which in the case of his instrument 
was exactly one foot. This subject of survey- 
ing with the telemeter is a very important one, 
and worthy of careful investigation. 



The Development of Natural History and 
Science. 

Mr. W. W. Calkins, recently before the Chi- 
cago Academy of Sciences, read* a very inter- 
esting paper on "The Development of" Natural 
lli-tury as a Science," of which the following 
digest is given in the Engineer and 4rcAifc cti 

The great lamented Agassiz said, "I have de- 
voted my whole life to the study of nature, and 
yet a ftingle Bentencw may express all that 1 
have done." This confession reveals to us a 
degree of simplicity and gradeur not often wit- 
nessed. It suggests that the grace of modesty 
might be cultivated by most pnople with great 
propriety. Since man was first created he has 
been engaged in studying the world of auim ite 
and inanimate objects around him. As the 
first rude efforts seems to us like childish dis- 
plays, so, when the present era shall becoiiieuu- 
tiquity, our attainments in knowledge will no 
doubt appear small indeed in comparison with 
the advances that shall mark future ages. 

Aristotle was tbo first prominent naturalist, 
and the founder of the science. As evidence of 
this, we have his "History of Animals." Iu 
AriStorVd time, 2,000 years ago, text-books of 
natural history were in common use, add the 
study was pursued with viyor. We are still 
without elementary works of this kind adapted 
to the young beginners. We are, however, 
working up to the point Iwhen the- study of 
natural history in the school will be indispen- 
sable and popular. After 1800, Linnaeus re- 
sumed the work where Aristotle had left it. 
Pliny added but a little to what had been done 
by Aristotle. The Middle Ages, with an intel- 
lectual pall dark as night, followed the enlight- 
eued period cf Roniau and Oreciau history, 
and gave us nothing. The sixteenth century 
witnessed a temporary revival in this and other 
branches of learning. The naturalists were 
mainly occupied in studying local species, and 
in disputing over ancient authors. The seven- 
teenth century witnessed remarkable advances 
iu general knowledge, but men had not yet 
done wondering over the successful revolt of 
the Netherlands, or the brilliant military career 
of Gustavus Adolphus, Walltnstein, andTully. 

It was reserved for Linnaeus, in the lastceu- 
tury, to break the spell that had for so ni iny 
ages been hung over the pursuit of the natural 
sciences, aud strike the key-note that aroused 
the scholars of Europe from their lethargy, 
Aristotle had given ns genera aud species; he 
divided the animal kingdom into Enaitria and 
Anaima, or blooded and bloodless anintals. 
Linuaeus, begiuniug where Aristotle left off, 
formed, in addition, classes and orders. He 
divided the animul into six classes— mammalia, 
birds, reptiles, fishes, instcs aud worms. The 
classification at once aroused the attention and 
provoked the criticism of other naturalists. 
The defects were pointed out, and the impor- 
tant principle of classification founded upon 
the internal strncture, and uniting animals upon 
common structural characters, was established. 
The magnitude of the work of classification 
will be appreciated when we consider that the 
species now number 230,000. The confusion 
.t iat existed before Linnaeus' time on account 
of tbe different names and languages employed 
by naturalists was counteracted, and in fact 
done away with by the use of one language by 
him — the Latin. 

Linnaeus' classification, however, did not 
meet with en'ire success. Its effects did not 
escape criticism. All, with the exception of the 
great Cuvier, failed to strike the grand princi- 
ples of classification. When he announced his 
theory dividing the whole animal kingdom into 
tour classes — Vertebrates, Mollusks, Articu- 
lates and Radiates— the scientific world stood 
amazed, as though a revelation hacLbeenuiade 
from Heaven. The founder of comparative 
anatomy was not one who skimmed over the 
surface of things Cuvier went deeper; he ex- 
amined the internal organization and revela- 
tions of animals. He tells us the comparison 
was the secret of his success. The result em- 
bo. lied the four plans of creation already men- 
tioned. The views of Cuvier, which have 
withstood criticism for nearly three-quarters of 
a century, lead to three conclusions: First, that 
Cuvier's four classes embrace all known ani- . 
mals. Second, that there is thought aud har- 
monious law as the basis of all, the whole di- 
rected by oue will— the Creator. Third, that 
the numerous subdivisions of the four great 
groups mentioned, such as classes, orders, fam- 
ilies, genera, species and other subdivisions of 
these subdivisions, should be formed in accord- 
ance with characters expressed iu nature to be 
of value. Otherwise they are artificial distinc- 
tions tending to lead us away from what we 
seek, and that which is the basis of all science 
— fie truth. 

Another great discovery hardly less impor- 
tant than those mentioned was that of Von 
Ba^r in embryology— or tho fact that all ani- 
mals originate from eggs and though all alike 
at first, grow to maturity on four different 
plans. Embryology is yet iu its iufancy. 
Agassiz made some of his greatest discoveries 
in this science, aud it furnishes one of the most 
attractive and promising fields op'Oi to the ex- 
plorer. The progress of natural history for 50 
years has been rapid. The latter part of the 
last and the beginning'of the present century 
were particularly marked by great discoveries. 
The present century has produced hosts of dis- 
tinguished naturalists who have labored suc- 
cessfully in their particular departments, but 
Agassiz, before his death, probably ranked 
first among living contemporaries. 

Mr. Calkins closed by saying that the study 
of natural history should be popularized. 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



[January 2, 1875. 



Mining Stocks. 

Tbe mining share market has been in a state 
of excitement during the past week as it has 
for the past month. The prices reached for 
some stocks have opened the eyes of even some 
of the oldest speculators, and a man wants a 
fortune to buy half a dozen shares of any of 
the leading mines. With this condition of af- 
fairs it is laughable to read tbe "words of cau- 
tion," etc., given in the newspapers about 
poor people investing in stocks. A poor man 
would not be apt to buy many shares of Cali- 
fornia, Opbir or Consolidated Virginia at pres- 
ent prices, especially as cash is wanted and 
margins are not acceptable. Some foolish peo- 
ple of course will invest at haphazard when the 
market is up, who have not the pluck to try 
when prices are low. Tbe stock dealings fit 
present in the big mines are confined to rich 
men who can afford to lose if a bad break oc- 
curs. 

It is stated that Alvinza Hayward has sold 
his interest in the Crown Point mine and mills 
to William Sharon for the sum of $1, 600,000 
But how much property was transferred, it is 
impossible to state. 

Affairs in the Comstock look very favorable 
and the big bonanza is being gradually ex- 
plored. The Enterprise says that the ore devel- 
opments in tbe Consolidated Virginia are of a 
character so extraordinary that few persons are 
able to comprehend their full extent aud value. 
Great as is the width of ore in this mine it 
will probabl/ be found to be still more exten- 
sive in the California, as Dear the south line 
the configuration of the ground shows the be- 
ginning of a gradual expansion. In the Ophir 
the ore is making north and east in the most 
satisfactory manner, with clay seams in places 
which indicate strength aud depth. It is quite 
proable that the cross-cuts going east on tbe 
1465-foot level wiil encounter still greater de- 
posits of ore in thai, direction than have yec 
been found. At the south end of the lead all 
is looking well or important developments in 
several places, as in the Empire and Yellow 
Jacket neighborhood, at the Overman and at 
the Justice. The American Flat mines are also, 
several of them approaching a point where re'- 
velopments may be expected. Some of these 
have already found bodies of ore that appear 
to be the beginning of somethin ■ valuable. 
Great activity in prospecting is beginning to 
be manifested. 

The mining stock excitement has had its usu- 
al effect in inducing the managers of mining 
companies to "divide up" and increase the 
capital stock and number of shares. Several 
companies have advertised special meetings for 
this purpose, as follows : The California will 
have a meeting on the 20th of January, for the 
purpose of considering a proposition to in- 
crease the capital stock of the company from 
$10,800,000 to $54,000,000, to be divided into 
540,000 shares, of tbe per vaiue of $100 each. 
The Consolidated Virginia will hold a meeting 
January 26th, to increase the capital stock from 
$10,800,000 to $54,000,000, to be divided into 
540,000 shares, of a par value of $100 each. 
Tb» Succor Mill aud Mining crmpany will 
meet on the 30th of January, when they 
propose increasing the capital stock from 
$l,140,C00iu 22,800 shares to $3,420,000 di- 
vided iu 68,400 shares of a par value of $50. 
The Gould & Curry Mining company will mi et 
on the 25th of January to increase the capital 
slock fiorn $4,800,000 to $10,800,00u, divided 
into 108,000 shares of a par value of $100. 
The Buckeye M. Co, will meet January 20th to 
increase the capital stock from $1,600,000 m 
16,000 shares to $4,800,000 divided in 48,000 
shares of a par vnlue of $100. The Union 
Consolidated M. Co. will meet January 23d to 
discuss a propoai ion to increase the capital 
stock from $2,000,000 in 20,000 shares to $10,- 
000,000 in 100,000 shares of $100 each. The 
Beach and Paxton M. Co. will meet January 
14ih to increase tbe capital stock from $2,000,- 
000 in 20,000 to $6 000,000 iu 60,000 shareB of 
the par value of $100. 

Mining Accidents. 

A terrible accident ociured in the Sutro tun- 
nel on Wednesday last, at which time a shift of 
ten men were b'own up by an explosion. Two 
of the miners, whose names were JohuDilaney 
and Samuel Richards, were blown into atoms. 
A Mr. Pillow was thought to be mortal' j 
wonnded, and a number of others were badly 
injured. Tbe accident happened at tbe time of 
changing shifts, and a blast was about to be ex- 
ploded in tbe face, or header of the tunn 1. The 
men retreated back about 600 feet, where the 
battery used iu exploding blasts was dtuated. 
Several boxes of giant powder had been left 
near the battery, and when the blast iu the 
header was touched off, it is thought that the 
giant powder was exploded by an electric spark. 

A fatal accid' nt occurred at the Imperial 
mine Tufsday night, which resulted in tbe in- 
stant death of Hugh Callick, a miner, who was 
engaged with others in drilling a hole at the bot- 
tom of the incline. A huge rock became de- 
tached from the side of the incline, a short dis- 
tance above, aud rolled upon the men, Callick 
being caught under the rock and instantly 
killed. The others escaped without injury. 

Rafferty, the mau who was injured in the 
Crowu Point mine by being crushed while com- 
ing up the incline on tbe giraffe, died last Fri- 
day morning in the county hospital. 



MINING SHAREHOLDERS' DIRECTOR!. 



Compiled every Thursday from Advertisements in the Mining and Scientific Press and 

other S. F. Journals.! 



ASSESSMENTS.— STOCKS ON THE LIST OF THE BOARDS. 



Company. 



Location. No. Ami. Levied. Ddinq'nt. Bale-. Secretary. Place of Business 



American Flag M & M Co Ely District 

American Flat M Co Washoe 

Andes S M Co Washoe 

Arizona & Utah M Co Washoe 
Arizona S M On Union ville Nevada 

R.iltiiuore Onus MCo Washoe 

Bellevue M O Placer Co Cal 

Bowery Cons M Co Ely District 

Buckeye n ASM Co Nevada 

Chariot Mill 4 M Co San Diego Co 

Crjollar-Potosi M Co Washoe 

r>an«v M Co Washoe 

Empire Mill & M Co Washoe 

Em nirc MCo Idaho 

Globe M Co Wnshoe 

Ida Elmore M Co Idaho 

Imperial S M Co Washoe 

Justice M ('n Washoe 

Kentuck M Co Washoe 

KnickprbookerMCo Wnshoe 1 

Lady Brvan M Co Nevada 

Mint G A S M Co Washoe 

Monitor-Bel njont M Co Nevada 
Original Gold Hill G ,fc S MCo Washoe 

Original Hidden Treasure White Pine 
Overman S M Co 
Pioche S M Co 
Pioche West Ex MCo 
Raymond A Ely M ' o 
Rock Island rt A S M Co 
R^^tTacket M Co 
<i vace M Co 
Sierra Nevada S M Co 
Smith Chariot MCo 



Tyler M C<> 
Utah S M Co 
War Eagle M Pr> 
Washington & Creole M Co 
Woodville G & S M Co 
Yellow Jackets MCo 



Yule Gravel M Co 



Washoe 

Ely District 

Ely District 

Ely District 

Washoe 

Idaho 
Woslioe 
Washoe 

Idaho 
Washoe 
Washoe 

Idaho 
Ely Dist 
Washoe 
Washoe 



Placer Co Cal 



50 Nov 10 Deo 14 Jan 11 G R Spinney 

100 Dec 7 Jan 9 Jan 27 C A Sankey 

Fl> Dec 7 Jan II Feb 1 M Landers 

75 Deo 10 Jan 14 Feb 2 J Mapuire 

100 Nov 3" Jan 8 Jan 29 Wm Willis 

100 Deo 5, Jan 8 Jan 29 D T Baclev 

50 Dec 10 Jan H Feb 4 D F Verdenal 

20 Dec 15 Jan 25 Feb 28 C E Elliott 

I Olj Nov 14 Dec 18 Jan 7 C a Sankey 

50 Dec 24 Jarr23 Feb 13 P Swift 

5 HO Nov 14 Dec 18 Jan 7 WE Dean 

100 Oct 27 Dec 4 Dec 28 GR Spinney 

50 Dec 28 Jao29 Feb 18 W E Dean 

100 Nov 10 Dec 10 Jan 4 William Willis 

75 Dec 10 Jan 14 Feb 2 J Maguire 

100 Nov 16 Dec 21 Jan 12 Willia-i, Willis 

1 00 Nov 26 Dec 29 Jan 19 W E Dean 

3 00 Nov 13 Dec 15 Jan 15 J S Kennedy 

1 0c) Dec 3 Jan 5 Jan 28 V Swift 

1 50 D.c 28 Jan 30 Feb 19 H Boyle 

H Nov ll Dec Ifi Jan 11 F Swift 

10 Nov 17 Dec 22 Jan 15 D A Jennings 

50 Nov 10 Dec 14 Jan 4 WW Hopkins 

50 Deo 12 JanU Feb 1 W M Helman Fireman's Fand Bldg 

lltn Oct 12 Dec 11 Jan 7 D A Jennings 401 California si 

3 00 Decl Jan 5 Jan 26 G D Edwards 414 California st 

— Dec 11 Jan 21 Feb 1« O E Elliott 419 California st 

30 Dec 28 Feb 3 Feb 25 T L Kimball 409 Ciliforniast 

3 00 Nov 3 Dec 10 Jan" T *' Colburn 418 California st 

1 00 Nov lfi Deo 21 Jan 12 J W Clark 418 " 'alifornia st 

50 Nov28 Jan 5 « Jan 26 Wm Willis 419 California st 

5 00 Dec 5 Jan 1 Jan 27 E B Holmes 419 California st 

3 00 Dec 1 Jan 5 Jan 26 G D Edwards 414 California st 

50 Nov 5 Dec 11 Jan 5 OHB^gart 402 Montgomery st 

50 Nov 19 Jan 21 Feb 12 O D Squire Stevenson's Bldg 

1 00 Nov 25 Dec 30 Jan 20 WE Dean 419 California st 

100 Nov 9 Dec 16 J -n 6 L Karlan 401 California st 

50 Pec 8 JanU Feb 4 F D Clearv Merchants' Ex 

1 «'0 Nov9 DecI4 Janft W M Helman 40L California st 

5 00 Dec 10 Jan 13 Feb 13 G W Hopkins Gold Hill 

10 Nov 9 Deo 14 Jan 5 W H Watson 302 Montgomery st 



320 California st 

331 Montgomery st 

507 Montgomery st 

419 0-riforniH st 

419 California st 

401 California -t 

409 California st 

419 California st 

331 Monteomcy st 

419 California si 

41<1 California st 

320 California st 

419 California st 

419 California st 

419 California si 

419 California st 

419 California st 

Merchants' Ex 

419 California st 

Stevenson's Bldg 

419 California s' 

401 California st 

41 IS California 



OTHER COMPANIES— NOT ON THE LISTS OF THE BOARDS. 



Baltic Cons M Co 
Calaveras Hydraulic M Co 
Cherry Creek MAM Co 
Combination G A S M Co 
Con Reformi L A S M Co 
Edith Quicksilver M C 
Florence M Co 
-420" M Co 
Globe OonsM Ci 
Globe M Co 
fiold Mt G M Co 
Gold Run M Co 
Golden Rule S M Co 
Howard Hill G MCo 
Illinois Central M Co 
Juniata Ons S M Co 
Kennedy M Co 
Keystone N" 1 A 2 M Co 



Wn shoe 

Cal 

Nevada 

Pan ami nt 

Lower Cal 

Cal 

Humboldt Co Cal 

Washoe 

Washoe 

Washoe 

Holcomb Valley Cal 

Nevada Co Oil 

Utah 

Cal 

Idaho 

Aurora Nev 

Amndor Co Cal 

Arzona 



75 



Ladv Washington M Co Washoe 

Lake Tahnn ,t S F Water Works Cal 
Martin A Walling M A M Co Cal 

New York Cons M Co Washoe 

New York M Co Washoe 

v orth Bloomfipld Gravel M Co Cal 

North Fork M Co PlnmasCo Cat 

Oneida M Co AmadorCoCal 

Pag« Tunnel Co Utah 

Poormao G A S M Co Idaho 

Rattlesnake Quicksilver M Co Cal 

South Fork M A Canal Co Cal 

Star Kinc S M Co Elko Co Nevada 

Rnccor M A M Co Washoe 

Thrift G A S M Co Calaveras Co Cal 
Watson M Co Robinson Dist J>eva'la 
Wells. Fargo A Co M Co Washoe 

Woodville M A M Co El Dorado Co Cal 
Ya Thorough S M Co Kern Co Cal 



15 Nov 18 

5 D"c7 

15 Nov 10 

10 Dec 28 

50 Dec 24 

20 Dec 23 

10 Dec 5 

1 00 Dec 29 
Dec M 

15 Uec 10 

50 Nov 19 

20 Dec 7 

5 Dec 8 

50 Nov 7 

30 Dec 21 

I 00 Dec Ifi 

1 00 Dec lfi 

1 00 Dec 12 

30 Doc 17 

Zi Nov 18 

5" Deo 7 

50 Deo 5 

50 Dec 5 

1 00 Dec I 

75 Dec 5 

1 00 Dec 11 

5 Doc 12 

50 Nov 13 

1 25 Dec 21 

5 Dec 7 

25 Dec 4 

1 00 Nov 27 

50 Nov ?4 

1 00 Nov 16 

Dec 21 

25 Nov 10 

30 Dec 23 



Deo 23 
Jan 9 
Dec 14 
Feb 1 
Jan 30 
Feb 3 
Jan 8 
Feb 2 
Jan 14 
Jan 14 
Djc 29 
Jan 11 
Jan 15 
Dee 16 
Jan 20 
Jan 21 
Jan 20 
Jan 12 
Jan 21 
Dec 23 
Jan 8 
Janfi 
Jan 6 
Jan 4 
Jan 4 
Jan 16 
Jan 20 
Dec 18 
Jan 28 
Jan 10 
Jan 8 
Jan 4 
Dec 26 
Doc 21 
Jan 30 
Dec 19 
Jan 3i l 



Jan 20 
Jan 25 

Jan 7 
Feb 23 
Feb 20 
Feb 23 

Feb 3 
Feb 20 

Feb 2 

Feb 2 
Jan 23 

Feb 3 
Feb 15 

Jan" 
Feb 23 
Feb 10 
Feb 10 

Febl 

Feb 8 
Jan 18 
Jan 23 
Jan 25 
Jan 25 

Jnn 25 
Jnn 19 

Feb 3 
Feb 20 
Jan H 
Feb 19 

Febl 
Jnn 26 
Jan 25 
Jan 16 
Jan 13 
Feb IS 

Jan 6 
Feb 23 



B Bnrris 
A Shear 
D F Verdenal 
D Wilder 
A D Carpenter 
W Stuart 
I E Dilavau 
E F Stone 
J Matruire 
J Maguire 
JPCavallier 
C C Palmer 
K We-theimer 
F J Hermann 
R H Brown 
CSNeal 
A Wissel 
W R Townsend 
H C Kibbe 
E Oh at tin 
J W Tripp 
H C Kibbe 
H O Kibbe 
ID^rby 
A Martin 
1. Kaplan 
J Ha i dy 
William Willis 
A Baird 
H Knnpp 
L Kaplj n 
W H Watson 
TT R West 
WH Watson 
A O Tavlor 
J Gl issman 
E Barry 



507 Montgomery st 
321 Batterv st 

409 California st 
Merchants' Ex 

605 Clay st 

113Liedeadorff st 

2.0 Mont ornery st 

419 California st 

419 California st 

419 California st 

513 California st 

41 Market st 

flSOClavst 

418 Kea r ny st 

402 Alontcrninerv st 

419 California st 

210 California st 

310 Pine st 

419 California Bt 

803 Montgomery st 

408 California st 

419 California st 

410 California st 
320 California et 

520 Washington st 
Merchants' Ex 

418 California st 

419 California st 
316 California st 

:!06 Montg mery st 
Merchants' Ex 
302 Montgomerv st 
210 Montgomery st 
302 Montgomery st. 
331 Montgomery st. 
335 Montgomerv st 
415 Montgomery st 



Name of Co. 



MEETINGS TO BE HELD. 

Location. Secretary. Office in S F. 



Beach A Paxt»n G A S M Co 

yn< licvn ii A SM Co 

Rullion M Co Washoe 

California M Co Wnshoe 

California M Co Waslve 

Consolidated Virginia Wash<>e 

Consolidated Virginia M Co Washoe 

Dexter S M Co 

•'4J0" M c Washoe 

Georgia S M Co Nevada 

Gould A Carry S M Co Washoe 

Ironsides M Co 

Iowa M Co 

Knickerbocker M Co Washoe 

Memnon M Co 

Nevada f, & S M Co 

North Utah M Co Washoe 

Orleans M Co 

Prussian Gold A S M Co 

Succor M A M Co Washoe 

Utica Cons M Co 

Union Cons M Co Washoe 

Webfoot M Co Elko '"o Nevada 



Called l>v Trustee* 

Called by Trustes 

,7 S Kennedy 

Cnlled (>v Trustees 

DT Bagl- v 

Called bv Trustees 

D T Pauley 

FHHill 

E F Stone 

R Wegener 

Cal'pd bv Trustees 

W E Dean 

A D Carpenter 

H Biyle 

W E t»ean 

J G Bloomer 

C S On<tis5 

W E Dean 

R H Brown 

Cal led by Trustees 

W E Dean 

Called by Trustees 

D A Jennings 



.507 Montgomery st 

331 Montgomery st 

- Merchants' Ex 

401 California st 

401 California st 

401 California st 

401 Californ'a st 

tW4 California st 

419 California st 

414 California st 

438 California st 

419 California st 

605 Clav*t 

Steven=on's Block 
419 California st 
419 California st 
119 California st 
119 Califnrniast 
102 California st 

302 Montgomery at 
419 California st 
Merchants' Ex 
4i'l California !-t 



Meeting. 

Special 
Special 
Annua 1 
Special 
Annual 
Special 
Annual 
Annual 
Annunl 
Annual 
Special 
Annual 
Annual 
Annual 
Annual 
Annual 
Annunl 
Annual 
Annual 
Special 
Annual 
special 
Annual 



Date. 

Jan 14 
Jan 20 
Jan 14 
Jan2ii 
Jan 20 
Jan 26 
Jan 14 

Jan 9 
Jan 11 

Jan 5 
Jan 23 
Jan 13 
Jan 12 
Jan 15 
Jan 12 

Jan t 
Jan 14 
Jan 12 

Jan 4 
Jan 30 
Jan 13 
J no 23 
Jan 11 



LATEST DIVIDENDS (within three months)— MINING INCORPORATIONS. 



Name of Co. 

Black Bear Quartz M. Co. 
Beleher M Co. 
Chariot H & M Co 
Consolidated Virginia M Co 
Crown Point M Co 
Diana M. Co. 

Eureka Consolidate'! M Co 
Keystone Quartz M Co 
Phcenii O M Co 
Rye Paten M Co 



I-ocation. Secretary. 



Cal W L. Oliver, 
Washoe. H O. Kibbe, 
Cal Frank Swift 
Wnshoe D T Barley 
Washoe O E Elliott 
N. n. Fa^sot. 
Nev WWTraylcr 
Cal L Vesaria 

Charles EEUio 
Nevada D F Verdenal 



Pffice in S. !F. 

316 California st. 
419 California st. 
4.9 California st 
401 California st 
414 California st 
220 Clay st. 
419 California st 



Payable. 

July 17 
Dec ll) 
Nov 16 
Dec 11 
Dec 12 
J an . 25 
Decs 
Feb 16 
June 39 
Dec 5 



New Incorporations. 

Jeffebsdk S. M. Co., Dec. 24.— Location: Jeffereon 
Mining District, Nye county. Nevada. Capital stock, 
$5,nuo,000. Directors— W. S. Hobart, Stephen Roberts, 
A.H. Kutherford,C X. HoVbs, and John S. Gray. 

Southern Cross G. & S. Co. Dec. 28. — Location, Sotrey 
county, Nevada. Capital stock. ¥6,000,000. Directors — 
J. R. Spring, E. O. Brown, F. S. Spring, S. C. Herbert 
and H. S. Brown. 

The following named companies have filed certificates 
of incorporation in the office of the Secretary of State 
at Sacramento. 

Comstock Beseficiattng Co. — Capital stock, $10,000, 
000, in shares of $100 each. 

The Cosmopolitan Mining Co. has also filed certifi- 
cate of increase'of capital stock from $5,000,000 to $10,- 
000,000, in shares of $100 each. 



The diti-h, pipe and tnnnils of tbe North 
Fork Mining compiny, located in Plamas 
county, have been completed, and tbe water 
turned through the eight miles of pipe. The 
ditch is 15*o miles long. Work was com- 
menced about the last of July und completed 
on the 2l$t rile. 



Suteo Tunnel. — The following is ihe report 
of progress of tbe Sutro Tunnel company for 
tbe we'-k endiDg December 23d, according to 
the Independent: Progress made from Decem- 
ber 15 to December 22, 110 feet; beadpr ad- 
vanced 7,858 feet from mouth to 7,96*8. Iu ad- 
dition to this portion of tbe tunnel 341 feet had 
been made at shaft No. 2 before the water came 
in. Add this amount to 7,968 and we have 
8, 309 feet as the actual length of the tunnel. 
One hundred and ten feet n ihe largest weekly 
run made vetorf ihe tunnel or on any similar 
work in the woild. 



The ore breasts and etopes throughout all 
the ore producing levels in the Btloher mine 
coutinue to bold out and yield haud^omely, 
and the development of the 1500-foot level is 
being vigorously prosecuted by tbe winzes 
from the 140U, with excellent ore oroapoets. 



At the Sierra Nevada nine on the Comstock 
preparations are being made to drain the old 
shaft. It is 700 ftet deep, and is to be sunk 
100 ftet deeper, when a drift north will be run 
to develop tbe Dew body of ore found in that 
direction, near the Phil Sheridan mine. From 
the bottom of the shaft an incline is to be 
started, following the dip of tbe ledge to the 
east, down the west wall, with a view to inter- 
cept the north extension of the great bonanza, 
in case it should extend so far in that direction. 



Sales at the S. F. Stock Exchange. 



Last Week. 

■Wednesday, December 23. 
morning session. 

710 Ophir 176^180 

5....bl5, „182 

20 ....lift 178 

3170 Mexican 4.i(^J0 

SO ....b30 „45 

tftO .. bft 44 

1970 G4C 5(jW,*a58 

ftftO ....b30 ftS^'&W 

3980 Be-t * Bui 61a«7k 

20 ....h30 T.6l4 

80 ....hill d8i67Jg 

47ft SavaKe I38@140 

10 ... b:*0 142 

SO ....bft ....14" 

790 Cholliir 80(3)8-1 

SO ....t>30 8S 

8it b 5 fSaS-i 

385 B.& Nor 63@ft5 

■H) ....b M 66 

13Z5 O Point 47(5)50 

595 Jncket 150@l54 

30 ....bS.... „lft4 

3585 rrai»erial ..lft^®17 

6fi5 Empire M It) 

250 I'onG Hill 7&TS 

3s5 Ken tuck 20;a21 

25 ....h 30 

475 Alplia 25@27 

50 ....1>30 26 

3405 Belcher ft0(m55 

225 ....o3ii 54{a)5S 

5 ....h 3 „r54 

12.1K Confidence "" 

50 ....b 3d 

665 Con Vir 495(3)500 

145 . - b 5 502!4@500 

4.IS5 Sierra Nev 2t>$25 

300 ....b30 2o@26M 



200 . 



-.25 



...2',i 

.-IT.-WHW 



2011 Danov 

165 California 
50 ....b 4..... 

30 Excheq 25U;fl(2iO 

afternoon session, 

430 M Vallry 

890 Ray & Ely 2iy.o2i 

235 Eur i'o» 13^(d)13^ 

2»i Pioche .S@i3 

290 Am Klag 1^1% 

430 Belmont ;.. 14^*15 

310 Monitor Belmunt 2 

1(155 Hye Patch 3&(o)4 

201 Eldo South ..7.2 

50 Cttar M 

215 Cherry Creek 1& 

40 Eureka 8 

350 Golden Chariot 2'«fSi3 

70 Sec Belcher IttOt&ftO 

1720 Overman 82(0)84 

170 Justice S0@81 

205 Succor 5*ff»6 

4u0 Lady Bryan 4(gl4>& 

1274 Julia 1R?12 

320 Caledonia 24WfS)25 

2J0 Knickerbocker ...Jtidxtfe, 
50 Globe 4 V4 

4040 Utah 12. 

705 S Hill 12;V 

J6<l ErliD-e 15Wail6 

1295 Challenge I2ijail3 

505 Bait Con 7«@8 

575 Bacon 1 1@1 > 

27* Bullion I7^@i6 

275 Trench 16 

9511 Ptcw>u 70@«W 

100 Senator i 

4ft Dayton ■*&©>* 

IS35 Rfland 5K@d 

I'O D:irdannelles...; ,...22is 

715 Am Flat 7(dl7*6 

750 Union 95396 

610 Woodville 3#@Jj£ 



AITEBNOON SESSION. 
2690 Andes i 



This Week. 

■Wednesday, December 30. 
morntnq session. 

750 Alpha ...37M@35 

90 ....b30 40@3i 

80ft Belcher 54@RM 

6765 Bi B Wa.tr, 

525 ....b 5 BlSeS 

50 ....b30 7.64 

615 Chollar 8^@87 

1707 Crown Pt 48@0 

340 CG UiU 7@7J* 

560 Confidence - 44(5)45 

645 Con Vir 560(^70 

20 ....b 30 580 

670 California 460(3480 

10 ,...b 30 490 

730 D-ner 2W3t2 

8H0 Empire M 13'Oil4'» 

20*1 (i AC 52m IJ. 

380 H A=N 66(ff>6S 

510 Kentuck 22;*ta)23 

50 ...,b30 %% 

1920 Imperial 19(5)13 

50 ...b30 .23,1$ 

2215 Mexican 42'£@38 

10" ...-b30. 40w;4l 

920 Ophir.... 195(2188 

100 ....b 30. „&; 

300 ....b5 190@19S 

59i Savage 134(51137'': 

1260 S Nev 22to23 

20 ,...b30 .24 

J65 Y Jacket 162@16tt 

50 ....b 30 170 



..h5.. 



301) . 

190 Am Flag 2* 

1415 Belmont lft@lfi -. 

25 ....b3o 7r:..ie 

325 Cherry Creek. ...2->jWj27> 

ftOChMill „„7$ 

710 Caledonia 29(5)31 

■115 EuCon 16«C*16 

ION EldoS .2-V. 

10 Excheq 215 

285 J ustice 95<5)100 

2i'35 Julia 9(3jH> 

1100 Kossuth 2 ; V«'3 

805 L Wash IV'2 

1075 Ljdy Brvan (i 1 fi@H 

3 80 Leo l-iJta'jS 

■500 ....b30 ?.T.2 l 4 

2*5 M Val b%m 

20 Mahng tk 

350 Mint....; 455 

210 N-wark 75@87^c 

3119 NUtah llfi 

.50 NCarson 3 

820 Or.3H 176612 

710 Overman 84^8 

30 Pioche 3!* 

50 Prussian 311 

3HI RAElv 25Vf!fo26 

370 Rv Patch 3?feSMM 

5S ValW ^Tw 

700 S R I li-SOlTa 

99 Seg Bel I.#q)l60 

250 Succor 5,'|(aft 

150 Wash&C 75c 

50 War Eagle liij 

1610 Woodville 3m2\; 

700 Ward 3:5)3:, 



Wt 



INING SUMMARY. 



THE following is mostly condensed from journals pub- 
lished in i In' interior. >ri proximity to the mini: s mentioned. 



The new and powerful hoistirjg and pump 
iog machinery for tbe Silver Hill mine ia being 
placed in position as fast as it arrives, ■ 



California. 

AMADOR COUNTY. 

The Minks. — Amador Ledger, Dec. 26: Work 
isactively going on along the line of the 
Amndor canal, in opening up a number of 
heavy gravel claims, all of which as far as work 
has progressed, give very fluttering promise of 
rich returns when properly opened. Our 
quariz mines continue Lheir usual monthly 
yield without diminution, and the quartz mill- 
ing outlook for 1875 promises well. Valuable 
improvements have been made in connection 
with a number of nor qututz mines, aud others 
will soon follow. New mills have been erected, 
and others are in contemplation, and we think 
it safe to say the gold yield of the county in 
1875 will exceed that of any former year. We 
have huudieds of quartz ledges unprospected, 
many of which only require development to 
render them veiy valuable; while oar heavy 
gravel hills offer fine inducements to capital 
wiih an assurance of rich returns for cost of 
development. 

Quicksilver Sales. — Amador Dispatch, Dec. 
26: We. are informed that over a thousand 
shares in the Amador quicksilver mine were 
sold in this place last Saturday at $2.50 per 
share, Mr. S. W. Bright being the purchaser. 
We are also informed that the necessary ma- 
chinery for extracting the quicksilver from the 
ore has been purchased, and will be put in 
active operation as soon as possible. 
CALAVERAS COUNTY. 

Gwin Mine. — Calaveras Chronicle, Dec. 26 : 
Work is progressing favorably at the Gwm 
mine. The last sinking of 100 feet in the main 
shaft is nearly completed. When done the 
depth of 1000 feet will have been reached, the 
deepest shaft in the State,' we believe south of 
Amador county. Tbe batteries, 36 stamps, are 
kept running on rock taken from the 900-foot 
level, the yield beiug in every way satisfactory. 
So soon as the present sinking is completed 
another level, the 1000-foot, will be run, call- 
ing for the employment of a greater number of 
hands, and increasing the ore product. 

Splendid Clean-Up.— Mr. James Dnryea, 
proprietor of the well-known Chili Gulch hy- 
draulic, has recently made a general clean-up 
of the mine, preparatory to commencing the 
winter's campaign. We hear that the very 
handsome sum of ©21,000 represents the amount 
taken from tbe sluice-boxes. Toe claim is 
probably the-jnost productive of any of the 
southern mines. 

Red Sill. — Workmen are engaged tarring 
and placing in position the iron pipe that is to 



January a, 1875.] 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



convey wat*r to the Red Hill claim. When in- 
augurated this will be one of the moBt notable 
gravel mining enterpriser in the county, and 
we believe it will prove among the most remu- 
nerative. Work is being pressed forward an 
rapidly an possible with u view to huvjng every- 
thing in tetidinuhS for uctive operutiuii shortly 
after the holidays. 

We*t Point District. — Mina Rica continues 
to thold solid promises — The former Thoss 
mill was bought by parties, last week, who are 
now repairing mill and ditches — Mr. Gilbert, 
4 'the last of the Modocs," bought out the In- 
dians. Mr. Gilbert is now engaged in putting 
up a whim on the mine— Lone St it is turn 
ing out tine ore again — A working shaft has 
been commenced on the Josephine. At tbe 
depth of 12 feet the vein coutuins milling ore 4 
feet thick — A tine head of water hits been 
tapped in the G tod Faith tunnel. 
CONTRA COSTA COUNTY 

Mt. Diablo Qoicksilvei:. — t7».(r« Ooefa '•■t- 
zette, Dec, 26tb: It is naid tbat the new Quick- 
silver Mining company organized to work the 
ground of the old Welch company, near Clay- 
ton, have an ample working capital, and they 
are now putting up furnaces calculated to smelt 
12 tons ciunab<ir rock a day. From the report 
of reliable parties who bave been on the ground 
rec< ntly, we learn that the company have a 
large amount of rook awaiting tbe completion 
of the furnaces, all of which contains quicksil- 
ver, and some of it very rich. It is claimed 
tbat tbe rook now ready for smelting, although 
comnos d of croppings, or taken from near the 
surface, holds an average of from 30 to 50 per 
cent, of quicksilver, some of it going a-* high as 
80 per cent. We are inclined to doubt if so 
good a return will be realized from the smelt- 
ing, but there is still reason to believe, from 
the reports of disinterested persons who have 
inspected the rock already gathered, and that 
which has been uncovered— though no regular 
working has yet been opened, as we under- 
stand - that the company have a valuable 
quicksilver claim which can be very profitably 
worked. 

INYO COUNTY. 

Cos) District. — Inyo Independent, Dec. 19th: 
Geologically, the formation is just right to give 
assurance of deep mines with immense chim- 
neys of very hi^h trade ores. Some of the 
mines, with croppings perhaps 20 feet wide 
and assaying over §250 to the ton, are found 
near the crest of the hill or mountain, lying be- 
tween a hanging wall of limestone and upon a 
foot wall of porphyry, the later being tbe 
country rock to the eastward, and the other to 
the west These mines all run nearly north 
and south, as does the mouutuin upon which 
they are situated. The recorder's book shows 
seventy-seven locations, all of ledges, except a 
few water rights. Of this number there are 
about thirteen, either one of which is con- 
sidered of more promise than the famous Union 
of Cerro Gordo at the same stage of develop- 
ment. Taking the mines in the aggregate, there 
is abundant evidence that the bullion produc- 
tions of New Coso cau easily be made to more 
than double that of Cerro Gordo at any period 
up to the present. The ores, likewise, assay 
much higher, and are fully as easy of extrac- 
tion, while the locality and the several mines 
are much easier of access. 
MARIPOSA COUNTY. 

First Shipment to the Nkw Mining Camp. 
— Mariposa Gazelle, D«-c. 2G: The first ship- 
ment of supplies for "Reynold's Cove" passed 
through Mariposa on the "Flying Dutchman's" 
prairie schooner last Tuesday, being 5000 
pounds of freight. It consists of provisions, 
mining tools, a general assortment of supplies 
necessary for the commencement and prose- 
cution of mining and oiher projected enter- 
prises at the new locality. 

Reynold's Cove. — This place is situated on 
the main or middle fork of the Merced river, 
across the divide and opposite Kite's Cove, 
named from the discoverer of the celebrated 
Hite mine. From the statements of Mr. Ange- 
vine Reynolds, which are confirmed by the 
official map of County Surveyor Thomas, it 
appears that all the quartz veins cropping out 
at Hite's Cove are pitching at au angle of 35 to 
60 degrees toward the main river — it beingr, in 
an air line, about a mile and a half from river 
to river; consequently, a tunnel run in from 
the main fork, commencing at a point about 
2,000 feet from the river, as contemplated by 
the Reynold's company, would cut several 
veins of rich ore within a distance of 1,500 
feet. At the adit or mouth of the proposed 
tunnel is an outcrop, of -about CO feet in length, 
of a vein showing a thickness of two feet, 
upon which the company propose run- 
ning and extracting ore forthwith. In connec- 
tion with the mining location the company has 
secured a water right and mill privilege, which, 
in point of convenience and advantages, can- 
not be excelled in any of the mining districts 
•of California. Mr. P. C. Learned, the man- 
aging agent of the company, has been pur- 
chasing a complete outfit of supplies necessary 
for going ou with the contemplated work, 
which will probably be commneced on or 
about the first day of Januury. With the fav- 
orable adjuncts of an abundance of wood and 
timber and an excellent water power, together 
with an excellent outlook for extracting paying 
ore, the prospect is rather encouraging. 
MENDOCINO COUNTY. 

The Amarkillo Mine. — Napa Reporter, 
Dae. 26: John L. Cook, the locator of tbe Oak- 
land mine, writes us from Mendocino county, 
whither he has been called to superintend the 
opening of the Amarrillo mine in that county, 
and from which he has had the glory of ship- 



ping the first flask of quicksilver ever sont 
from that county. The mine is owned by Mr. 
Wise, a capitalist of Cloverdale, and bids fair 
to turn out a very remunerative one to its pro- 
prietor, especially, we think, as he is so fortu- 
nate iu a superintendent. Three tunnels are 
already iu, and the developments of rich cin- 
nab.ir ure large in each. They h»v<- one retort 
up, and will shortly erect more. This new dis- 
trict is showing borne fine ledges, and many 
claims are being located, with every prospect 
of proving as rich as those in Lake, Sonoma or 
Napa county. The Amarrillo mine is situated 
about twtdve miles north of Cloverdale, on the 
Ukiah road. 
NAPA COUNTY. 

Mining Items.— St. Helena Star, Dec. 24: 
We have the following from a friend, who 
hjis ju-t returned from a visit to Pope valley 
and its mines of quicksilver. The Phoenix has 
dropped into a No. 1 deposit of ere, of a 
character before unknown in the miue. It is 
rich cinnabar, interspersed with native quick- 
silver *o a large amount. On tbe part of the 
JEtna mine, they are for the present at rest as 
regards the furnace, but are getting ready to 
work their rich deposits in the early spring, 
both in the Vulley mine location aud also in 
tbe Silver Bow, where they have a large body 
of extra ore, as good as any that has ever been 
worked in the course of mining done in that 
valley. Geo. Porter and Harry Vivian have a 
uplendid prospect on the Oat hills at the head 
of James creek, and from specimens in our 
possession we judge they are all right. They 
have now two sixty foot tunnels and good 
bodies of ore in both. 

Calihtoga Mines.— Mr. Stuart, of the 
Knight's Valley ranch, is going to work on a 
new plau to save the disintegrated cinnabar at 
the Yellow Jacket mine. It is nothing more 
nor less than hydraulic mining just as they 
work placer diggings for fine gold. Everything 
will be reudy for a trial of the machine in a few 
days, and then down comes the mouutuius in 
tbe vicinity of Stuart's ranch. This i% as we 
understand it, an entirely new thing in quick- 
silver mining, if successful, will be the inaugu- 
ral of a new era in that branch. Culistoga has 
reason to be proud of her success as a mining 
town. During the month of November there has 
been shipped from this place over 40,000 
pounds of quicksilver, aud, as yet, the busi- 
ness has only begun. 
NEVADA COUNTY. 

New York Hill.— Foothill Tidithjs, Dec. 25: 
Last Friday night after our issue had gone to 
press, a rich strike was made in the New York 
Hill mine. Pay rock has Deeu coming out all 
along for three or four hundred feet in the 
lower tunnel. This strike was made in a cross- 
cut from this tunnel and at a point beneath, on 
the incline, a body of good ore in the upper 
tunnel.. Here are several hundred feet of good 
backs that may be considered "in sight," and 
as the richest of the rock now foupd was at the 
bottom, there's something big to go for below. 
On Saturday we examined a lot of specimens, 
weighing a hundred pounds or over, taken 
from the first car load of the strike, and placed 
on exhibition at the banking house of A. De- 
lano. It was nearly all so filled with gold as 
to be more valuable for jewelry than for mill- 
ing. The lot was estimated to be worth from 
$1,500 to $2, COO. Much fine ore has been 
taken out since, and the mine is now consid- 
ered past all doubt as to its future. The 
benefit to Grass Valley of this assurance of a 
good mine in New York Hill, maybe better 
appreciated after reading over the Idaho re- 
ports in this number of Tidings. 

Too cold for quicksilver to work well in 
amalgamating the gold — is the news from 
above and throughout the county. As we inti- 
mated last week.au ealy supply of water is 
seldom advantageous, us, for the reasons above 
given, miners can't work much before Febru- 
ary. 

Thk Omaha mine is said to be turning out 
good milling rock from a fair sized ledge, and 
the stockholders feel in good spirits. 

New Quartz Mill. —Nevada Transcript, 
Dec. 25: Hon. Jack Pelham and Mr. McDon- 
ald, of Grass Valley, some time since bought 
the Gaston Ridge mine, located midway be- 
tween Washington and Eureka, in this county. 
The ledge was worked several years ago, and 
although the rock was good.it failed to- pay 
dividends, from the tact of the imperfect facil- 
ities for working the rock and saving the gold. 
The present company have, during the past 
two months, had a new ten-stamp mill erected, 
and will thoroughly test the mine. We are in- 
formed by Mr. T. Looney, who will take 
charge of the mill, that the ledge is large and 
the rock looks well. The mill is completed, 
butjwill not Btart until after New Years. There 
is a large number of ledges in t the vicinity of 
this mine, and if it pays will be the means of 
starting up work on many of them 

plumas county- 
New Pluming Operations — Plumas Na- 
tional, Dec. 16: Mr. Charles Hambley informs 
us that a company has been organized to work 
Soda creek, above Soda bar, and work has al- 
ready been commenced. They will start at 
the river, put in a four-foot flume, and clean 
the creek as they go. The company will put 
up a portable sawmill, which will be used for 
manufacturing flume lumber, blocks, etc., and 
also to furnish the general demand for lumber 
in that section. Soda creek is thought to be 
very rich in places, and ihe new company pro- 
pose to "sw«ep it clean." 
SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY. 

Cambria Items. — San Luis Tribune, Dec. 19: 
The quicksilver interests still increases. Sev- 



eral parties ure herefrom the city iu search of 
mints; among whom is our former townsman, 
George Mowatt. George i;* a lively lad, aud 
evidently means bufdn6B8. Some parties ore 
uegoli itiug for tin* Gibson and Phillip*. This 
mine has one of the finest prOBpeotfl iu this 
district. The company have, however, been 
very uufortuuate in allowing third-rate men to 
dabble with its name. 
SIERRA COUNTY. 

Sloo Canyon.— Mountain Messenger, Dec. 26: 
The owner* of Slug canyon quartz mine have 
engaged a force of men to put their tunnels in 
order. There is undoubtedly a flue body of 
ore in this mine, if it were only properly de- 
veloped. A tunnel not to exceed 400 feet in 
length, would top the ledge several hundred 
feet in depth. 

Oao.— A cousid Table amount of stock in the 
Oro Gold Mining company has already been 
sold to parties in this place. There is no doubt 
but tbat enough will be disposed of to enable 
the building of a suitable mill. The company 
has a large amount of ore iu sight, ready to be 
taken out wb< u they Have any way for reduc- 
ing it. 

Claim Sold. — Col. Baker, of Gardiner's 
Point, has .-old his mining claim, including the 
Pioneer ground and several other claims, mak- 
ing tbe purchasers sure of having one of the 
bent hydraulic mines in the State. 

China Mining. — The China companies, three 
iu unuiber, are doing well. 

New Prospect. — Henry Yon Millen has 
btruck a good prospect on Lafayette ranch. 

Nevada. 

WASHOE DISTRICT. 

Phil Sheridan.— Gold Hill News, Dee. 24: 
West drift iu to-day 155 feet from the shaft. 
The face of the drift baa been driving into 
blue clay and quartz the last few days, with a 
constant increase of tbe quartz, and yesterday 
afternoon still more favorable material was met 
with. Iu the upper tunnel of this mine, 750 
feet above the level of the present workings, a 
large strong vein of solid quartz or low grade 
ore was developed, and this lower drift is 
probably about cutting the same vein. 

Consolidated Virginia. — Daily yield . 425 
tons. The ore breasts of the 1300 and 1400- 
foot levels, especially the latter, are looking 
splendidly. The winze below the 1550-foot 
level is sunk to a depth of 72 feet. This winze 
is now passing into the western formation, 
leaving the ore bodv to the eastward. The 
north drift on the 1550-foot level ia advancing 
toward the northern boundary line through ore 
of the highest grade. On the 1500-foot level, 
cross-cut No. 1 has already penetrated the ore 
body a distance of 65 feet. The quality of the 
ore exposed in this drift is very fine for the 
entire length of the opening. Cross-cut No. 2 
on this level is extended 265 feet through ore 
of steadily increasing value, and has not yet 
reached the east wall. Throughout the mine 
the ore stopes are yielding well and the quality 
of the ore is rich, 

Hale & Noeorosb. — The prospecting opera- 
tions in this mine are confined to Ihe lowest 
levels— the 2000 aud 2100-foot levels. On the 
2000-foot level the cross-cuts have been carried 
almost entirely across the ore vein without ex- 
posing Rood ore in sufficient quantity to justify 
its extraction. On the 2100 fuot level the north 
drift is advancing in the ore vein, and is now 
approaching a locality iu which ore is supposed 
to exist. 

Julia. — The shaft is now being sunk at the 
rate of 4 feet per day. It is now 1113 feet 
deep and the bottom in excellent working ground 
requiring no blasting, the material being 
quartz, porphyry, and clay. 

Florida. — Sinking at the bottom of the shaft 
is resumed and making good progress, the 
ground working well and water not interfering. 
The machinery works excellently, buta heavier 
engine, with the requisite boiler, is ordered for 
deeper working. 

Savagk. — Sinking the main incline makes 
the usual good progress, and some little im- 
provement is noticeable in the prospecting 
developments at the 2000-foot level. 

Gould & Curry.— On the 1700-foot level the 
north drift is advancing to unite with the 
winze in order to imp ova the ventilation, and 
thereby allow of thv thorough exploration of 
that level. The volume of water flowing from 
the east drift on the 1500 foot level does not 
increase and is easily removed. 

Justice. — The main drift is giving a fine 
showing of ore at present, with continued im- 
provement. Excellent assays are obtained 
from the face, aud very high ones from the west 
side of the drift. 

Original Gold Hill. — The northwest drift 
at the 340-foot level has assumed a north direc- 
tion, and shows low grade ore and porphyry iu 
its face. A cross-cut east, from it, is now in 
six feet, and shows pretty fair ore in its face, 
which improves as fuvther advance is made. 

Crown Point. — Daily yield, 500 tons, from 
"the old ore producing levels. Nothing new in 
the way of ore developments iu those sections; 
the breasts and stopes hold out excellently, and 
bid fair to do so for a long time to come. Pros- 
pecting is resumed at the 1500-foot level, east, 
in the south and middle cross-cuts, running 
farther east in order to see if pay ore cannot be 
found in that direction. 

Chollar-Potosi. — Daily yield, about 50 tons 
per day. The old ore sections show improve- 
ment in quality, with plenty of ore in sight as 
yet. Average car samples assay $30 per ion. 

East Belcheb. — The large *ew three-com- 
partment working shaft is being sunk at a good 
late of progress. 

Yellow Jacket. — The drifts both north and 



east at the 1740-foot level are making good pro- 
gress, and the north winze below the 1740-foot 
level is considerably encumbered with water. 

Sutro Tunnel. — Progressing at a very lively 
rate — about 15 feet per day. Rock works easily 
and water does not interfere. Those Burleigh 
drills do splendid execution. Total length of 
tunnel from mouth to header, 8013 feet to-day. 

Woodville. — The mill is kept steadily run- 
ning on ore from the 200 and 300-foot levels, 
and new ground is being opened below the 
300-foot level. 

Utah..— Gradiug for the new pumping ma- 
chinery is progressing favorably. Sinking the 
abaft will not be resumed until the new engines 
shall have been placed in position. 

Belcher.— Daily yield 450 tons of ore. The 
drift east from the 1500-foot station of the main 
incline, to open that level, is also going ahead 
well. Sinking the main incline goes ahead as 
usual, and it is to-day 50 feet below the 1500- 
foot level. The new air shaft is down 220 feet 
from the surface, aud the upraise portion of it, 
from th§ 850 -foot level, is np 120 feet. 

Ophir. — Daily yield, 240 tons, from the ore 
breasts and stopes of and between 1300 and 
lG45-foot levels, keeping 4 mills steadily run- 
ning. The cross-cut from the winze below the 
1645-foot level, near the California line, con- 
tinues in splendid ore; in fact there is plenty of 
rich ore in sight in the Ophir, and all the cross- 
cut and winze explorations simply go to show 
that the great bonaza extends downward and 
northward. The quality of the ore extracted 
during the past week was better than hereto- 
fore, giving much higher assays; therefore, the 
milling returns will be much better. 

Imperial Empire.— The cross-out at the 
2000-foot level is apparently near the ledge. Oc- 
casional flows of hot water are met with, and 
the drift is kept well timbered in anticipation 
of any heavy body of water that might be tap- 
ped iu cutting through the wall of the ledge. 

Bouk Island. — The indications thus far met 
with in this mine are very flattering, and Bhow 
very plainly that depth only U needed to find a 
good body of paying ore. 

Sierra Nevada. — Daily yield, 60 tons, prin- 
cipally from the old upper workings, keeping 
the company's mill running. 

Overman. — The 1100-foot station for a new 
level and drift to the ledge is now being opened. 
As soon as the 1100-foot station is well ad- 
vanced, sinking at the bottom of the Bhaft 
will be resumed. 

Leo. — The face of the north drift shows 
some stringers of very good ore, indicating that 
a large body of ore may be soon developed. 

Baltimore. — At the 750-foot level the seams 
of quartz in the face of the drift are widening 
and give high assays. 

Silver Hill. — The face of the south drift at 
the third level iB in fine looking quartz carry- 
ing considerable metal. The face of the south 
drift on the second level is in low grade red 
quartz ore the full width of the drift and still 
widening. 

Succor —The pump has been doing effective 
service, and the water being lowered suffi- 
ciently, work is resumed in the drift. 

Lady Bryan. — New shaft down to-day 373 
feet. The new pump is iu place, and assists 
progress very materially. The drifts for the 
ledge are going ahead well. 

California. — A shaft has been Btarted iu 
connection with the adjoining miue, the Con- 
solidated Virginia, at a point 1,040 feet east of 
the shaft of that mine. In the California, 
cross-drifts are now advancing towards the ore 
body on the 1400-foot level, at a point 200 feet 
north of the south line of the mine, and on the 
1500-foot level, 100 and 200 feef northerly from 
that boundary. It is expected that the ore 
body will be reached by these transverse drifts 
early in January. The richest ore develop- 
ments in the Consolidated Virginia are very 
close to the southern boundary of this mine, 
and their extent is yet undetermined. 

Mint. — Sinking the shaft for another level is 
making good progress. 

Nevada.— The good yield of ore from the old 
chimney of the upper workings continues, and 
the face of the lower tunnel is in low grade ore. 

Mexican. — The drift from the 1465-foot level 
of the Ophir to prospect this mine is going 
ahead, with nothing interesting to report as 
yet. 



A New ledge with a very promising appear- 
ance has been fouud on the south-western side 
of the ridge back of Pioche. The owners are. 
Murphy, Jones & Co. 

The necessary machinery for working the 
Amador quicksilver mine has been purchased, 
and will soon be put in active operation. 

It is estimated that the shipments of bullion 
from Utah Territory the past year amounted to 
$7,000,000. 

A Bed of coal has been discovered on Cham- 
bers' creek, near Stellacoom, Washington 
Territory. 

An inexhaustible Bupply of potter's clay has 
been discovered at Whatcom, Washington 
Territory. 



Adviccs from Banner mining district, San 
Diego county, say all the mills are running, and 
times are lively. 

The South Mountain Consolidated Mining 
company have contracted for 3,000,000 bushels 
of charcoal. 



The railroad company is negotiating for 
Moore & Parker's ooal mine, nearOarlin. 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



[January 2, 1875 



Development of the Iron Interest. 

A project for the development of the iron in- 
terests of this State savs the Calaveras Citizen 
has at last assumed definite [shape, and as soon 
as the necessary arrangements can be perfected 
active operations will be commenced. A com- 
pany of Eastern capitalists have purchased an 
iron mine in Shasta county, and their agent is 
now making preparations for putting up the ne- 
cessary works Cor manufacturing purposes. 
The company propose to erect their works - 
rolling mills, etc.— in Saoramento, provided the 
city will donate a site. A meeting of the citi- 
zens- of that place was held a few evenings since, 
to consider thereafter, at which money enough 
was subscribed to ensure the purchase and dona- 
tion of the location desired by the company. 
It is intended to manufacture steel rail as well 
as all other different varieties of iron for which 
there is a demand on this coast. 

The successful prosecution of this enterprise 
will result in incalculable benefit to the State. 
Besides giving employment to a great number 
of skilled hands and laborers, it will be but 
the beginning of the development of an indus- 
try that is certain to become one of the leading 
interests of the coast. But few people have a 
correct idea of the quantity of iron annually 
consumed in this State. It is estimated that 
§5,000,000 will not more than cover the yearly 
expenditure for that article— every pound of 
■which is now imported — $1,500,000 being paid 
out for the single item ot nails. This vast 
amount of money is taken out of the State to 
pay for that which can and ought to be pro- 
duced at home, a mode of doing business that 
for years has told heavily against the prosper- 
ity of California. The inauguration of iron 
manufacturing here .will J c top importation, in 
at least one very important particular, and en- 
courage the building up of a general system 
of manufactures that the State can never reach 
its full measure of prosperity without. We 
are not yet wholly acquainted with the pur- 
poses of the Eastern company. We do not 
understand whether they intend transporting 
the ore to Sacramento for reduction, or whether 
they will make pig at the mine and work the 
metal, simply, in the city. The cost of trans- 
portatisn will undoubtedly have much to do 
with settling that question, which, however it 
may be determined, will i n no way detract from 
the importance of the enterprise. 

We regret that Calaveras was not selected as 
the initial point for iron making. This county 
possesses a number of advantages over Shasta 
for the prosecution of that business which the 
Eastern company must have ' overlooked in 
choosing their location. An analysis of the 
Shasta aud Calaveras ores proves that the latter 
are the richer of the two, a fact that cannot be 
too strongly emphasized when it is considered 
that transportation is the chief item of expense 
connected with manufacture. There are un- 
limited quantities of hematic ores in this county 
that assay as high as sixty per cent. iron, while 
the best specimens from the Shasta field do 
not show above thirty-five per cent. This dif- 
ference in the quality of the ore is an advan- 
tage in favor of Calaveras, that can be scarcely 
be over-estimated, and it is strange that so im- 
portant a tact was lost sight of by those seeking 
the best place to engage in the manufacture of 
iron. Further than this, Calaveras is much 
more favorably located than Shasta for the 
successful production of iron, being nearer a 
market and closer to main thoroughfares of 
transportation. So far as the question of fuel 
is concerned no county in the State possesses 
advantages superior, if equal to Calaveras, and 
all other requisites for iron making are to be 
had in abundance. While we are sorry that 
Calaveras is not to have the honor of making 
the first ton of iron produced in the State, we 
have all the faith in the world that the time is 
not far distant when the county's resources, in 
that respect, will be developed. The success 
of the Shasta enterprise will stimulate research, 
and the great advantages of this county cannot 
be muoh longer overlooked. Calaveras needs 
but the unfolding of its latent resources to 
place it in the front rank of prosperous coun- 
ties, and we believe the development of the 
iron interest will be the first step taken in that 
direction. 

Babtlett Creek. — The Silver State says of 
this district: At present there are one hundred 
or more prospectors in the district, nearly all 
of whom have interests in one or more ruining 
locations. The hills abound in ledges, and 
new discoveries are made daily. A cut or 
trench 40 or 50 feet long at right angles with 
the CDurse of the veins is certain to strike one. 
But few of them crop out on the surface, the 
veins generally being what are called by miners 
"blind ledges." Bartlett creek at all seasons 
of the year is capable of running six or eight 
ten-stamp mills, all of which can be built 
within a few hundred yards of each other, as 
the stre rn runs through a steep canon and is 
exceedingly rapid. As a general thing the 
veins as tar as developed are small but exceed- 
ingly rich. The town of Varyville recently 
laid out contains three saloons and one store. 
Mr. Merchant is of the opinion that the mines 
are permanent, and that Columbia district 
will t>o one ot the liveliest in the country next 
spring. Eight or ten miles from Varyville is 
the newly located Snow Cieek distriot. 



Columbia District. 

The following, from G. F. Harris, a practical 
assayer, relative to Columbia mining district, 
in this county; we find in the Modoc Independent, 
a new paper just started at Dofris' bridge, Mo- 
doc county, California: The -Badger mine, 
owned by Messrs. Vary, Keating & Merchant, 
is fast developing into a valuable mine. The 
ledge has been tapped all along for a distance 
of 1,000 feet, and in each place exhibits a 
fine 'body of paying ore. Two shafts sunk 
on .the ledge to a depth of about- 60 feet 
only, strengthen the conclusion that the mine 
is one of immense wealth. An arastra belong- 
ing to the Badger has successfully worked 80 
tons or more, yielding a return of about ©4,000, 
and the tailings which remain are of sufficient 
value to pay for re-working. Mr; Vary has 
sold a one-third interest to a man named 
Bolinger, for $7,500, and the last-named gen- 
tleman has gone to San Francisco to procure 
a quartz mill, which he intends to put upon 
the ground at once, and his return was daily 
expected when I left (on the 15th instant). 
Mr. Johnson, from Silver City, as I was in- 
formed, was en route for the camp with his 
twostamp mill, and has arrived ere this if 
he met with no mishap. Messrs. Geary & 
Mathews, of the Kosedale, No. 1, had made a 
good strike in that claim, and had shipped 
about one ton of ore to the Winnemucca mill 
as a test. Judging from several assays made 
of the rock by myself, I place its value at 
from $40 to $60 a ton. The Eosedale claim, 
No. 2, owned by Mr. Keating, Campbell, my- 
self and others, is of very much the same char- 
acter of ore as the ciaim described, and is be- 
yond gainsay a true fissure. The vein has 
been uncovered at intervals of a few yards for 
several hundred feet, and shafts show it prop- 
erly in its casing. The encasement of the vein 
on its eastern or hanging wall, is a soft mica- 
ceous granite which the gorge follows, while 
the western or foot-wall is a quartzose grauite 
of a more stubborn nature. The gouge or vein 
ribbon that follows the hanging-wall, is a calyx 
putty or clay, which we are led to believe never 
exists except in true fissures. 

The base metals, copper, galena and anti- 
mony, appear in small -quantities, and the most 
remarkable feature of this ore consists in these 
metals always appearing separate and distinct 
from each other, and from the gold. The ga- 
lena and autimony, however, seem to carry the 
greater part of the silver. Thus an expert can 
easily separate the free milling ore from the 
baser with his eye. There are several other 
claims which might be mentioned as of prom- 
ising value, and in fact may prove the most 
valuable of all, but as the development of each 
has not gone far enough to admit of an opin- 
ion, I will in this connection only express a 
wish for their future prosperity. 



City Mining. 

The Mountain Democrat says:'There are very 
few town lots in Placerville proper but have 
been mined out and filled in onoe, twice, thrice 
or oftener, but within the past week we have 
noticed quite a lively revival in this line. 
Chinese companies pay an agreed sum for the 
privilege of mining out a town lot, leaving the 
buildings thereon intact by underpinning and 
propping them up, and after the gold is all 
washed out the lots are filled up by turning in 
the water and depositing the sediment from 
other mines above. For these mining privi- 
leges in town lots, very respectable prices are 
sometimes paid. Companies are now at work 
in the lumber-yard lot of Jones & Co., lower 
Main street, in Limpinsel's lot, on Main street, 
above Bedford Avenue, and in the Burns' 
dwelling-house lot, on Main street, just above 
Ijimpens9l's. The privilege of mining the 
Jones lot sold for $1,000; the same privilege 
on the Burns lot sold for $350, and Limpensel 
also obtaiued a good price, though he has not 
made it public. Negotiations are pending for 
a lot 107 bv 167 feet at the lower end of Main 
street, $2,000 being the present owner's bed- 
rock price. If the code and the law officers of 
the county would permit it, there are well 
posted old residents, principally business men, 
who would give a handsome sum for the priv- 
ilege of mining out Main street from Jones' 
corner to the Central House, Coloma street, 
from the upper corner of our office to Main 
street, and Sacramento street from the corner 
of Main to a short distance above Dunn's 
blacksmith shop. This would include the 
width of the streets for a distance of about 300 
ynrds. Responsible parties have offered 
$10,000 for the privilege of mining out this 
ground, obligating themselves to leave the 
streets in an improved condition, with a large 
and substantial sewer the whole distance, which 
would much improve the adjacent property. 
From results obtained in digging cisterns and 
otherwise, those best qualified to judge are 
confident that not less than $100,000 could be 
made in thus mining out the portions of streets 
above indicated. 



Prospecting Northward. 



New Oregon Mines. 

An excitement is raging with regard to a re- 
cently discovered quartz ledge, situated in Jo- 
sephine county, Oregon, at or near the junc- 
tion of Galice creek with Rogue river. This 
place is a little to the west of Jacksonville, and 
distant therefrom about fifty or sixty miles. 
The Jacksonville Times has the annexed on 
the subject: 

"The excitement consequent upon the dis- 
covery of the quartz mines at Galice oreek 
seems to be on the increase. Several of our 
citizens have left for that section to see what 
Drospeot there is of "making their pile." Par- 
ties from other parts of the State are also arriv- 
ing upon the scene, among whom are Judge J. 
H. Reed and W. H. West, of Portland. Judge 
Reed formerly owned some placer mines on the 
creek, but, we believe, sold them a. short time 
ago. The ledge is of immense proportions, 
some saying it can be traced for twenty-five 
miles, while its width is estimated as high as 
two hundred feet, with a depth of 500 feet in 
sight. The/ assays of ore from this ledge, made 
by various assayers on this coast, speak favor- 
ably for its richness. We understaud that it 
is the intention of Mr. Courtney, one of the, 
persons interested, to ship below for milling a 
few tons of this rock, so as to fully test its 
value and ascertain if the ore 'is refractory or 
not. This movement will be necessarily re- 
tarded some time, as, owing to the rough 
roads, it is impossible to do so now. Should 
these discoveries prove as rich and extensive as 
we have cause to believe, money will be more 
plentiful than ever before, for there is enough 
for all. Jackson and Josephine counties can- 
not be benefitted more by any enterprise than 
by the successful working of these mines. 



Already are our prospectors pushing north- 
ward, as we a few days since predicted would 
be the case. Making the Ophir mine the oen- 
ter of the Comstock, there has as yet been but 
little real prospecting done to the northward. 
Southward we see lines of fine hoisting works 
extending a distance of two or three miles, 
while to the northward we have onl.v the works 
of the Sierra Nevada and the Utah companies. 
These are the only companies north of the 
Ophir where' steam hoisting works are in oper- 
ation, and are the only companies that have 
shafts of any considerable depth. The grand 
rush of prospecting companies has always 
heretofore been to the southward. Now it 
seems that the north end of the lead is to be 
looked after. In taking a drive to the race- 
track, three miles north of town, yesterday, 
we observed men at work in several places. 
Even out beyond the toll house, where we turn 
from the Geiger grade to go down into the val- 
ley in which the race-course is situated, we saw 
men at work in long, open cuts, throwing dirt 
right and left, like so mauy gophers. They 
seemed bound to head off the big bonanza 
should it be found to be coming in that direc- 
tion. Still, beyond these, were to be seen on 
the hilljsides signs of mining operations. Next 
spring we shall doubtless see work resumed 
and earnestly prosecuted in all the old shafts 
and tunnels, and some valuable discoveries 
may result. It is beginning to be apparent that 
just when we thought we knew all about the 
great mineral belt in which the Comstock lode 
is the principal feature, we knew next to 
nothing of the Comstock itself. Had we known 
three months ago what we now know, many of 
us might now be in possession of millions 
where we have not dollars. This beiog the 
case the work of sinking shafts and making ex- 
plorations in the mineral belt should be 
encouraged. The surface looks the same to 
the northward, where men are now just begin- 
ning to dig, as it does over the Ophir, Califor- 
nia and Consolidated Virginia claims. The 
ground that meets the eye as we walk over it 
looks equally common and valueless. In the 
silver-bearing belt valuable discoveries are 
liable to be made, even in excavating a cellar 
or digging a well. — JSnterpiise. 



Napa County Mines. 

The St. Helena Star says: The year ap- 
proaching to a close has been one of general 
prosperity to Napa county. The returns from 
the agricultural and new mining districts of 
the county have been of a much more satis- 
factory character than anticipated, which is 
well, because it is seldom that we get more of 
this world's goods tban we expected. Crops 
of all varieties have been abundant, and prioes, 
as a general thing, have ranged liberal and in 
some oases high, thereby acting as a blessing 
to the producer, and also standing off the back- 
sets of previous bad years, and encouraging him 
to make the ooin "float," conferring, as it 
were, to the community at large a general ben- 
efit. Indications for a* continuance of our min- 
ing and agricultural prosperity, to say theleaBt, 
are actually of that character, wherein one is 
apt to say "you flatter me." As yet there is 
no evidence to dispute the assertion; we have 
had copious rains, promising excellent pastur- 
age; an important advantage to live-stock hold- 
ers at this season of the year, while a large area 
of soil has been turned up for sec-ding, which, 
in many cases, has already been done. With 
the rains, common to this month, crops will get 
an earlier start, thus lessening the contingen- 
cies at the tail end of the season. The condi- 
tion of things thus assured is an item of vast 
importance. 

The mining industries of the county have, 
to no little degree, contributed to our general 
prosperity. By close figures we fiud that, since 
spring, there has been something like $300,000 
brought into the county in the shape of mining 
machinery, and that over $2,000,000 of dollars 
has been paid to our mining population, muoh 
of which has found circulation in this county, 
in a general way benefitting everybody. Of 
course not directly, but like the air we breathe, 
we feel its life. 

A knowledge of this state of facts inspires 
encouragement to all classes. The more plen- 
tiful supply of money has already the effect of 
producing lower rates of interest. One per 
cent, per month is now quite sufficient, where, 
last year at this period, one and a half ruled as 
easy. 

The amount of building and improvements 
consummated and going on surpasses anything 
of the kind that has in one year been attempted, 
affording constant employment to mechanics 
aud laborevs at remunerative prices, which, in 
turn, has stimulated all branches of trade. 
Trade throughout the county was never on a 
more healthy basis. Merchants are laying in 
large stocks to meet the prospective demand 
of the holidays, and all this comes of the pros- 
perity enjoyed during the year and the kind in- 
dications which foreshadow the next. 



The celebrated Jersey mine, in Jersey dis- 
trict, has beeu sold for $3 .1,000 to Sacramento 
smelting works. Jersey district is situated in 
Humboldt county, about forty miles southwest 
of Galena. 



Pancake Mountain Coal. — A large specimen 
of coal from Pancake mountain was brought 
by G. D. Howell to this office to day. The 
specimen is of a good quality, and we should 
judge far superior to the Mt, Diablo article. 
It burns freely and leaves a clear, white ash. 
It is evidently a combination of anthraoitic 
and bituminous, and for the manufacture of 
coke is said to equal the best Pittsburg candle 
coal. At the depth of 400 feet the vein is 34 
inches in width, well defined and solid, and ap- 
pearances indicate an extensive and valuable 
deposit. There are seventy-five tons already 
on the dump, and the pile is being increased at 
the rate of about four tons per day. Experi- 
ments in the manufacture of coke have been 
entirely successful, and arrangements are being 
made by the company for the manufacture of 
the article upon an extensive scale. — Eureka 
Sentinel. 



Of Doubtful Practicability. — The main 
feature of a new plan for raising sunken ships 
is closing hermetically the hatches and all 
openings in the upper parts, and then pumping 
down air through tubes inserted through the 
bottom. The air thus introduced rises toward 
the under side of the deck, and not being able 
to escape, presses the water down and out 
through the holes in the ship's bottom. The 
vessel by this means will be rendered buoyant 
and rise to the surface. It is obvious, however, 
that in order to insnro success, it will be nec- 
essary to seal up the deck and upper part of 
the vessel so thoroughly that no air can escape. 
We do not believe that this can be done at 
moderate cost, and if it were done we feel cer- 
tain that the straining and raoking of the ves- 
sel would open the seams, let out the air and 
undo all that had been done. — Indus. Monthly, 



The New MrNE. — The new Mexican mine on 
the Comstock, though still a portion of the 
original Ophir ground, has no connection with 
the old mine ol the same name, but is simply 
the north division of the Ophir. This hereto- 
fore comprised 1,275 feet, but it is now divided, 
giving the Mexican 600 feet, and the Ophir 675 
feet. The Mexican has 168 shares to the foot, 
and Ophir 150, or 149 shares and a fraction to 
the foot. By this -division, the holders of 
Ophir receive a stock dividend of one share of 
Mexican to each of their shares of Ophir. The 
Ophir has the cream of the thiug, that is to say, 
it has all the ore thus far discovered and be- 
longing to the recent rich developments; but 
this is expected to extend into, and perhaps be- 
yoDd the Mexican. The name of the new stock 
as it appears on the quotations of the Board, 
has a familiar look to old residents, who re- 
member the time when in describing the dis 
covery of ore of the highest grade, it was only 
necessary to say "it is almost as rich as the 
Mexican." 



Bull Kun and Cornucopia.— From Ben. 
Painter, a Nevada pioneer, who arrived here a 
few days ago from Bull Kun, we learn the fol- 
lowing: The Blue Jacket mill is rapidly ap- 
proaching completion. The miue has been 
tapped by a tunnel several hundred feet lower 
than the old works, and at the point of inter- 
section carries two feet of high-grade ore. At 
Cornucopia the new mill had steamed up for 
the first time, last Wednesday, though the mill 
will not commence crushing ore for eight or 
ten days yet. Painter came down for a load of 
provisions, and expects to start homeward to- 
morrow. He says the roads are in excellent 
condition. — Silver State. 



Fastening Ikon in Stone. — A writer strongly 
recommends the use of zinc instead of lead for 
fastening iron railings- into Btone. It is well 
known that iron cemented with lead is con- 
sumed by rust very rapidly and destroyed. The 
zinc, however, establishes a galvanic circuit 
with the iron, and being positive to the iron, 
constrains all the chemical action and becomes 
oxydized, while no rust forms upon the iron. 
With lead the opposite takes place. It makes 
also with iron a galvanic combination, but the 
iron being positive oompared with the lead, it 
undergoes the chemical action, is oxalized, and 
protects the lead at its own expense. 



Marking Tools. — Much trouble can often be 
saved by marking tools with their owners' 
names, which can easily be done in the follow- 
ing manner: Coat over the tools with a thin 
layer of wax or hard tallow, by first warming 
the steel and rubbing on the wax warm until it 
flows, and let it cool. When hard, mark your 
name through the wax with a graver, and apply 
aquafortis (nitric acid); after a few moments, 
wash off the acid thoroughly, and wipe it off 
with a soft rag. The letters will be found 
etched into the steel. 



January 2, 1875.] 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



Qood H B 4 L TH- 



Washing Out the Stomach. 

Dr. C. Ewald, of Berlin, describes a method 
of washing out the stomuch, which, ou account 
of it* great simplicity seems likely to make tbe 
topical treat m< ut of diseases of the *doumcb, 
especially in < as a of poisoning, much more 
common: "A piece 01 ordinary iudia rubber 
tubing, such as is used for gas-lamps, abuut 
six feet lout,', is used. One end is rounded 
with scis-ors, and, if neot ssary, two holes are 
cut at a short distance from the end. This 
tube poss^sts quite sufficient rigidity to be 
passed without difficulty into the stomach. To 
the outer end a funuel is tin d, into whiuh cm 
be poured either water or a solution of soda, 
etc., according to circumstances. If the con- 
tents of tbe stomach are to be removed the 
outer end of the tube must be sunk to the level 
of the pubes, or even lower; then the patient 
must make a short but forcible contracliou of 
tbe abdominal walls. By this meaus the tube 
is filled to its highest poiut with the contents of 
the stomach, and becomes a siphon; the liquid 
continuing to flow until there is no more, or 
till the tube is stopped. 

This lust seldom occurs, if the tube be of a 
moderate calibre, ghould it, however, happen, 
or the abdominal pressure be insufficient to 
fill the tube in the first instance, or the patient 
be insensible, or any similar difficulty arise, it 
can, In general, be readily overcome by fitting 
a common clyster-syringe to tbe eud of the 
tube, one stroke from the pistou of which is 
generally sufficient to remove the obstacle. 

The Hourly Death Bate. — Dr. Lawson, an 
English physician, has recently published some 
curious observations regarding the time of the 
day when the greatest and least number of 
deaths occur. He fiuds, from tbe study of tbe 
statistics of several hospitals, asylums, and 
other institutions, tbat deaths from chronic dis- 
eases are most numerous between the hours of 
eight and ten in the morning, and fewest be- 
tween like hours in the evening. Acute deaths 
from continued fevers and pneumonia take 
place in the greatest ratio either in the early 
morning, when tbe powers of life are at their 
lowest, or iu the afternoon, when acute disease 
is most active. The occurrence of those defi- 
nite daily variations in the hourly death rate is 
shown, in tbe case of chronic diseases, to be 
dependent on recurring variations in the ener- 
gies of organic life; and in tbe case of acute 
diseases, the cause is ascribed either to the ex- 
istence of a well marked daily extreme of bodily 
depression, or a daily maximum of intensity of 
acute disease. 



Simple Dyspepsia Remedies. — Dyspepsia 
arises from a great variety of causes, and dif- 
ferent persons are relieved by different reme- 
dies, according to tbe nature of the disease and 
condition of tbe stomach. We know of a lady 
who has derived great benefit from drinking a 
tumbler of sweet milk — the richer and fresher 
the better, whenever a burning sensation is ex- 
perienced in the stomach. An elderly gentle- 
man of our acquaintance, who was afflicted for 
many vears with great distress after eating, has 
effected a cure by mixing a tablespoontul of 
wbent bran in half a tumbler of water, and 
drinking it half an hour after his meals. It is 
necessary to stir quickly and drink immedi- 
ately, or the bran will adhere to the glass and 
become pasty. Coffee and tobacco are proba- 
bly the worst substances persons troubled with 
dyspepsia are in the habit of using, and should 
be avoided. Regular eating of nourishingplain 
food, and the use of some simple remedies like 
the above, will effectin most cases quicker cures 
than medicine. — Scientific American, 

Nelaton's Treatment of Bcils. — A French 
medical journal says that Nelaton for more 
than 20 years prescribed the use of alcohol for 
the prevention of these smaller abscesses 
which are so common among young people and 
which so seriously impair the beauty of the 
face. It appears that this treatment is now 
extending. In speaking of boils and outward 
abscesses, and other inflammations of the epi- 
dermis and of the derma," he observes that as" 
soon aB the characteristic circular redness ap- 
pears on any part of the body, whatever may 
be its size, with a point rising in the middle, 
making it a grayish white, a thimbleful of cam- 
phorated alcohol should be poured into a 
saucer; the palm of the hand should be wetted 
with it and this should be rubbed with gentle 
friction over the affected place. The fingi-rs 
should be again steeped, and the friction con- 
tinued as often as eight or ten times every half 
minute. The place should be well dried and 
before covering it. up a little camphorated olive 
oil should be applied to prevent the evapora- 
tion of the fluid. 



Red Wall Paper Dangers. — To the dangers 
due to the arsenic entering into the pigment 
used in staining green wall paper, must now 
be added others produced by coralline dye em- 
ployed in the coloring of red hangings. It ap- 
pears that the poisonous symptoms (extending 
to acute eruptions of the body, when under 
garments thus dyed are worn, and to eye dis- 
eases in papered rooms) are owing not directly 
to the coralline, since recent experiments have 
proved tbe substance to be harmless, but to an 
arsenical mordant used to fix it. This last acts 
as a poison, both topically upon the skin, 
through contact with garments, and also by its 
dust and vapors, disengaged from the stuffs 
which it colors. 



Health and Marriage. 

Mr. Francis Gallon, of the Royal Institution 
{Eng.) in some late remarks before that body 
ou the healthy nature of scientific work, made 
a brief allusion to the importance of regard to 
consiitnntioual heulth on the part of parties 
contracting marriage. "It is positively start- 
liug," said Mr. G. iu referring to certain spe- 
cial health returns, "to observe 'n them statis- 
tics of tbe strongly heriditary character of good 
aud indifferent constitutions." He finds rea- 
son to believe that marriages of unhealthy moil 
and women are not unfrequent; and he adds: 
"These returns seem to show that the issue of 
snob marriuges are barely capable of pushing 
their way to the front ranks of life. All statis- 
tical data concur in-proving 1h.1t healthy per- 
sons are more likely to have healthy progeny; 
aud this truth cannot be too often illustrated, 
until it has taken such a hold of tho popular 
miud that considerations of health and energy 
shall be of recognized importanee in questions 
of marriage, so much so as tbe more imme- 
diately o* vious ones of rank and fortune." 

Mr. Gallon is quite right* aud the truth 
which he thus puts forward is one of tho high- 
est importance. If ptople would only remem- 
ber tbat for the most part they may choose 
whether their families shall be healthy, active 
and energetic, or not, much of tbe helplessness 
and misery which now afflict the nations of the 
earth would disappear. 



How to Avoid Colds.— An editorial in tbe 
British Medical Jounutl, on catching cold, con- 
cludes thus : The practical considerations 
which are the outcomes of this review of path- 
ology of colds are these: Never wear wet 
clothes after active muscular oxertion has 
ceased, but change them at once; to meet 
the loss of tho body heat by warm fluids and 
dry clothes; to avoid long sustained loss of heat 
which is not met by inoreased production of 
heat; to increase the tonicity of the vessels of 
the skin by cold baths, etc., so educating them 
to contract readily on exposure, by a partial 
adoption indeed of the "hardening" plan; and 
to prevent the inspiration of cold air by the 
mouth by some protecting agent, as a respira- 
tor. We can readdy understand how a respir- 
ator should be an effective protection against 
winter bronchitis in those so disposed. 



Use^Ul I^qk^^jeon. 



Reduction of Obesity. 

An exchange says: "Obesity is made the 
subject of an interesting article in the Journal 
des Connaissances Medicates, by Dr. Corlieu. 
Dr. Banting's system of cure consists, as is 
pretty generally known, in abstaining from 
bread, butter, milk, sngar and potatoes; taking 
about five ounces of beef, mutton, fish, or 
bacon, for breakfast, with a large cup of tea 
without either milk or sugar, and with an 
ounce of biscuit or toast; for dinner, about six 
ounces of any fish except salmon; of any kind 
of meat exclusive of pork, and of any vegetables 
save potatoes. Game, fowls, pudding, cham- 
pagne, port and beer, forbidded. 

Another method is described in the article 
before us as tried by a physician, Dr. Philbert, 
who was himself the patient. At the age of 
twenty-six he weighed three hundred and ten 
pounds, and measured four feet ten inches 
around the abdomen. His sleep was heavy, 
his pulse irregular at seventy-two per minute, 
his appetite and digestion were good. Having 
placed himself under the care of Dr. Schiudler, 
at Marinbad, Bohemia, he treated him as fol- 
lows: Get up at six in the morning; from half- 
past six to seven take three glasses (six 
ounces each) of the Kreutzbunn spring; from 
half past seven to eight, two boiled eggs and a 
cup of tea, and a small roll; from nine to ten, a 
vapor bath daily, the first perspiration being 
followed by friction with a gloved hand and a 
cold douche; the second by rubbing with a soft 
flesh-brush; the third, by flagellation with a 
bundle of poplar twigs with their leaves on, 
then a second doudie of cold water. On leav- 
ing the bath rubbing the body with vinegar. 
After the bath, a walk. At eleven a. m., two 
dishes of meat or fish, one of vegetables, boiled 
fruit without sugar, half a bottle of wine, and 
two small rolls. From noon to six a perma- 
nent stay in the forest surrounding tbe town, 
walking as much as possible without fatigue. 
At six, a dish of cold meat, boiled fruit as 
above, half a bottle of wine and a roll of bread. 
A walk after this dinner. At eight, shampoo- 
ing with soap; half an hour later to bed. Morn- 
ing and evening, five alkaline pills. 

The treatment lasted six weeks, at the end of 
which he had lost thirty-five pounds. He then 
continued the cure at home, with the Marien- 
bod waters for a fortnight, and afterward went 
to Fontainebleau in order to eat two pounds of 
grapes gathered on the spot, every morning 
fasting. At the end of two months he had re- 
duced his weight to two hundred and fifty-six 
pounds, and has since come down to one hun- 
dred and eighty pounds, enjoying excellent 
health. 

Natubal Antiscorbutics. — General Sherman 
says that the agava Americana, or Spanish bay- 
onet, the fruit of the common prickly pear, 
aud the succulent leaves of some of the varie- 
ties of the cactus that abounds on the deserts 
of Texas, New Mexico and Arizona, fnruish ex- 
cellent specifics for that horrible disease, the 
scurvy. 



Structure of a Cow's Horn. 

It is very frequently the case that in the 
commonest, most uniuviting of objects, we 
may see (if we like) beautiful exomples of 
engineeripg skill. A few days since, says Mr. 
Frank Bnckland in Land and Wattr, I was In- 
spcottng the large tanneries of the Means. 
llamlyu at Buckfastleigh, on the River Dart, 
Devonshire. Iu one of tho b*ck yards was a 
mountain of the skulls and horns of oows of all 
sorts and kinds. Horo there was a treasure 
worthy of investigation; so I got on to the 
mountain of horns aud skulls, and picked out 
some beautiful specimens which Mr. Hamlyn 
kindly ^ave me, iu order to make sections, etc. 
I find that over the brain of the cow a strong 
rouf of bono is thrown in the shape of an arch, 
so as to form a substantial foundation for the 
horns. This roof is not solid, but is again 
strengthened below by a series of bony arches, 
that are so distributed as to form a series of 
hollow chambers, thus formiug a structure 
uniting Htrength with lightness. 

The problem now is, how to fasten the horn 
on each side on to this buttress. The horn 
itself must of course be formed of horn proper, 
i e., hardened hair. In the rhinoceros, we find 
a horn composed entirely of a solid mass of 
what is really a bunch of hair agglntiuatcd 
together; but this kind of horn would have 
been much too heavy for the cow's convenient 
use. What is to bo doue? Why, hollow out 
the center of tbe horn of course; but stay — this 
will not do, because how is the horn to be sup- 
plied with blood-vessels?— in fact, how is it to 
grow? Let us see how it is done by the great 
Designer. 

Cut the horn right across with a saw, and you 
will find inside another horn, only mado of 
bone. If the section is made about one-third 
of the way down the length of the horn, you 
will be able to pick out a piece of bone in the 
shape of a cone, on which, or rather round 
which, the horn proper has shaped itself. This 
bouo fits the cavity with the greatest accuracy; 
it is as light as the thinnest paper, and yet as 
strong as a cone of tin. It is everywhere per- 
forated with holes, which in life contained the 
nerves, the veins and arteries, and we know a 
cow has all these in her horns; nerves proved 
by the fact that cows do not like their horns 
touched, and that they can scratch a fly off their 
hides with the top of the horn; arteries and 
veins, proved by the fact that a horn when 
broken will bleed, and that the horn of a living 
cow feels quite warm when held in the hand, 
besides whuh the nerves aud arteries form a 
union between the internal core of bone and 
the external covering of horn proper. 

If we now cut the rest of tbe horn into sec- 
tions we shall find that the inside of the bony 
part is really hollow, but that very strong but- 
tresses of bone are thrown about every inch or 
so, across the cavity of the horn in such a man- 
ner as to give it the greatest possible support 
and strength. I have cut a cow's horn and 
skull into several sections to show these but- 
tresses of bone, and now tbat the preparation 
is finished I have another specimen to show 
that there is design and beauty in all created 
objects. 

Chinese India Ink. 

Although the Chinese prepare their ink from 
the kernel of someamygdalaceous fruit, yet, by 
the aid of our present chemical appliances we 
are able to produce a composition in no way in- 
ferior to the best Chinese iuk, by the adoption 
of a formula which is given in Kiffault's 
treatise on the '-'Manufacture of Colors." The 
following is the formula: 

Calcined lampblack, 100 parts; hogshead 
shale black, in impalpable powder, 50 parts; 
indigo carmine, in cakes, 10 parts; carmine 
lake, 5 parts; gum arabic (first quality), 10 
parts; purified oxgall, 20 parts; alcoholic ex- 
tract of musk, 5 parts. 

The gum is dissolved in 50 to 60 parts pure 
water, and the solution filtered through a cloth. 
The indigo carmine, lake, lampblack and shale 
black are incorporated with this liquor, and 
the whole ground upon a slab with a mnller, in 
the same manner as ordinary colors; but in 
this case the grinding takes much longer. 
When the paste is thoroughly homogeneous 
the oxgall is gradually added, aud then the 
alcoholic extract of musk. The more the black 
is ground the finer it is. The black is then 
allowed to dry in the air until it has acquired 
sufficient consistency to be molded into cakes, 
which in their turn are still further dried in the 
air, out of the reach of dust. When quite 
firm these cakes are compressed in bronze 
molds, having appropriate designs engraved 
upon them. The molded ink is then wrapped 
in tinfoil, with a second envelope of gilt paper. 
The ink which has been prepared in this man- 
ner possesses all the properties of the real Chi- 
nese article. Its grain is smooth; it flows very 
well, mixes perfectly with many other colors, 
and becomes so firmly fixed to the paper that 
other colors may be spread over it without 
washing it out. 

Useful Information. — It is sometimes use- 
ful to know how to dissolve silver withont at- 
tacking copper, brass or German silver, so as 
to remove the silver from silvered objects, 
plated ware, etc. A liquid for the purpose ia 
simply a mixture of nitric acid with six parts 
of sulphuric, heated in a water bath to 106 deg. 
Fah., at which temperature it operates best. 
By this means the old silver attached to plated 
ware, old daguerreotype plates, etc., may be 
removed and saved without necessity for wast- 
ing acids in dissolving a large amount of use- 
less motaj. 



Domestic Eco^o^y 

How to Cook Turkeys and Chickens. 

Roast Turkey.— A turkey should be well 
singed and cleaned of pin feathers; then draw 
the inwards. Be sure you take everything out 
tbat is inside. Dip the turkey into eold water ; 
dean the gizzard, liver, heart and neck; let alt 
soak one hour if you havo time. Wash all 
very clem; wipe the turkey very dry inside 
aud out. Make a dressing of two cupfuls of 
bread crumbs, one teaspoonful of Bait, two 
large spoonfuls of sweet marjoram, two spoon- 
fuls of butter, one egg and mix them well to- 
gether. Cut the skin of the turkey in the back 
part of the neck, that the breast may look 
plump; fill the breast with the force-meat and 
sew it up. If you have any more forcemeat 
than is required for the breast, put the remain- 
der into the body and skewer tbe vent, tie the 
legs down very tight, skewer the wings down 
to the sides, and turn the neck on to the baok 
with a strong skewer. Baste with salt and 
water once, then frequently with butter; fifteen 
minutes before dishing, dredge with a little 
salt and flour, and basto with butter for the 
last time. This will give a fine frothy appear- 
ance and add to the flavor of the turkey. 

To make gravy, put the gizzad, neck and 
liver, into a saucepan with a quart of water, a 
little pepper, salt and mace; put it on the fir e 
aud let it boil to about half a pint. When 
done, braid up the liver very fine with a knife, 
and put it back into the water it was boiled in; 
then add the drippings of the turkey and a lit- 
tle flour, and give it one boil, stirriug it all the 
time. Dish the gizzard with the turkey. Al- 
low twelve minutes to a pound for the time to 
roast a turkey. A turkey weighing ten pounds 
requires two hours to roast with a clear fire, 
not too hot. Turn the spit very often. 

Boiled turkey is prepared the same aB for 
roasting, except in the dressing. Put in pork, 
chopped very fine, instead of butter. In truss- 
ing, turn the wings on the back instead of the 
sides, as for roasting; flour a cloth well, pin 
up the turkey tight, put it into boiling water 
where one or two pounds of salt pork have 
been boiling for some time; let this boil with 
the turkey : and dish the pork with tho turkey 
on a separate dish, with some parsley. Serve 
with oysters. or celery sauce. A turkey weigh- 
ing eight pounds requires an hour and a half 
to boil. 

IIoast Chickens. — Dress and roast the same 
as a turkey. A pair of chickens weighing six 
pounds require an hour and a half to roast. 
Make the gravy the same aB for a turkey, ex- 
cept the mice, which is to be ommitted. 

Boiled Chickens. — Dress and boil the same 
as a tuikey, Some cooks do not stuff boiled 
chickens or turkeys; but the dressing adds as 
much to the boiled as to the roast. Fork boiled 
with chickens is very necessary. A pair of 
chickens require from one to two hours to boil, 
depending upon the size and age. — Ohio 
Farmer. 



Blowing Meat.— Dr. Yeld, medioal officer of 
health for Sunderland, England, has presented 
a memorial to the health committee of that 
town against the "blowing and stuffing of 
meat.' 7 The practice of "blowing" is described 
aB follows: "A tube or pipe 1b thrust under the 
skin of the meat, and the butcher or dresser 
then blows the foul air from his own lungs into 
the cellular tissue of the meat, the effect being 
that a deceptive appearance of plumpness or 
fatness is given to the meat, and in many cases 
it becomes tainted with the smell of rum, to- 
bacco, etc." This is pleasant for consumers of 
meat, and where ignorance is bliss, it is per- 
haps folly to be wise; and now that public at- 
tention has been called to the "blowing" prac- 
tice, it might perhaps bs as well for butchers 
to meet the wishes of the fastidious so far as to 
use a pair of bellows for the purpose of giving 
a graceful contour to the carcasses of animals 
they kill. Even for their own sakes they will 
act prudently by discontinuing the use of their 
lungs in the process. 

' Chocolate Caramels. — Take one pound of 
sugar, one-fourth pound of chocolate, one table- 
spoonful of milk, one also of molasses. Grate 
the chocolate and mix with sugar, etc. Put the 
mixture in an iron skillet on the back part of 
the stove, where the heat will slowly melt it. 
Cook slowly, stirring it well. To ascertain 
when done, take a little in a spoon and drop it 
in a cup of water; if done, it ought to sink in a 
solid mass, and in a few minutes be firm. 
When you have decided that it is cooked 
enough, grease a long cheesecake tin with but- 
ter; pour iu the mass and spread evenly. Be- 
fore too cold, cut in small squares. 

Breakfast Indian Cake. — Take as much 
meal as may be required, scald it partially; then 
take some drippings of lard and warm water — 
melt the fat with it; then take the meal and 
mix it with milk to the proper consistency; add 
a little salt and a beaten egg, or the egg may be 
omitted; bake ou the griddle, and you will have 
an excellent cake. 

Water Cake. — Take four cups of sifted flour, 
two cups of white sugar, half a cup of butter, 
two eggs, and one cup of water. Turn the 
water over the butter, stir the sugar into it, 
add the eggs well beaten. Dissolve a small 
teaspoonful of saleratus in a little boiling 
water; stir it in; mix two spoonsfula of cream 
of tartar with the flour. Nutmeg, lemon or 
mace for the flavoring. 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS 



[January 2, 1875. 



%W 

W*. B. EWER -- Senioe Editoe. 

DEWEY «fc CO.. Fiiblisliers. 

K T. DEWEY, GEO. H. BTEONQ 
W. B. EWEE, JK O. L. BOOSE 

Office, No. 224 Sansome St., S. E. Corner 
of California St., San Francisco. 

Subscription and Advertising- Rates. 

Subbobeptioss payable in advance — For one year $4; 
ilx months, *2.2d; three months, $1.25. Remittances 
by registered letters or P. O. orders at our risk 
Advertising Kates. — 1 week. 1 month. 3 months. 1 year. 

Per line 25 .80 $a.00 $5.00 

One-half inch $1.00 3.00 7.50 24.00 

Oneinch 1.50 4.00 12.00 40.00 

Large advertisements at iavorable rates. Special °* 
reading notices, legal advertisements, notices appeari n S 
in extraordinary type or in particular parts of the paper, 
inserted at Bpecial rates. 

"We Will Prepay All Postage 
On this paper after the 1st of January, 1875, as the law 
demands. This is equivalent to reducing the sub- 
scription price 20 cents per' annum. Besides, it will 
save subscribers the annoyance of paying petty posta- 
ge bills every quarter. 

©an Francisco: 

Saturday Morning. Jan. 2, 1875. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. - 

EDITOBIALS AND GENERAL NEWS-— 
Improved Current Water Wheel; More Kain Wanted; 
Kosita Mining District, Pag-e 1. Prospectus; The 
Idaho Mine; Shell Mound, Oakland, 8. Hydraulic 
Mining in California; Mining Accidents; The Old 
CotnstoclE, 9. Patents and Inventions; Shooting; 
Faial Political Quarrel; Hawaiian Annexation, and 
other Items of News, 12- 

ILLUSTRATIONS. — McCarty's Current Water 
Wheel, 1. Shell Mound, Oakland"; Hydraulic Mining 
in California, 9. 

MECHANICAL PROGRESS.— Cork as a Non- 
conductor of Heat; Freeing Cast Iron from Phos- 
phorus; Metallic Pens; Thick and Thin Saws; Belt- 
ing and Gearing; Air Pressure in Wind Instruments; 
Springs as Motors; Pulling up Forest Trees by Steam; 
Computing the Speed of Gearing and Pulleys, 3- 

SCIENTIFIC PROGRESS.— The Transit and its 
Probable Results; Peat Charcoal as a Deodorizer; The 
Telemeter in Surveying; The Development of Natu- 
ral History and Science, 3. 

MINING STOCK MARKET.— Thursday's Sales 
at the San Francisco Stock Board; Notices of Assess- 
ments; Meetings and Dividends; Review of Stock 
Market for the Week, 4. 

MINING SUMMARY.— From various counties in 
California and Nevada, 4-5. 

GOOD HEALTH. -Washing Out the Stomach; The 
Hourly Death Rate; Simple Dyspepsia Remedies; 
Nelaton's Treatment of Boils; Red Wall Paper Dan- 
gers; Health and Marriage; How to Avoid Cold6, 7. 

USEFUL INFORMATION.— Reduction of Obes- 
ity; Natural Antiscorbutics; Structure of a Cow's 
Horn: Chinese India Ink; Useful Information, 7- 

DOMESTIC ECONOMY.— How to Cook Turkeys 
and Chickens; Blowing Meat; Chocolate Caramels; 
Breakfast Indian Cake; Water Cake, 7. 

MISCELLANEOUS.— The Big Mill; Mining Theo- 
ries; The Iowa Hill Canal; Coso— The New District; 
Removing Hair from Hides, 2. Development of the 
Iron Interest; Bartlett Creek; Comlumbia District; 
New Oregon Mines; Pancake Mountain Coal; City 
Mining; Prospecting Northward; The New Mine; 
Napa County Mines; Of Doubtful Practicability; Bull 
Run and Cornucopia; Fastening Iron in Stone; Mark- 
ing Tools, 6. Novices and Adobe-Soil; Paradise Val- 
ley; Landscape Gardening; Crude Way to Test Sul- 
phuretB; Groom District; Levee Law Amendments in 
Political Code; Relief DiBtrict, 10- 



[Business Notice.] 



Mining and Scientific Press, 

A VALUABLE WEEKLY FOR 

Miners, Mechanics and Manufacturers 
on the Pacific Coast. 

Volume XXX of this first-class, standard 
journal commences with the year 1875. Its 
proprietors, having the successful experience 
of ten years publication of the Pbess, have no 
hesitation in saying that for the ensuing year 
the paper shall, in keeping with the times, 
reach a higher mark of merit than ever before. 

"With our own printing press, folding ma- 
chine, 

Able Editors, Correspondents, 

And skilled workmen in different departments 
of our now extensive and growing establish- 
ment, we mean to print a journal throughout 
the year, which all citizens, whether patrons 
or not, may be proud of seeing published and 
supported on this side of the ccntinent. 

No kindred journal in America furnishes 
more real 

Fresh, Novel, Interesting Information 

In its volumes than the Mining and Scientific 
Peess. "We have the 

Largest Mining Field in the World 

To report from. It embraces the largest variety 
of mines and mining; methods of working; and 
more numerous wonderful discoveries than any 



other section of the globe. It is the birth place 
of many of the 

Latest and Best Inventions in Gold, 
Silver and Labor Saving, 

With brief, reliable, well chosen and prepared 
editorials; varied and condensed correspond- 
ence and selections; tables and statistics ar- 
ranged for ready reference, 

Superior Illustrations, 

Of local and general interest to its readers, it 
forms a weekly journal of individual character 
and unrivalled worth to its intelligent and in- 
dustrial Patrons at home and abroad. It is the 

Leading Mining Journal of America, 

And in its practical, interesting and substantial 
make up, it is unrivalled by any mining or 
mechanical journal in the world. 

Home Manufactures and Home Inven- 
tions 

Will be constantly encouraged. Both help to 
build up the brain and material wealth of the 
country. They are kindred to our individual 
enterprise. Our interests are mutual with all 
home aitizans and producers. Where on the 
face of the globe do inventoks and Manufac- 
turers either need or desebve more tncourage- 
ment ? 

Its Value to the Community, 

In disseminating important information; dissi- 
pating false notions; checking expensive follies; 
instigating important enterprises; by wise coun- 
sel and scientific direction, enrich' Dg the rewards 
of honest labor, we are annually saving and 
adding 

Millions of Dollars 

To the products of our countiy. The Psess 
has already 

A Large Circulation, 

And is deserving of more universal patronage 
from those whose interests it specially repre^ 
sents. This sparsely populated portion of the 
Union is a difficult one for publishers to pre- 
sent the claim of their journal in to all who 
should subscribe. In these times of seemingly 
cheap (but largely, trashy and worthless) jour- 
nalism, it is desirable and proper that those 
who know the real merits of a faithful journal 
should 

Speak and Act in its Favor. 

We shall not spare our efforts to make sound 
and improved issues, maintaining constantly 
the rights of all, and forwarding the material 
and intellectual rights of our patrons, and of 
our sturdy, progressive community. 

Necessarily, scientific and mining publica- 
tions generally are costly and high priced, but 
considering the size, character and location of 
our publication, our rates are favorable for so 
valuable a print. 

We invite correspondence from all sections. 

Subscriptions, payable in advance, $4 a year. 
Single copies, postpaid, 10 cents. 

Address, DEWEY & CO-, 

Publishees, No. 224 Sansome St., S. F. 

A Qdery. — Would it be practicable to con- 
struct an apparatus which would automatically 
imitate the sounds of a telegraphic instrument? 
Some who read this may be already aware that 
messages can be sent very rapidly by means of 
perforated patterns, punctured to correspond 
to the dots and dashes used in telegraphy. If 
some inventor will be ingenious enough to 
apply this principle, or some ..other, in such, a 
way as to get up a self-acting sounder which will 
repeat any given message that may be arranged 
for it, imitating the sounds made by a good 
operator; such a sounder could be made very 
useful to students in telegraphy. By its use 
students could, at their own homes, soon be- 
come familiar with these sounds. It would 
greatly aid in removing one of the chief diffi- 
culties in the way of becoming a "sound" 
operator. 

A clean-up at the Chile Gulch hydraulic, 
Calaveras county, last week, realized $21,000. 



The Idaho Mine. 

The Idaho mine, Grass Valley, is owned by 
a few people and worked on strict business 
principles as all mines should be. It is not 
known in the stock market, and is not listed in 
the Board. For this reason no quotations of its 
value appear in the newspapers, and very little 
is heard of it except reports of progress in the 
Grass Valley newspapers. The mine is owned 
by a "close corporation," has its offices in 
Grass Valley, and is not known on California 
street. The 35-stamp mill, hoisting works and 
machinery are the best in the district, and the 
mine is in a generally prosperous condition. 
The mine is a sample of many others in this 
Slate, worked by private companies, which 
greatly increase the bullion product, and of 
whieh no record is made of profits. In the 
published statement of dividends, etc., each 
year, no mines are mentioned except those ou 
the stock list, and mines like the Idaho are to- 
tally ignored. Nevertheless, the Idaho has 
paid from 1869 to 1874 the sum of $1,602,750 
in dividends, making a profit of 517 per cent, 
during that time on the capital stock. Since 
1869 there have been 65 dividends paid, as fol- 
lows: In 1869 11 dividends were paid, equal to 
$170,500, or 55 per cent, on the capital stock. 
In 1870 the mine paid seven dividends, equal 
to $37,500, or 12 per cent. In 1871 it paid 12 
dividends, equal to $232,500, or 75 per cent. 
In 1872 it paid 11 dividends, equal to $162,750, 
or 52% per cent. In 1873 it paid 12 dividends, 
equal to $682,000, or 220 per cent. In 1874 
it pai4 12 dividends, equal to $317,750, or 
102% per cent. This makes a total of $1,602,- 
700 in dividends, or 517 per cent on the capi- 
tal stock in six years. 

There are few mines which can show abetter 
record than this when- the perceutage of profit 
is considered. There are only 3,100 shares in 
all, and the owners realized a profit this year 
of $102.50 per share. The report of the offi- 
ceis of the mine as published in full in the 
Gra&e Valley Union is quite inteiesting, as 
showing the relative expenses and profits of 
working the mine. During the year they 
crushed 28,801% tons of rock, of which 
1,942% tons came from the 400 level; 1,886^ 
tons came from the 500 level; 5,581% tons 
came irom the 600 level; 16,433% tons came 
from the 700 level; 1,594% tons came from the 
800 level, and 963 from the shaft. This gave a 
gross yield of 36,169 ounces of gold, $631,- 
190 56—217 tons of sulphnrets, $1,600; speci- 
mens, $38.50; gross yield of tailings, $10,- 
989.25; gold from old copper, $692.39. Total, 
$664,811.20. Giving an average of $23.40 per 
ton. 

The superintendent states that during the 
year they have driven 1,149 feet of drift. This 
amount of drift has opened up more ledge than 
they have worked out, and he estimates that 
they have four years work of pay ore in sigut. 
The following is a summary of receipts and 
expenditures: 

EXPENDITUBES. 

Mill and mining $233,662.20 

Sulphnrets account. 4,436.50 

Tailing do 1,238.50 

McDougal concentrator 293.01 

Burleigh drill 11,507.20 

New pumping works 25,001 .41 

Repairing old shaft for pump 9,186.86 

New steam pump for 200 level 1,685.02 

Sinking main shaft .- 23,375.89 

General account 24,270,99 

Total expense of working mine $334,767,58 

Dividends $102.50 per share 317,750.00 

$652,517.58 

RECEIPTS. 

Cash on hand '. ? 10,297.10 

36,167 ounces bullion 631,190.56 

Sulphnrets, worked and sold 19,243.35 

Percentage from tailing 5,557.13 

Pan rent 1,288.50 

Old copper '. ; 992 .89 

Lease of surplus water 400.00 

Specimens sold 38.50 

Old rope 15.00 

Total receipts $699,023.03 

Expenditures 652,517.58 

Cash on hand $ 16,505.45 

On the mill and mining account the princi- 
pal items were $45,605 for surface labor, 
S123.912 for underground labor, $9,312 for 
foundry work, $21,522 for lumber, $4 055 for 
powder and fuse, $5,220 for candles and oils, 
83,116 for quicksilver and $6,000 for Superin- 
tendent's salary. 

They sold 153 tons of sulphuret3, and worked 
64 tons, the latter costing $1,600 to work by 
chlorination process. From the whole they 
got $19,243. The Burleigh drill cost them 
$11,567 of which the machinery cost $7,800, 
freight and commission $1,108, and masonry 
foundation $2,168, The new pumping works 
cost $25,000, of which the foundry work cost 
$16,764. 

.Repairing the old shaft cost $9,186, of which 
£7,217 was spent for labor; sinking the new 
shaft cost $23,375, of which $16,886 was for 
underground labor and $2,652 was for surface 
labor. The State and county tax on the mine 
for the year was $15,200. 

The receipts from all sources, according to 
the report of the Secretary, were from Decem- 
ber, 1873 to December 1874, $658,725, which, 



with a balance on hand December 1st, 1873, 
shows assets for the year of $669,023. The 
total expenses includ ; ng dividends for the year, 
were $652,517, leaving a balance in the.treasury 
December 1st, 1874 of 16,505. In these expen- 
ditures are included 12 dividends amounting in 
all to $317,750 for the year. 

In reviewing the operations of the mine for 
the year, it will be seen that the yield of the 
rock has not been so much nor the dividends 
so large as last year. Still it has been very 
good, and the dividends very handsome. The 
pumping capacity of the mine has been in- 
creased, and in carrying that out tho old shaft 
has been straightened and retimbered, and this 
work is still in progress. The engine is 20 
inch diameter and 42 inch stroke. The surface 
machinery is all set on solid masonry, and all 
its parts are deemed sufficiently strong and ca- 
pable of standing any work that may be re- 
quired of it for many years. The Superinten- 
dent says: The underground work has been 
pushed ahead with due diligence, and having 
in view the importance of keeping the mine well 
opened, work has been constantly going on in 
the drifts and in the main shaft. The shaft is 
down 75 feet below the 800 level. The ledge is 
somewhat broken up, thus rendering it neces- 
sary to carry avery large shaft, as well as to make 
it more expensive. The quartz seems to be im- 
proving, and it is thought it will form a solid 
ledge before reaching the 900 level. The 800 
west level is in 116 feet from the shaft, but 
little rock has been taken from the backs. This 
is an average quality of rock. Also the 800 
east is of average grade ore, and the drift is in 
109 feet from the shaft. The 700 west drift is 
in to within 35 feet of the Eureka mine, and a 
"few months more will exhaust the backs. The 
700 east drift is in 424 feet fiom the shaft, and 
the backs are worked through to the 600 level 
233 feet from the shaft. The 600 south drift is 
in 803 feet from the shaft, or 322% feet from 
the split. The ledge is exhausted in the drift, 
and it is low grade ore in the backs. The norih 
branch is in 421 feet from the split, and 901% 
feet from the shaft. The ledge has been very 
small, it is now opening out larger, but it is 
low grade ore; however from indications it 
ought to come in better. The rock in those 
backs is good mill rock, aud it is worked 
through to the 500 level 341 feet from the shaft. 
The 500 backs is of an average quality; they 
are not yft worked through to the 400 at any 
point. The 400 is exhausted. 

At the annual election held on the 21st of De- 
cember, the following Trustees were elected for 
tbe year: Edward Coleman, Jobu C. Coleman, 
M. P. O'Connor, Thomas Findley and John 
Polglase. The Board organized with the fol- 
lowing officers: Edward Coleman, President 
and Superintendent; Geo. W. Hill, Secretary; 
Thomas Findley, Treasurer. 



Shell Mound, Oakland. 

Some two miles to the northwest of Oak- 
land city hall, a few rods from the shore 
of the bay, on the farm of Mr. Wiard, 
stands an aboriginal mound. "Well-grown wil- 
low trees effectually conceal it from view until 
you arrhe quite near it. The accompanying 
sketch was taken when the tops of many of the 
trees on the south side were cut away. These 
have now so luxuriantly grown as to embower 
the tumulus, and shut out the view on the side 
of approach. It is called the " Shell Mound," 
from the fact of its being composed ohiefly of 
marine shells and some gravel. It rises a 
shaTply defined pile from the surface of a 
uniformly level plain of rich, alluvial aoil. 
"Without exact measurement it is estimated to 
be near thirty-five feet high. It is a circular, 
conical pyramid, with a truncated or flat sum- 
mit, which measures 150 feet in diameter, and 
300 feet at the base. Bones, skulls, stone mor- 
tars and charcoal, have been found in and 
about it. 

That it owes its existence to the barbarous 
energy of human beings is self-evident. Abbo 
Dotnenick, speaking of Indian mounds on the 
Pacific coast, says they are often made from 
the adjacent soil, and hence near them is ob- 
served wells or pits from which the earth has 
been taken to erect them. Such an explanation 
does not apply to the Oakland mound, for 
there are no pit holes in its vioinity, and if 
there had been, which by the agency of the 
elements and time became filled up, that allu- 
vial soil could not furnish the shells of which 
the mound is mainly composed. 

Shell mounds are numerous on the Pacific 
coast, and they abound in profusion in Den- 
mark. Danish archaeologists call them "kjock- 
enmoddiugs," or "kitchenmiddens;" and re- 
gard them as the accumulated lvmains of the 
repasts of by-gone inhabitants. Wo know not 
how the people slept, but thf se crumbs tell us 
what they ate and where. Such mounds have 
grown into existence by accident and without 
object. A like "kitchenmidden*' keeps subor- 
dinate company with the subject of our sketch, 
only a few rods east of it. This is a beautiful, 
round topped knoll, some 12 feet high and 400 
feet basic diameter. On this most reliable 
ppo f of always moist, mellow mould, Mr. W.'s 
dwelling-house stands surrounded with choice 
shrubbery. 



They are digging away and otherwise pre- 
paring to put in place at the Consolidated "Vir- 
ginia hoisting works a new engine for forcing 
air down to the mine. 



January 2, 1875.] 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



Hydraulic Mining in California, 
iv. >. a. 

The Chimney. 
The advisability of extending the tnnnel well 
into the ba-iin before "tapping" the latter cau- 
not be disputed. If a shaft or incline baa been 
sunk to the depth of the channel or basin, the 
terminus of the tunnel can be decided upon ac- 
cording to the knowledge gained. Whenever 
this point is reached, it will be necessary to 
pierce tho bed-rock intervening between the 
terminus and the gravel deposit in the channel. 
by a "chimney"— either a vertical shaft or a 
slope. This chimney mast be started in such 
a direction as to strike the bottom of the shaft 
or incline. Should water have collected in the 
latter it must bo removed by pumping before a 
connection is made. Want of care in this mat- 
ter has caused much lamentable loss of life. 
Chimney Without Shaft. 

Should, however, no shaft or incline exist, 
and should the condition of the gravel bed 
overhead be unknown, the greatest care must 
be taken in making the attempt to break 
through. 

As before remarked, great bodies of sand lie 
in the sloping rim-rock, before the solid bot- 
tom gravel is reached. This sand is in connec- 
tion with loose gravel deposits overhead, and 
becomes quick under the great pressure of 
water which always exists in deep gravel de- 
posits. (See Fig. G.) Whenever these saud 
patch's nre entered without the greatest pre- 
caution, immense rushes of water, stind, and 
loose pravel will occnr, filling often the largest 
tunnels in a few minutes. There are oases on 
record where the labor of two or three years 
was lost, the greatest portion of the tnnnel he- 
ing necessarily abandoned, and n new direction, 
to the right or left, pursued. When, therefore, 
the attempt is made to rnn up a ehimnev from 
the terminus of the tunnel into the unexplored 
channel above, the work should be commenced 
to the right or left of the terminus, and be con- 
tinued on a convenient slope. The expe- 
rienced miner will know, whenever the water 
increases in the seams ot the rock, or when the 
BeamB turn yellow, or the rock changes to a 
softer stratum, that the basin or channel may 
be only a short distance above. When these 
signs occur, it is advisable to drill a hole far 
enough to test the thickness of the rock inter- 
vening between the chimney and tbe channel. 
Should the drill pierce the rock, it is easy to 
insert a thinner and longer iron rod to feel the 
deposit above the bed-rock. If hard gravel is 
struck all will be safe, and the chimney can be 
continued without any apprehension; but if 
water and sand are fuuud, and the iron rod en- 
ters readily for 5 or 6 feet, it will be better to 
abandon the chimney at once, and continue 
the tunnel. The presence of sand and water, 
or qnicksand, indicates that the deplh of the 
channel is not reached, and that the most valu- 
able gravel deposits lie deeper, and at the same 
time forewarns the miner of a great danger, a 
rush of quicksand and loose gravel. 

The diagram given herewith, representing a 
section of sloping rim-rock, and the different 
deposits as they occurred in fact, will explain 
itself. 

The chimney, if hard gravel is reached, 
should be continued, as before stated, on a 
slope, as in this way tbe work can be more 
safely done than in a vertical shaft. This con- 
sideration may be of little importance, so long 
as the ground is hard and strong, but in softer 
strata, surcharged with water, a slope offers 
the only chance to proceed with safety to a cer- 
tain point. When this point is reached, and a 
further progress barred, it is beet to secure the 
terminus of the ehimnev in such a way that the 
water can drain off, without giving the sand, or 
loose gravel, a chance to ran. After this care- 
ful survey must be made to ascertain the exact 
spot where a shaft from the surface down will 
strike the terminus of the chimney. This is an 
easy matter when the tunnel is straight. 
Shaft. 

A shaft with square section, (say 4 by 4 feet,) 
to permit timbering, must be commenced and 
worked down in the usual way, as'far as circum- 
stances will permit. If the drainage establish- 
ed through the ehimnev is sufficient to free the 
shaft from water, it will be comparatively easy 
to go through sand and gravel and connect 
shafc and chimney; but if' this drainage cannot 
be established, or is not adequate, even with 
additional hoisting of the water by windlass 
and buckets, it is best to procure an artesian 
borer, and to make thus a connection between 
the bottom of the shaft and tbe chimney. (The 
character of the ground excluding the existence 
of large pebbles or bowlders, an artesian borer 
can be used to good advantage.) After this the 
shaft can be brought down, but must be secured 
firmly against side pressure by good framing 
and planking. 

First Washing. 

The connection once made between shaft and 
chimney, sluice boxes may be laid through the 
tunnel, and the first washing of "dirt" may 
commence, This begins by removing the up- 
per sections of timber out of the shaft, widen- 
ing its mouth by pick, shovel, and water, and 
tumbling and running the "dirt" and water 
into it, always, however, taking care not to 
choke the shaft or chimney. This process is 



continued downward, in the shape of steps, or 
terraces, as security against cavings or slides. 
It must depend on the depth of the ^haft, as 
well us on the greater or less safety of the 
ground, whether a larger or smaller oponing of 
the shaft is to bo made, since dangerous 
ravings may occur in spite of all precautions. 
In this way an opening must be made to per- 
mit the use of water under pressure. It must 
be left to the manager of the mine to shape the 
chimney in such a wuy that au easy and unit) 
terrupted discharge in tho sluice box«.s is se- 
en red. 

If the main tunnel is to be continued farther 
it will be nec< Bsary to 1< are et ough space be- 
tween the starting point of the chimney and 
the face of the tunnel to admit blasting opera- 
tions. At the same time precaution ought to] 



To avoid these dangers working -in benches 
IB resorted to, (see page 7), and the washing 
away of the upper strata thus serves thret- 
beneficial objects: firBt, in producing the pepn< 
uiary means in bnpport of other works to be 
carried on; second, iu lessening the depth of 
the shaft to connect with bed-rock tunnel; and 
third, in leaviug a "bench" which, under all 
circumstances, will be necesbary in a deep 
gravel mine. 

Com lc lined froiuftn article* by Clmrlfo Wukl-yr, 

In the last Annual Kpport of tho U. 8. Commissioner 
of Mining HtatlBticu. 



A New Volume. 

With this number commences Volnrue XXX 
of the Mining and Scientific Press. Tho pa- 




mmzfc 

SHELL MOUND, OAKLAND. 



be taken to protect the blasters in the tnnnel 
from any accident arising from the possible 
blockade of the sluice boxes or tunnel, and the 
only safe expedient will be to have not only a 
strong barrier between the blasters and sluice 
boxes, but also to have an independent way for 
ingress and egress. This may be secured by 



Per has bee:n published for so long a time that 
it is well known, and its success is firmly es- 
tablished. We have endeavored to furnish a 
superior publication to our subscribers during 
tbe past year, and it will be our endeavor to im- 
prove each number daring the coming year. I 



Fig. VI. 




A, quicksand; B, red gravel, (firm); C, loose gravel; D, moraine; E, blue gravel; E, bed-rock 

good time for old subscribers to renew 



widening the chimney sufficiently to admit a 
strong water-proof box with a ladder, by which 
means the miner can reach the surface of the 
ground, without interference from either the 
washings or divings of the gravel from above, 
or any blockade in the tunuel below. 
It will be seen that the existence of a shaft 



their subscriptions, and to induce their neigh- 
bors to enroll their names also on our large 
and increasing list. With compliments to outj 
newspaper exchanges of the past, we woul 
say that all editors receiving this number of 



Fig. VII. 




Gravel-bank, with three drifts; A B, bed-rock tunnel. 



orincline, before tbe connection between the ter- 
minus of the tunnel and the basin or channel, 
is of great importance. If an incline exists, 
great facilities are offered to employ hydro- 
static power from the lower part of the incline, 
as soon as a moderate opening is made to the 
surface. 

Upper Workings. 

Many mines are situated so favorably that 
the upper strata can be worked without any ex- 
pensive bed-rock tunnel. In such cases it will 
be advisable, if circumstances permit, to com- 
mence the working of the upper strata at once, 
particularly if the gravel deposit has a thick- 
ness of two or three hundred feet. In this wise 
a very useful and necessary work can be ac- 
complished pending the construction of the 
deeper bed-rock tunnel; and perhaps a part, if 
not all, of the cost of the latter may be earned. 

When the gravel bank rises to a greater 
higbt than 125 or 150 feet, the work iu a hy- 
draulic mine becomes very dangerous, as the 
momentum of any mass of matter falling from 
the high bank will carry it far into the mine, 
endangering life and property. 



the Peess may consider that we desire a con" 
tinuance of their exchange. 



The New Comer— 1875. 

How awkward the bookkeeper, the corre- 
spondent, and others who nourish the pen, feel 
iu making the simple change of figures from 
'74 to '75! But it must be done; for Time is 
"relentless" in small things as well as in more 
weighty matters. We accordingly make the 
Imperative change, hoping that the "new 
broom" — 1875 — will really sweep a clean 
course for the Peess, and that our in- 
tercourse with our subscribers and friends will 
will be as pleasant when we remove it from the 
heading of our paper, as it is at the present 
time when we first place it there. We again 
wish our friends a "Happy New Year." 



In Trinity county everything is dried up, and 
farmers and miners are waiting for rain. 



The Old Comstock. 

The fortunate owners of some of the mines 
on this famous lode, who familiarly apply the 
" pot name" which heads these remarks, to 
the most wonderful lode in the world, have of 
lato become more attaohed to it than ever. 
Tho "Old Comstock," so much belied, so badly 
mis-represented; the subject of thousands of 
articles and hundreds of sermons intended to 
induce people to abandon miniug; the Old 
Comstock, which has held its grip through all, 
is coming out grander than ever. Although 
the figures— which are never supposed to lie 
except in mining matters, when they are always 
supposed to misrepresent — show that the 
profits of the Comstock mines since the lode 
was discovered have been enormous. Every 
time the stock market fell we were told that the 
mines there were worthless; still theowners of the 
mines went on working and sinking regardless 
of all rumors or reports. They had faith in 
the Old Comstock, and their faith has been 
well rep-iid. They sunk shafts and winzes, 
run levels and drifts, made inclinos and tunnels, 
built hoisting and pumping works, put up 
mills and buildings, and continued to prospect 
aud open up their mines in the face of all sorts 
of difficulties. The results have been most 
magnificent; their labor has been rewarded a 
thousand-fold. 

The mines which have "straok it" have 
made fortunes for their owners and encouraged 
other mines to further development, Tbe 
smallest and most insignificant mine on the 
lode may strike rich ore any day, and become 
famous. Some of the mines have worked out 
their ore bodies and are working on for others. 
Some, agtin, have been unprofitable and have 
been kept running by assessments. But still, 
when we compare the assessments with the 
dividends, as a whole, the dividends have a 
magnificent balance in their favor. 

Aside from all questions of individual profit, 
there is one, question which is seldom thought 
of, but which is of very great importance. If 
the mines simply paid expenses itwould yet be 
beneficial to the country to have them worked. 
Thousands of persons are employed about 
them in one way and another, and immense 
amounts of money are distributed in the very 
channels where it is most needed, that is 
among the laboring ' classes. Why people 
should grumble because Mr. Jones, or Sharon 
or Hayward, or Kalston, or Flood & O'Brien, 
or a dozen others have accumulated large for- 
tunes from these mines, we do not see. If these 
gentlemen have invested their money and re- 
ceived large profits, they are perfectly entitled 
to it. They are envied and abused by Bcores 
of people who wouldn't have the pluck to in- 
vest where there was not a sure thing, bui who 
would like very much to come in for the profits 
without risk of loss. 

They are not by any means the only ones 
who are prosperous on account of the profits 
of the mines. The farmers, millmen, team- 
sters, railroad men, foundrymen and mechan- 
ics of all kinds who are kept busy by the work 
on the Comstock, may be numbered by the 
thousands; of the fifteen or twenty foundries 
in this city which are now so busy, one-quarter 
would suffice if it were not for mining work. 
Artizans of all kinds are furnished with em- 
ployment at good wages on* account of these 
mines. A number of handsome and expensive 
buildings are going up in this city at present, 
which are being built with money made from 
the Comstock. These employ hundreds of 
men of different trades at fair wages and steady 
work. In fact the benefits are wide spread 
and general, causing prosperity in all branches 
of business and a hopeful feeling of its con- 
tinuance . 

Still, after all it has done and is doing, the 
Old Comstock promises us even more to come. 
It promises to increase its production and i's 
dividends; to employ moie men and to want 
more and heavier machinery; to turn the at- 
tention of the whole world toward the Pacific 
coast; to help build up the Queen of the Pa- 
cific more than it has ever done; to furnish 
capitalists with as much money as they want 
to invest in other directions; to give other coun- 
tries a vast amount of experience in deep 
mining; to show other countries milling and 
mining machinery of dimensions and perfec- 
tion never dreamed of; to call forth the inven- 
tive faculties of genius to aid in overcoming 
the difficulties attending mining on such a 
large scale and at such depths; to Bolve prob- 
lems of ventilation by practice; to increase the 
resources of the coast; and to assist in bring- 
ing times of general prosperity to Nevada, 
California and the whole United States. 



It Pays rx Mobe Ways than One. — It pays 
in more ways than one to take a good newspa- 
per. If you read it, it is a benefit which lasts 
beyond death. If your family read it, they 
will be better companions for you and the 
world besides. It is a good representative of 
your community when sent abroad, and you 
can afford to support it for the value of its in- 
fluence in the public weal. 



10 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS 



[January 2, 1875. 



Novices and Adobe Soil. . 

Eastern people before coming to California 
manifest a goo'd deal of curiosity concerning 
our adobe soil; and one of the prominent points 
of their initiation into farm life here is becom- 
ing acquainted with this stubborn reality. "We 
have on several occasions had enquiries from 
such parlies for information on this subject. 
One of these, who confesses himself a novice 
in this respect, asks some general questions, 
which in answering we hope to benefit a class 
of careful, energetic, persistent men, who are 
well calculated to subdue this stubborn portion 
of our soil, and make the spots where it abounds 
places of enduring wealth. 

The character of adobe soil varies materially 
in different localities; it is not safe, therefore, 
to accept any general system for treating this 
kind of soil. Particular care is needed in tak- 
ing the soil when in proper condition to work. 
To work it when perfectly dry is simply impos- 
sible; and if it is plowed when too wet, and 
sticky, it becomes lumpy, hard, and altogether 
nnmanagable. Our correspondent is probably 
acquainted with the characteristics of the heavy 
clay soil that forms much— and some of the 
best — of the farm land of the Atlantic States. 
He will find the adobe soil of California of the 
same character "only more so." Both require 
the same "catching" habit in working; deriv- 
ing equal benefit from thorough cultivation, 
and being alike in their lasting qualities. In 
the East this kind of soil is brought up to a 
high state of cultivation by underground drain- 
ing, subsoiling and fall plowing, leaving it ex- 
posed to the action of the frost during winter. 
This soil possesses in itself remarkable endur- 
ance in fertility, and will give a better return 
than any other for manures applied. It is not 
expected that the cultivators of adobe soil in 
California will, as yet, resort to underground 
draining and subsoiling; and they will not have 
the aid of severe frosts and repeated thawings; 
still, if they use the means within their reach 
they can subdue this soil, and bring it up to a 
perfect state of cultivation. 

Our Mend asks, "what grain and what fruit 
will grow on it?" "We answer that when prop- 
erly treated it will grow any kind of grain or 
fruit, but unless the condition of the soil is 
favorable when worked, the labor bestowed 
upon it will be extremely hard and unremuner- 
ative. Probably in the locality from which 
our correspondent writes— San Luis Obispo — 
the present condition of the soil would favor 
plowing. If he could put in a crop of wheat 
while the ground is in suitable condition, then 
earlj in autumn plow in the stubble, this would 
lighten up the soil beside furnishing a good 
supply of manure. If the wheat could be put 
in and get a good start, so as to cover the 
ground before the drying northers appear, a 
good crop might, reasonably be expected; but 
if after seeding and before the starting of the 
grain, the heavy rains ensue, followed by dry 
north winds, then the prospect is discouraging. 
In regard to fruit, as in other products which we 
have mentioned, in connection with adobe soil, 
we, of course, cannot consider the various pur- 
roundings; these must be taken into account 
by the residents of the localities; but speaking 
of the character of the soil, merely, we say 
that it is especially adapted to apples and 
pears; and that under favorable circumstances, 
the small fruits, even strawberries, would do 
well on it. 

In answer to the enquiry of our Correspond- 
ent in regard to a work giving directions for 
planting and working nurseries, we would in- 
form him that this coast is, as far as we can 
ascertain, destitute of reliable authority on 
this subject. Works that meet the wants of 
Eastern nurserymen in every respect, are not 
adapted to California. Our most successful 
nurserymen are those who have from the start- 
ing point adapted themselves to the peculiar 
wants of the country and have obtained thiir 
knowledge by experience. They have had 
much to learn, but they have learned it 
thoroughly, consequently judicious' selections 
have been made in all departments; and the 
treatment of what they grow is, from the first, 
auch as the soil and chtna'e of the country re- 
quire. No portion of the United States is bet- 
ter supplied at this important point, or has a 
better horticultural basis to build upon. 

Paeadise Valley. — The Silver Slate says: 
There is not a mountain range in Humboldt 
couniy that has been at all prospected in which 
mineral bearing quartz has not been found. 
The mountains at the head of Paradise valley 
were supposed to be an exception to the rule, 
but recent developments in that locality prove 
th» contrary. Last week Dau Mufiiey wnnt in 
the range about four miles easterly from Camp 
Scott to cut cottonwood poles for John Byrnes. 
"While at work on tbe hillside he noticed large 
quartz bowlders in every direction, which It d 
him to believe that there was a quartz ledge in 
the vicinity. "With ax in hand he proceeded 
a short distance up the hill where he discovered 
a large ledge cropping out above the ground, 
and breaking off a piece with his ax was aston- 
ished to find that it was ore. Taking a? much 
as he could conveniently carry he repaired to 
Byrnes', and informed him of what he had 
found. The result was a location of the ledge, 
and an assay of an average of the cropping^, 
which Wiis nude yesterday by J. A. Algauer, 
assayer of the Humboldt reduction works. 
The certiifieates show that it contains $55 45 
per ton in silver, and Byrnes, who i-s a. member 
of the Grand Jury is in a hurry to get home 
and ascertain more about the discovery. 



Landscape Gardening. 

Landscape gardening is an art which is but 
little understood in the Pacific States, generally 
speaking. "We shall therefore try to make it 
not only interesting to the general reader, but 
profitable to those who may have such work 
in contemplation. Landscape paintings are 
always admired by people with any pretentions 
to refinement, and to paint a good and faithful 
likeness of a landscape the artist must possess 
the special gift of imitative ability. But to 
make a park or garden or lay out the 'ground 
■of a private residence, no matter what the 
dimensions are, the landscape gardener must 
have good creative ability, being able to create 
something which will harmonize with the 
place and its surrounding. 

Men or women who are fond of natural 
.scenery often become bewildered from the ex- 
travagant beauties which the landscape may 
afford, and not unfrequently will they select one 
particular point which to their mind 
surpasses all others. To possess such a piece of 
landscaping in some special part of their 
grounds, would be a satisfaction indeed; but, 
great as would be the delight if this was accom- 
plished, it often follows, through the criticism 
of others, more eminent in the profession, that 
sorrow takes the place of delight, and it often 
occurs in this way : 

A sketch is perhaps made of that which we 
wish to possess, and although not marked by 
any special gift of imitative genius, yet it may 
be able to call to mind all the special features 
of interest that are of account, or necessary 
to be remembered. After all the necessary 
preparations are completed, work is com- 
menced; trees, shrubs, and plants are bought, 
rocks, soil and water are, perbaps, introduced, 
all to represent, as nearly as' possible, the orig- 
inal picture. "Work goes on and the required 
end may be attained to the entire satisfaction 
of the parties concerned; satisfied beyond a 
doubt, that they have accomplished much which 
is not only new and expensive, but forms one 
of the most unique pleasure grounds in the 
country; but alas for poor human nature, it de- 
pended too much on itsown ability, not having 
had any previous knowledge of landscaping, I 
find that I have made a very great mistake. 
The introduction of such a piece of work on 
these grounds was entirely out of place. Finding 
now that it will be impossible to make such a 
work harmonize more improvements suggest 
Keep your trees in moist sand until the ground 
is ready to receive them. Tbe sooner a tree is 
"set out" after it has been taken from the nur- 
sery, the better. In ordering trees, instruct 
the nurseryman to trim ready for planting, and 
you will save freight as well as the vitality of 
the tree. These rules are good for all trees; 
but especially for thejalmond and peach. 

Crude Way to Test Sulphurets. 

Since it has been found that sulphurets will 
pay to save in milling process, and that the 
county abounds in this material, we give below 
a hint to prospectors in testing rock, which 
never fails. Several veins which have hereto- 
fore been considered of little value, on account 
of the large amount of sulphurets contained 
therein, and the ignorance of the holders of 
tbe way to .test them, have been found to be 
immensely rich in gold. A new era is opened 
in mines here, and it will yet be found that 
these sulphuret veins are the ones for durability 
and wealth. This crude mode will not hold 
good in all cases, fin all kinds of sulphuret 
rock,) but will bring out more or less of the 
precious metal, if there is any in it: Put a 
piece of rock into the fire, say about the size of 
your fist, and heat it to a cherry-red, through- 
out, but do not get it to a white heat, as it will 
fuse and run; take it out of the fire and give it 
a gentle shower bath, so as to cool it off slowly, 
as too sudden a cooling will slack up the rock. 
"When cool, examine the rock, and if it is rich 
it will generally show the gold. But for a surer 
test, pulverize it and "horn it out" in the 
usual way. This, perhaps, is not so sure a 
way as a test with acids, but acids are not 
always at hand in the woods with tbe prospect- 
or. After burning, as above, if it does not 
show gold, it will not be apt to do so with acids, 
as it scarcely, if ever fails to bring the color; 
that is, where the sulphuiet is composed mostly 
of iron and sulphur, or arsenic, this test is 
good and will not fail. But where the sulphu- 
ret is copper (and iron) the test is not so good, 
because the copper fuses and carries everything 
that comes in contact with it, so if there is any 
gold with it, it will be covered or fused with 
copper. — Tuolumne Independent. 

Groom Disteict. — We understand that J.,B. 
Osborn, who is largely interested in the mines 
of Groom district, will shortly commence the 
erection of reduction works at that place. 
Groom has been considered for years past one 
of the most promising undeveloped districts in 
southeastern Nevada. It is situated about 200 
miles south of Eureka, in Lincoln county. 
The ores are mainly of the character treated 
by the smelting process. The starting of oper- 
ations in Groom district is one of the fruits of 
the narrow-gauge railroad to Eureka. The ores 
of that section could not be made available at a 
profit so long as it was necessary to freight the 
bullion a distance of nearly 300 miles to the 
Central pacific. The same is in a great meas- 
ure true of Tybo district. Stages will do for 
localities which produce pure silver, but a rail- 
road is requisite to carry off the bullion of im- 
portant base metal camps.— Eureka Sentinel 



Levee Law Amendments in Political 
Code. 



As the following amendments, lately made to 
the new code, are not generally known, we 
give them as important ii 
the readers of the Pbess: 



) many of 



nroivrDUAi,s liable to distbiots for all damages sus- 
tained BY BEiBON OP IKJUBIHG OB CUTTING OF LEVEES. 
[Amendment to Political Code.] 

Seo. 3490.— Any person who shall cut, injure or dstroy 
any levees or other worts of reclamation in any dis- 
trict, iB responsible for all damages which may be oc- 
casioned thereby to such levee works; and an action 
therefor must be brought in the District Court of the 
county, or either of the countieB in which such levee 
worts are Bituated, in the names of the trustees of the 
district. If there be no tru&teee then the action may 
be brought in the name of any landowner in the dis- 
trict. The amount recovered in such action must be 
paid to the treasurer of the county who must place the 
same to the credit of the district. 

OCCUPANTS OFLANDS ON BANKS OP STBEAMS LIABLE FOB 

damages. [Political Code.] 

Sec. 3,486. — Any person owning or occupying lands 
upon the banks of any stream where the lands lying 
back of such stream are lower than the bank thereof, 
is responsible for all damages which may be sustained 
by the owners or occupants of lower lands by reason of 
any cut or embrasure rniide on the bank of Buch stream 
by the owner or occupant of the bank, 

COUNTY AND INDIVIDUAL BE8PON8IBLE FOR INJUBY TO OB 

destruction of levees by MOBS ok riots. [See Po- 
litical Code and Amendment '73 and '74. ] 
Sec. 4,000. — Every county is a body politic and cor- 
porate, and as such haB the powers specified in this 
code, or in special statutes, and such powers are neces- 
sarily implied from those expressed. 

Sec. 4,452. — Every municipal corporation is respon- 
sible for injuries to real or personal property situate 
within its corporate limits done or caused by mobs or 
riots. 

Sec. 3,453. — Actions for damages under the preceding 
section must he tried in the county in which the prop- 
erty injured is situated. 

Sec. 4,454. — All actions herein provided for must be 
commenced within one year after the act complained of 
is committed. 

BOARD OF SUPERVISOnS AUTHORIZED TO PAY FOR DAMAGE 
CAUSED BY MOBS OB RIOTS. 

Seo. 4,455. - On the certificate of the presiding officer 
or of the clerk of the court in which the judgment is 
rendered, the board of supervisors of the county or the 
legislative authority of the city must by ordinance di- 
rect and cause to be issued a warrant for the payment 
thereof on the general fund, and the same must be paid 
in its regular order, as other warrants of the municipal 
corporation are paid; and must, at the proper timea.Ievy 
and cause to be collected a tax on the taxable property of 
such municipal corporation for the payment of such 
warrant within a period of not more than three years. 

Seo. 4,456 — The plaintiff in any action authorized by 
this title must not recover if it appears upon the trial 
that the damage complained of was occasioned or in 
any manner aided, sanctioned, or permitted by his 
carelessness or negligence. 

[Title rv, Chapter i., sections 4,452, 4,453, 4,454, 4,555, 
are made applicable to levees, by amendments to Political 
Code.] 

Sec. 4,457 — The provisions of this title and chapter 
(Title iv. Chapter i.) are applicable to cases where 
losses and other works of reclamation of any District 
are injured or destroyed by mob or riot; and the action 
brougnt for damages therefor must be prosecuted by 
the Attorney- General of the State in the name of the 
people of the State of California; and the amountrecov- 
ered in such action must be paid to the Treasurer of 
the county, who must place the same to the credit of 
the District. All provisions of law inconsistent with 
the provisions of this section are repealed. 

TO INJURE OR DESTROY LEVEES OR OTHER WORKS OF RE- 
CLAMATION, A FELONY, UNDER " AN ACT FOR THE PRO- 
TECTION OF CERTAIN LANDS FROM OVERFLOW," APPRO- 
VED MARCH 25TH, 1868. 

Sec. 18. — Any person or persons who shall wilfully or 
maliciously, cut, injure or destroy, any levee or other 
work of protection built under the provision of this 
Act, or that may be in charge of said Board of Super- 
visors, shall be deemed guilty of felony, and upon con- 
viction thereof before any court of competent jurisdic- 
diction shall be fined in any 6um not leBs than fifty 
dollars nor more than one thousand, or be confined in 
the State prison not leBS than one nor moro than five 
years, or may be both fined and imprisoned, at the dis- 
cretion of the court. 

ACCES50RrJES HELD AS PRINCIPLES. 

Sec. 971 [Penal Code Amendment '73, '74]— The dis- 
tinction between an accessory before the fact and a 
principal, and between principals in the first and 
second degree, in caseB of felony is abrogated, and all 
persons concerned in the commission of a felony, 
whether they directly commit the act constituting the 
offense, or aid and abet in its commission, though not 
present, Bhall hereafter be indicted, tried and punished 
as principals, and no additional facts need be alleged 
in any indictment against such an accessory than are 
required in an indictment against his principal, 

Seo. 972 — An accessory to the commission of a felony 
may be indicted, tried and punished, though the princi- 
pal may be neither indicted nor tried, and though the 
principal may be acquitted. 

CONSPIRACY AND RIOTS, ETC., DEFINED. 

Sec. 182 [Penal Code]— If two or more persons con- 
spire — 

1st. To commit any crime; or 

2d. Falsely to move or maintain any suit, action, or 
proceeding, etc. They are punishable by imprisonment 
in the county jail not exceeding one year, or by fine not 
exceeding $1,000. 

Seo. 405 — Any person who participates in any riot, is 
is punishable by imprisonment in the county jail, 
etc. 

Sec. 407 — "Whenever two or more persons assemble 
together to do an unlawful act, and separate without 
doing or advancing toward it — such assembly is an un- 
lawful assembly. 

Sec. 408— Every person participating is guilty of a 
misdemeanor. . 

Sec. 409- Every person remaining present at the 
place of any riot, mob, or unluwful assembly, after 
warning, is guilty of a misdemeanor. 



Belief Distkict. — It affords lis pleasure to 
announce that work is to be resumed immedi- 
ately on the Centra] Pacific mine, in Belief 
district. The Central produced considerable 
bullion at one time, and was almost on a pay- 
ing basis when, owing to complications arising 
out of informalities in the articles of incorpo- 
ration, work was suspended. M. H. Baily, 
one of the principal owners, has let a contract 
to Stein, Tirrel & Co., to run a tunnel, now in 
150 feet, 100 feet further on to the ledge. There 
is a mill attached to the mine, which of course 
will be started as soon as ore can be procured 
to run it. The ledge has been developed to a 
depth of 150 feet by a shaft, and at one time it 
produced ore that worked from $800 to $1,200 
per ton in silver, — Silver State. 



Scientific and Practical Books 
on Mining, Metallurgy, Etc. 

Published or issued, wholesale and Retail, by DEWEY 
CO., Mining and Scientific Press Office, S. F . 

BY GUIDO KUSTEL, 

Mining Engineeu and Metallurgist. 

Roasting of Gold and Silver Ores, and the 

Extraction of their Respective Metals without Quick 

silver. 1870. 

This rare book on the treatment of gold and silver 
ores without quicksilver, is liberally illustrated and 
crammed full of facts. It giveB short and. concise de- 
scriptions of various processes and apparatus employed 
in this country and In Europe, and explains the why 
and wherefore. 

It contains 142 pages, embracing illustrations of fur- 
naces, implements and working apparatus. ■ 

It is a work of great merit, by an author whose repu 
tation is unsurpassed in his speciality. 

Price $2.60 coin, or $3 currency, postage free 



Concentration of Ores (of all kinds), in- 
cluding the Chlorination Process for Gold-bearing 
Sulphurets, Arseniurets, and Gold and Silver Ores 
generally, with 120 Lithographic Diagrams. 1867. 
This work is unequaled by any other published, em- 
bracing the subjects treated. Its authority is highly 
esteemed and regarded by its readers; containing, as" it 
does, much essential information to the Miner, Mill 
man, Metallurgist, and other professional workers in 
ores and minerals, which cannot be found elsewhere 
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diagrams, illustrating machinery, etc., which alone art* 
of the greatest value. PRICE REDUCED TO $6.' 



Nevada and California Processes of Silver 

and Gold Extraction, for general use, and especially 
or the Mining Public of California and Nevada,, with 
full explanations and directions for all metallurgical 
operations connected with silver and gold from a 
preliminary examination'of the ore to the final cast- 
ing of the ingot. Also, a description of the general 
metallurgy of silver ores. 1864. 
As its title indicates, this work gives a wide range of 
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in precious metals, affording hints and assistance of 
exceeding value to both the moderately informed and 
the most expert operator. 
Price, $5 in cloth; $6 in leather — coin. 



BY OTHER AUTHORS. 
The Quartz Operator's Hand-Book; by P. 

M.Randall. 1871. Revised and Enlarged Edition. 
Cloth bound, 175 pages. Price, $2. 

Sulphurets: What They Are, How Con- 
centrated, How Assayed, and How worked; with a 

Chapter on the Blow-Pipe Assay of Minerals. By 
Wm. M. Barstow.M.D.; 1H67; cloth bound, 114 pages. 
Printed and sold by Dewey & Co. Price, $1; postage 
free. The best written work, and most complete 
work on the subject treated. 
ANY OTHER BOOKS DESIRED will be furnished at 

the most reasonable rates by Dewey & Co., Mining and 

Scientific Press Ofiice, S-. P. 




Ayer's Hair Vigor 

—FOR— 

RESTORING OR.A.Y HAIR 

TO ITS NATURAL VITALITY AND COLOR. 

Advancing years, sick- 
ness, care, disappoint- 
ment, and hereditary 
predisposition, all turn 
the hair gray, and either 
of them incline it to shed 
prematurely. 

Ayee's Haib Vigob, by 
long and extensive use, 
has proven that it Btops 
the falling of the hair 
immediately, often re- 
news the growth, and always surely restores its color, 
when faded or gray. It stimulates the nutritive organs 
to healthy activity, and preserves both the hair and its 
beauty. Thus brashy, weak or sickly hair becomes 
glossy, pliable and strengthened; lost hairregrows with 
lively expression ; falling hair is checked and Btablished ; 
thin hair thickenB; and faded or gray hair resume their 
original color. Its operation is sure and harmless. It 
cures dandruff, heals all humors, and -keeps the scalp 
cool, clean and soft— under which conditions, diseases 
of the scalp are impossible. 

As a dressing for ladies' hair, the Vigob is praised for 

its grateful and agreeable perfume, and valued for the 

soft luster and richness of tone it imparts. 

pbepabed by 

DR. J. C. ATTER & CO., Lowell, Mass., 

PRACTICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTS. 

■^ Sold by all Druggists and Dealers in Medicine. 

CRANE & BEIGHAffi, Wholesale Agents, 

jy!8-8a SAN FBANOTSCO, 



San Francisco Cordage Company. 

Established 1856. 

We have just added a large amount of Dew machinery o 
the latest and most improved kind, and are again prepared 
to fill orders for Rope of any special lengths and sizes. Con- 
stantly on hand a large stock of Manila Rope, all sizea : 
Tarred Manila Rope ; Hay Rope ; "Whale Line, etc., etc. 

TTJBBS & CO., 

de20 611 and 613 Front street, San Francisco . 

Buy Real Estate wnile at Low Rates. 

NINE WATER-FRONT LOTS, CHEAP, 
On Gift Map 4, 

Forming about half of a block fronting on the broad 
ship channel of Islais Creek; will be sold so low as to 
make it an inducement to the buyer. In quire for the 
owner at this office. bptf 



Don't Stop the Pbess. — A subscriber in Tulare 
county, in sending us the renewal of his subscription, 
adds the following: "Don't stop the Pbebs; I'd just as 
soon you would stop a portion of my bread. It is a 
welcome friend to our fireside. Wife is just as deeply 
interested as I am, and would sooner sacrifice her tea 
than forego the pleasure of reading the Pbess. The 
young Grangers in our family, with sparkling eyes and 
swift coming feet, gather around to look at the- ever 
new and unfolding wonders to be found in the Pbkss. 
I repeat it, dontstop the Pbess," D. W. 

Visalia, Nov. 3d, 1S74. 



January 2, 1875. J 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



11 



feaplriflg apd insurance. 



The Pacific Mutual Life Insurance 
Company of California. 



No. 41 Second street, 



Sacramento 



ACCUMULATED FUND. NEARLY 

&1, £250,000.00, 



$100,000 Approved Securities, deposited with the Cali- 
fornia Htate Department m Security for 
Policy holders everywhere. 



LELAND STANFORD President 

J. H. UAKKOLL Vice-President 

JOS, OUACKBON Secretary 

All Policies issued by this Company, and the proceeds 
thereof, am exempt from execution by the laws of Cal- 
forula. THE ONLY STATE IN THE UNION that pro- 
vide for this exeinption. 

WPolicits iBHu..d by this Company are nonforfeita- 
ble, and all pmfltB are divided among the insured. 

Policies may be made payable in Gold or Currency, 
as the applicant may elect, to pay his premium. 

Executive Committee : 
Lklamd Staktokd, J. H. CAsnoix, 

Rout. Hamilton, Samusl Lavenbok, 

J as. Casolan. 



SCHREIBER & HOWELL, 
II-2i)-eow-bp-3m . General Agents, Sacramento. 



Anglo-Californian Bank. 

LIMITED. 

Successors to J. Seligrman & Co. 

London Office .No. 3 Angel Court 

San Francisco Office No. 412 California street. 

Authorized Capital Stock, $6,000,000, 

Subscribed, $3,000,000. Paid in, $1,600,000. 
Remainder subject to call. 

DIBECTOB8 in LONDON— Hon. Hugh McOulloch, Reuben 
D. SaKsoon, William F. Scho (field, Isaac Seligman, Julius 
Sington. 

ilANAGEBS: 

F. F. LOW and IOMTZ STEBfHABT, 
San Fbancisco. 



The Merchants' Exchange Bank 

OP SAN FBAHCI8CO. 

Capital, One Million Dollars. 

0. W. KELLOOO President. 

H. F. HASTINGS Manager. 

B. N. VANBBDNT Cashier. 

BANKING HOUSE, 
No. 423 California street, San Francisco. 

Kototze Brothers, Bankers, 

12 WALL STREET, NEW YORK, 

Allow interest at the rate of Four per cent, npo? 

daily balances of Gold and Currency. 
Receive consignments of Gold, Silver and Lead 

■Bullion, and make Cash advances thereon. 
Invite Correspondence from Bankers, Mining 

Companies, Merchants and Smelting Works. 

French Savings and Loan Society, 

411 Bush street, above Kearny SAN FRANCISCO 

4v27tf G. MAHE, Director. 



kim directory. 



UILKS B. QBAT. 



JAMES H. HiTEB. 



CtRAY & HAVEN, 

ATTORNEYS AND COUNSELORS AT L.A \V 

In Bnlldlng of Pacific Insurance Co., N. E. corner Call 

Yorniaand Leidesdorff streets, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



JOHN ROACH, Optician, 

429 Montgomery Street, 

. W. corner Sacramento. 

[Vm t instruments made, repaired and adjusted 

22vl7-3m 



JOSEPH GILLOTT'S 

STE EL PE NS. 
Sold by al [ Pcalora throughout the World. 



WH. BABTL1DO. 



HENRY KIMBALL. 



BARTLING & KIMBALL, 
BOOKBINDERS, 

Paper Kuleis and Blank Book Manufacturers. 

SOS Olar street, (southwest cor. Sansome), 
15vl2-3m SAH FRANCISCO 

BENJAMIN MORGAN, 

Attorney at Law and Counselor in Patent Cases 

Office, 207 Sansome Street, S. F. 

Refers to Dowey & Co., Patent Agents ; Judge S. 
Heydenfeldt or H. H. Halght. 6v28-3m 



fHachipery. 



BALL'H 

SWEEPING DREDGE, 

A NEW AND VALUABLE 

CALIFORNIA INVENTION, 

Has been very lately well proven by per- 
forming a Job of dredglnir at the mouth of 
San Antonio Creek, at Oakland, Cal. 



There la but this one machine that lias ercr hail tlu-Be 
Improvement* employed. It Is an old machine, for- 
merly built for another dovlco, and 1b unfavorably cou- 
Mtfurtrd fur Ball's Improvements; yet this tli^t tempo- 
rary experimental machine has filled a bcow of eighty- 
five cubic yards In sixteen minutes in unfavorable dig- 
ging. For durability, digging hard muterial and fast 
work, it has a reputation (supported by leading engi- 
neers) an haying no equal. 

Tt-Kt iiium ialti ami references will be given on appli- 
cation to the Inventor, who Is the solo owner of patents 
(excepting having made an assignment of the one ma- 
chine now belonging to the Central Pacific Railroad 
Company) Having resolved not to sell any rights 
unless upon a basit of actual work performed by a 
machine built by myself for the purpose of fairly es- 
tablishing the worth of the invention, I therefore offer 
to sell machines or rights on the following plan, which 
Is warranting the capacity of the machine by actual 
work: 

I will enter into an agreement with any responsible 
purty to build and sell a machine, scows and tender, 
all complete, and right of all my improvements in 
dredging machines throughout the Pacific Coast for 
$2u,000, warranting the machine to dredge six cubic 
yards per minute (to fill a bcow at that rate) . $20,000 
will but little more than pay the cost of building the 
machine, scows, etc., all complete; therefore I am pro- 
posing to ask notfiinff for my patents unless my machine 
dredges more than six cubic yards per minute. But 
it shall be further agreed that in case (at a fair trial to 
be mado within a stated time) the machine shall fill 
a scow at the rate of more than Bix cubic yards per 
minute, then $10,01)0 shall be added to the price above 
stated for each and every such additional cubic yard 
tbus dredged per minute, and for additional fractions 
of a cubic yard thus dredged in the Bame ratio the 
$10,000 is to be added to said price above Btated. 

I will sell any otherTorritorial or State rightB (either 
Unlied States or Foreign) upon the same plan and at a 
lower price proportionately than the rights for the 
Pacific Coast. 

I will sell a single machine with scows and all com- 
plete, and right to use the same in a limited territory, 
for $20,000 on the same plan as above slated, but will 
odd only $2,000 to each additional yard over the six 
cubic yards per minute. Each machine is not to em- 
ploy more than two 10x20 inch engines. 

Payments to be made in 0. S. gold coin on delivery 
of machine, as may be indicated by agreement. 



Address, 



9v28-tf 



JOHN A. BALL,, 

Oakland. 




WATER TANKS of any capacity, made entire 
by machinery. Material the best in use; constmctio 
not excelled. Attention, dispatch, satisfaction. Cost 
less than elsewhere. 

WELLS, RUSSELL & CO., 

Mechanics' Mills, Cor. Mission & Fremont Streets. 
3v28-3m-sa 



BLACK DIAMOND FILE WORKS. 




O. & 1-1. EABNETT, 

Manufacturers of Piles of every Description 

Nob. 39, 41 and 43 Richmond Btreet, 
Philadelphia, Fa. 

Sold by all the principal hardware stores on th 
Pacific Coast. 18v25.1y 



Every Mechanic 

Should have a copy of Brown's 

507 MECHANICAL MOVEMENTS, 

Illustrated and described. 

InventorB, model makers and ameature mechanics 
and students, will find the work valuable far beyond 
its cost. Published by Dewey & Co., Patent Agents 
and publishers of the Mining and Scientific Press. 

Price, post paid, $1. 



STEAM ENGINES AND BOILERS 

Of all sizes — from 2 to 60-Horse power. Also, Quartz 
Mills, Mining Pumps, Hoisting Machinery, Shafting, 
Iron Tanks, etc. For sale at the loweBt prices by 

10v27tf J. HENDY, No. 32 Fremont Street. 



Trade? apd (flapyfactte. 



PACIFIC 

Electro-Depositing Works, 

Nickel Plating, 

Silver Plating, 

Gold Plating, 

Copper. Plating, 

OJ THE HIGHEST STYLE OF THE AST. 



MINING PLATES 



EXTRA QUALITY AT LOW PRICES. 



Old Plated Ware Re-Plated 



GOOD AS NEW. 



Works, 134, ©utter Street, ©. V*. 

13v29-tf 



Glasgow Iron and Metal Importing Co. 

Have always on hand a large Stock of 

Bar and Bundle Iron, Sheet and Plate Iron 

Boiler Flues, Gasand Water Pipe. Cast 

Steel. Plow and Shear Steel, Anvils, 

Cumberland Coal, Etc 

WM. McCRINDLE, Manager, 22 & 24 Fremont St., S. F. 

mS-mi 



ARE YOU GOING 
TO PAINT ? 

THEN USE THE BEST. 
THE AVERILL CHEMICAL PAINT 

WILLLAST THREE TIMES AS LONO as the best lead 
and oil, without CHALKING; is of any desired color. 
It is prepared for Immediate application, requiring no 
Oil, Thinner or Drier, and does not spoil by standing 
any length of time. It is equally as good for inside as 
outside work; over old work as well as new; in fact, 
where any paint can be UBed the AVEltILL CHEMICAL 
PAINT will be found superior to any other. Any one 
can apply it who can use a brush, which truly makes it 
the FAKMER'3 FRIEND. 

IT IS JUST THE PAINT FOR THE AGE. 
IT IS SOLD BY THE GALLON ONLY. 

One gallon covers 20 square yards 2 coats. 

For further information Bend for sample card and 
price list. 

MANUFACTURED BY 

The California Chemical Paint Company. 

TYLER BEACH, Pres't. M. C. JEWELL, Sec'y. 

Office— Corner Fourth and TownBend streets, San 
FranciBco . 16 v7-eow-bp-3m 



Froiseth's New Sectional, Topographical 
and Mineral 

MAP OF UTAH. 

SIZE, 40 by 56 Inches ; Scale, 8 Milks to AN INCH. 

Handsomely engraved on stone, colored in counties 
and mounted on cloth, showing the Counties, Towns, 
Rivers, Lakes, Railroads, MineB and Mining Districts 
throughout the Territory, and all Government Surveys 
made to date. Price, mounted, $8; Pocket form, $5, 
— ALSO— 

New Mining- Map of Utah, 
Showing the boundaries of the principal mining dis- 
tricts, some 30 in number, adjacent to Salt Lake City. 
Price, pocket form, $2.50. 

—also — 
Froiseth's New Map of Little Cottonwood 

Mining District and "Vicinity 

Showing the - location of some 400 mines and tunnel 
sites, together with the mines surveyed for D. S. Pat- 
ent. Price $3. For sale and mailed to any part of the 
globe, on receipt of price, by A. L. BANCROFT k CO., 
A. ROMAN k CO., and LeCOUNT BROS. & MANSUR, 
San Francisco. 10v25-tf 



Brittan, Holbrook & Co., Importers of 

Stovesand Metals. Tinners* Good3, TooIb and Machines; 
111 and 11 California St., 17 and 19 Davis St., San Fran- 
cisco, and ITS J St., Sacrarcento, mr.-ly 



(detalllirgy apd Ore?. 



JOHN TAYLOR & CO., 

rMPOKTERB OF AND DEALERS IK 

ASSAYERS" MATERIALS 

Chemical Apparatus and Chemicals, 

Druggists' Glassware and Sundries, 

PHOTOGRAPHIC GOODS, ETC., 
812 and 514 Washington Btreet. SAN FRANCISCO 

We would call the special attention of Assayera 
Chemi6t8, Mining Companies, Milling Companies 
froepectore, etc., to our large and well adapted stock 

ASSAYERS' MATERIALS 

— AND — 

Chomical Apparatus, 

Having been engaged in furnishing ttiese supplies sine* 
the first discovery of mines on the Pacific Ceast. 

t&~ Our Gold and 811ver Tables, showing the value 
per ounce Troy at different degrees of fineness, and val- 
uable tables for computation of assays in Grains 
Grammes, will be sent free upon application. 

7v25-tf JOHN TAYLOR ft CO. 



Varney's Patent Amalgamator. 

These Machines Stand Unrivaled. 

For rapidity pulverizing and amalgamating ores, they 
have no equal. No effort has been, or will bo spared 
to have them constructed in the most perfeot manner 
and of the great number now in operation, not one has 
ever required repairs. The constant and increaeing de- 
mand for them is sufficient evidence of their merits. 

They are constructed so as to apply Bteam directly 
into the pulp, or with steam bottomB, as desired. 

This Amalgamator Operates as Follows; 

The pan being filled, the motion of the muller forces 
the pulp to the center, where it is drawn down through 
the apperture and between the grinding surfaces. — 
Thence itisthrown to the periphery into the quicksilver. 
The curved plates again draw it to the center, where it 
passes down, and to the circumference as before. Thus 
it is constantly passing aregular flow between the grind- 
ing surfaces and into the quicksilver, until the ore is 
reduced to an impalpable powder, and the metal amal- 
gamated. 

Setlers made on the same principle excel all others 
They bring the pulp so constantly and perfectly in con- 
tact with quicksilver, that the particles are rapidly and 
completely absorbed. 

Mill-men are invited to examine these pans and setlers 
for themselves, at the office, 229 Fremont Street, 

San Franciao* 



Nevada Metallurgical Works, 

21 First street San Francisco. 



Ores worked by any process. 

Ores sampled. 

Assaying in all, its branches. 

Analysis of Ores, Minerals, Waters, etc. 

Plans furnished for the most suitable pro- 
cess for working Ores. 

Special attention paid to the Mining and 
Metallurgy of Quicksilver. 

E. N. RIOTTE, 

C. A. LTJCKHARDT, 

Mining' Engineers and Metallurgists. 

RODGERS, MEYER & CO.. 

COMMISSION MEBCHANTiS, 

AllVAHES MADE 
On t.11 kind, of Ore., and particular attention 

PAID TO 

OONSieNMSNTS OF CUIUI, 
lTlfl-Sm 



LEOPOLD KUH, 

(Formerly of the U. S. Branch Mint, g. F.) 

Assayer and Btetallnrgfiea] 

CHEMIST, 

No. 011 Commercial Street, 

(Opposite the U. S. Branch Mint , 

San Fbanoisoo Oil. 7v21-3m 

PLATINUM 

Vessels, Apparatus, Sheet, Wire, Etc, Etc, 

For all Laboratory and Manufacturing Purposes 
H. M RAYNOR, 
35 Bond street, New York. 
Platinum Scrap and Native Platinum purchased. 



California Assay Office — J. A. Mars & 

Wm.Irelan, Jr., Chemists and Assayera, Rooms 47 and 
48 Merchants' Exchange, San Francisco. Analysis of 
Ores. Mineral Waters, Etc. 8v28-3m 




Self-Fastening 
Bed-Spring. 

We manufacture all sizes of BED and FURNITURE 
SPRINGS, from No. 7 to the smallest Pillow Spring; 
also, the Double Spiral Spring, which is the most dura- 
ble Bed Spring in use. It is adapted to upholstered or 
skeleton beds. We have the 6ole right in this State to 
make the celebrated Obermann Self-Fastening Bed 
Spring. Any man can make his own spring bed with 
them. They are particularly adapted to Farmers' and 
Minors' use. Send for Circulars and Price List to 

WARNER & SILSBY, 

14v28-eow-bx>3m 147 New Montgomery St., S. F 



12 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



[January 2, 1875. 



Trouble at the Cornell Watch Factory. 

The workmen at the Cornell watch factory 
in this city, who have been engaged for several 
weeks in putting np the machinery, which 
is now about ready for starting, became aware, 
a day or two since, that it was the intention of 
the proprietors to introduce Chinese labor into 
that establishment. These workmen, who 
have devoted several years to acquiring their 
trade, and who have been brought here from 
Chicago, on account of their especial skill in 
the art of watch making, fear that if they in- 
struct the Chinese in the practice of their art, 
that these people will soon supplant them in 
the business, by virtue of their known capacity 
for soon becoming skillful in everything re- 
quiring light and delicate manipulation. 

Moved by these considerations several meet- 
ings have been held to consider the subject and 
confer with Mr. Cornell, the principal proprie- 
tor, the result of which, so far, as it has 
transpired up to the time of our going to press 
leaves the matter in rather a ticklish condition 
for both the workmen and the company. 

Out of some 70 hands it appears that only 
three of the foremen and eight of the men, 
manifest any disposition to remain. All the 
others proclaim it as their intention to return 
East, and seek employment in other factories, 
if Mr. Cornell continues to insist on his original 
intention. 

This unexpected obstacle in the way of es- 
tablishing a "new and important industry on 
this coast is greatly to be regretted, and we 
earnestly hope that some compromise will be 
devised undwr which these n^wly arrived arti- 
zans.cao feel it to their interest to remain with 
us. We are not advised as to Lhe particular 
class of labor to which it fs propos d to assign 
the Chinese, bnt cm hardly suppose it is the 
intention of Mr Cornell to instruct them in 
anything beyond some light, simple processes, 
which perhaps might be advantageously turned 
over to some of our own girls or boys. 



The Japanese Persimmon. — This tree is be 
ginning to attract the attention of our fruit- 
growers. Those who have seen the fruit in 
Japan pronounce it very fine, unlike anything 
gro^n in this country. General Capron, for- 
mer Commissioner of Agriculture, and since 
for several years residing in Japan, states: 
"That the persimmon is the best of all the na- 
tive fruits of that country, and well worthy of 
introduction in California." The tree is de- 
scribed as finely shaped, having a rich, dark 
green foliage, and is an ornament anywhere. 
It produces fruit in Japan in from six to eight 
years from the seed. It would not be surpris- 
ing if it came into bearing earlier with us. The 
experiments of Messrs. Shinn & Co., nursery- 
men, at Niles, Alameda county, show conclu- 
sively that our soil and climate is well Buited 
to this foreigner. They have several thousand 
successfully grown, large enough for orchard 
planting. We gladly notice any effort on the 
part of our culturists to introduce valuable 
fruit and other trees. The successful intro- 
duction of one choice variety will repay for 
many failures. 

The Pacific Coast Pulpit, for Dec, cor. 
tains the sermon of Rev, W. H. Piatt — "The 
Immortality of the Soul." Each volume will 
contain some of the most notable sermons of 
the year. Price $2. Chas. _ P. Wbitton, 
short-hand reporter is the managing publisher, 
Montgomery block, S. F. 

Skagit Valley, W. T., is looming up. The 
latest mineral development in that region is an 
extensive coal field a few miles up the river, 
where coal can be obtained to an unlimited 
extent on the surface without going to the 
usual expense of underground tunnelling. 

New machinery for sinking the shaft of the 
Pbil Sheridan mine deeper has been ordered. 
The Utah mine on the north and the Sierra 
Nevada on the south, both being worked 
deeper, keep the Phil Sheridan pretty well 
drained, of water. 



The drift run west from the shaft of the 
Hale & Norcross on the 2100-foot level did not 
disclose any solid body of ore, although the 
vein formation which it penetrated was of the 
most favorable character. 



The new Quicksilver Mining companv or- 
ganized to work the ground of the old Welch 
company near Clayton, are now putting up fur- 
naces calculated to smelt twelve tons of cinna- 
bar rock a day. 



Woek is progressing favorably at the Gwin 
mine, Calaveras county. The last sinking of 
one hundred feet in the main shaft is nearly 
completed. When done, the depth of 1,000 ft. 
will have been reached. 



Large quantities of coal are being baulfd 
from the lone mines, to be used in tho quartz 
mills at Sutter Creek and other localities. 



Between 150 and 200 men are employed 
near the mouth of Sonoma creek in the work 
of reclaiming overflowed lands. 



General News Items. 

Shooting. — The emotional mania for shoot- 
ine seems to be on the increase. Some woman 
i3 generally at the bottom of such trouble and 
not unfrequently does the shooting herself, i 
The latest instance of such a case occurred in j 
this city last week. A woman named Annie 
Smytbe, shot Mr. M. G. Cobb, a lawyer of this 
city as he was passing along Washington* street 
near Montgomery. The wound was at first 
thought to be fatal, but Mr. Cobb is now in a 
fair way for recovery. The woman has been 
arrested. The only cause assigned was a suppo- 
sition on her part that he was mismanaging a 
land case in which she was interested, for 
which there was no reason whatever. It is 
charitably thought by many that the woman, 
who is a widow, was insane. 

Fatal Political Quabbel. — Mr. Byerly, ed- 
itor of the New Orleans Bulletin, having east 
some severe reflections upon ex-Governor War- 
moth, a challenge had passed, or was about to 
pass, when, the two accidentally meeting in the 
street, Byerley knocked Warmoth down and 
jumped upon him. During the fight Warmouth 
drew a knife and stabbed his antagonist several 
times in the abdomen, from the effects of which 
he died the next day. Warmoth has been ar- 
rested. Byerley was a Northern man and a 
political opponent of Warmouth. 

Hawaiian Annexation. — Washington news- 
paper correspondents state that the General 
Government is striving to induce the King of 
the Hawaiian islands to use his influence for 
annexation. Undoubtedly annexation would 
be of great advantage to the Sandwich islands, 
and incidentally to California. The islands 
would also be of advantage as a way station to 
the nation at large. 

Two Boys Charged with Pabbicide. — Two 
sons of Jacob Nerswinder who lived 15 miles 
north of Columbus, Ohio, have been arretted 
charged with having murdered their father 
and then burned his body. The boys are 
fourteen and eighteen ysars old. The family 
deserted their house, and the remains of Mr. 
Nerswinder have been found among the ashes 
in the fire place. 

P. M. S. S. Investigation.— The examina- 
tion of Mr. Irwin before the Congressional In- 
vestigation Committee proceeds slowly. Mr. 
Irwin don't "pump" as well as it was thought 
he would. It has transpired, however, that 
large sums of the company's money went into 
the hands of the Congressional postmaster, 
but for what purpose, or where it went subse- 
quently, has not transpired. 

The Gebman Chubch Contboveest — It is 
reported that Queen Victoria has written to 
Emperor William urging bim to compromise 
the ecclesiastical conflict in Germany. The 
report is of doubtful authority, and Germany 
is generally supposed to be pretty well calcu- 
lated to mind her own business, and the 
Catholics don't compromise worth a cent. 

Deowned. — Wm. Farmer was drowned 
while trying to cross the Eel river at the Fort 
Seward ford, on the 29th of November. He 
started to cross the river on horseback, and his 
horse failed or refused to swim, and Farmer, 
who could not swim, was washed from his 
back and drowned. 

Emigeant Ship Bubned. — News has been re- 
ceived of the burning of the English emigrant 
ship "Cospatrick," while on the voyage from 
London to New Zealand. Four hundred and 
sixty lives were lost. Farther details are anx- 
iously awaited. The vessel and cargo are a 
total loss. 

Cuban Annexation. — A letter to the Diario 
reports that strong efforts are being made in 
Washington to obtain the recognition of Cu- 
bans as belligerents. . The letter couples the 
names of Aldama and Collector Casey with 
these efforts, and says that the object is to 
throw on the market Cuban bonds held in 
Washington. 

Deaths Last Week. — During the last week 
79 persons died in this city, 51 males and 28 
females. Of these 68 were white, 1 colored, 
and ten copper colored persons. There were 
3 casualties, 1 homicide and 17 persons died in 
public institutes. 

Gebeitt Sb^th Dead.— This well known 
philantrophist died suddenly in New York on 
Monday fast, of apolexy. He had just arrived 
in that city to spend the Christmas holidays 
with his friends. 

The great ship "Three Brothers" went to 
sea on Monday with 4,000 long tons of wheat 
in her bold. She was taken out by two tugs. 
This is the most magnificent specimen of naval 
architecture that carries sails. 

Hoese Beef. — The horse shambles of Paris 
supplied the public during the first quarter of 
the present year with nearly 630,000 pounds of 
meat, the result of the slaughter of 1,555 
horses, mules and asses. 

Fatal Accident.— Patrick Smith, foreman 
and section man on the California Pacific Rail- 
road at Napa Junction, stumbled across the 
track on Monday morning with such force that 
he died almost instantly. 

Califobnia Bivees. — The proposition pend- 
ing before Congress to expend a small sum of 
money to improve California rivers ought to 
receive favorable consideration. But $57,000 
are required for the Sacramento River. 

Railway Acoident in England. — Several 
persons were killed and many wounded by a 
railroad accident at Woodstock on Thursday 
last. Some of the latter are fatally wounded. 



Steange. — The extraordinary character of 
the present season seems to puzzle the animal 
as well as the vegetable kingdom. ' We have al- 
ready noticed the fact that the trees seems to be 
puzzled to know what to do, and now we find 
the birds equally at a loss. The Mountain 
Messenger of December 12th savs: A nest of 
young birds was recently hatched in Judge 
Davidson's orchard. What does this mean. 
Won't some prophet investigate this unusual oc- 
currence and tell an anxious people what sort 
of a winter it foreshadows? 

A Thoroughbred Importing Association. — 
Articles of incorporation of the California Con- 
federacy were filed yesterday. The purposes 
for which the corporation isformed are, the im- 
portation of thoroughbred horses into this 
State, and the improvement of the breed. The 
directors are G-eorge M. Pinney, Ezekiel Wil- 
son, J. S. Taylor, A.E.Swain, John Martin, 
O. F. Willey and William Shear. The capi.al 
stock is $50,000, divided into 500 shares of the 
value of $100 each. 

Change in the Weatheb. — The weather 
during the past ten days has taken a new turn, 
and it is extremely cold for San Francisco; over- 
coats out of doors and fires within are in de- 
mand, and frost and thin coatings of ice are 
discemable in the morning. In Los Angeles 
the late severe frosts have seriously damaged 
the promising tobacco crop at Agricultural 
Park. This is the longest cold term ever 
known in Los Angeles. Considerable anxiety 
is also felt in regard to holding off the usual 
December rains. 

Industrial Items. 

The Navy Yabd. — Eighty-two men are em- 
ployed at the present time in the construction 
department at the navy yard, as follows: Ten 
men are engaged in boat building in that de- 
par'ment. There are twentv-flve blacksmiths, 
twenty-two ship joiners, three block makers, 
five spar makers, two pattern makers, seven 
plumbers, and eight in the saw mill. 

An Industrial Colony. — Westminster Col- 
ony is still on the march of improvement. 
Several houses are nearly completed, and were 
it not for the scarcity of lumber and carpen- 
ters others would at once be erected. The 
school is flourishing, the plows are busy, the 
corn crop excellent, and the number of trees 
to be planted this season will be greatly in- 
creased. 

Steamship Expenses. — Some idea of the 
expenses attending the trial trip of a large 
steamship may be had when it is known that 
the trial trip of the "City of Pekin" to Newport 
with a large number of guests, cost $50,000. 
Delmonieo's bill for the entertainment was 
about $25,000. 

The estimated cost of a ship canal from 
Stockton to Disappointment slough, eleven 
miles, is $1,117,000. Such a work is greatly 
needed, and would be of immense benefit in 
opening up the San Joaquin valley. . 

Twenty tons of coal per day are used at the 
Starr mills, in V^llejo. which at present rates 
costs about $130. One vessel is kept con- 
stantly running to supply fuel for this great 
flouring establishment. Fifteen car-loads of 
wheat are ground every twenty-four hours. 

Anotheb Woolen Mill. — Active efforts are 
being taken to secure the erection of a woolen 
mill at Merced. The sum of $32,000 has al- 
ready been paid up. It is proposed to go into 
the manufacture of mixed fabrics — woolen and 
cotton. 

Ibon Woeks at Santa Claba. — An effort is 
being made to get up a joint stock company at 
Santa Clara, with a capital of 100,000, for the 
purpose of obtaining the location of J. T. 
Walker & Co's iron works there. 

The Anaheim branch of the Southern Pa- 
cific Railroad is now within seven miles of 
Anaheim. The track will be completed by the 
1st of January. ■ 

The San Jose woolen mill company is making 
weekly shipments of goods to St. Louis, Chi- 
cago and Boston. The shipments of late have 
consisted of doeskins, oassimeres and blankets. 

A New Industry. — One hundred and sixty 
acres are being planted to peppermint at 
Milipitas, Santa Clara county, by W. Boete. 

Thbee hundred and fourteen men are em- 
ployed at the gunpowder works near Santa 
Cruz. 

The Sacramento beet sugarie will this year 
plant from 1,500 to 2,000 acres in beets. 

Theee are eight vessels contracted to be 
built on Humboldt bay. 

The Pacheco-road pass over the Coast raDge 
has been completed, at a cost of about $18,000. 

A company has been organized for construct- 
ing a new hall at Monterey. 

Salt Lake boasts of 200 new houses this 
year. 

Mayob Tobeeman, of Los Angeles, estimates 
the population of the city at 13,000. 

The San Luis Obispo waterworks have been 
completed. 

A handsome hotel is being erected at Felton, 
Santa Cruz county. 

The wharf at Wilmington- is about to be ex- 
tended 1,000 feet. 

Since April 1st 29,102 immigrants have ar- 
rived overland. 



Patents & Inventions. 



A Weekly List of U. S. Patents Is- 
sued to Pacific Coast Inventors. 

[Fbom Official Reports foe the Mining and Scien- 
tific Press, DEWEY & CO., Publishers and 
0. S. and Foreign Patent Agents.] 

By Special Dispatch, Dated Washington, 
D. C, Dec. 29th, 1874. 

Fob Week Ending Dec. 15th, 1874.* 

Tiee Upsetteb. — Quintus C. Tebbs, Windsor. 

Cal. 
Windmill. — William C. Nelson, Sacramento, 

Cal. 

Alarm Combination Lock. — Henry W. Dilg, 

Portland, Oregon. 
Overalls. — Cheang Qnan Wo, S. F., Cal. 
Artificial Stone.— Aohille Berard, Oakland, 

Cal. 

Trademark, 
Fob Cocoantjt Preparations. — The California 

Cocoanut Pulverizing Company, S. F, t Cal. 

*The patents are not ready for delivery by the 

Patent Office until some 14 days after thedate of iBsue. 
Note. — Copies of TJ. 8. and Foreign Patents furnished 
by Dewey & Co., in the shortest time possible (by tel- 
egraph or otherwise) at the lowest rates. All patent 
business for Pacific coast inventors transacted with 
perfect security and in the shortest time possible. 



Agricultural Items. 

Four Crops of Peabs in one Season. — The 
Footlull Tidings of a recent date is responsible 
for the following: Four crops of pears from one 
tree in nne season is one of those stories for 
wbicu California is famous, but which people 
East seldom behVve. Any one who will take 
the pains to walk out lo neir the end of Neal 
street in this town can satisfy himsr If that such 
thiugs do happen. Mr. Barker has a winter 
Nelis pbrtr tree in his orchard that baa blossomed 
four separate and distinct times this yeir and 
now has uponit four orops of pears. Ouly the 
first and second crops are perfect, the others 
beiDg small and immatnre. 

Answers to Questions. — A subscriber at 
Anaheim asks the following questions: First, 
will the Muscat Alexandra do well on Bandy 
soil? Second, in what month should decidu- 
ous trees be budded? Third, what month is 
considered the best for planting blue gum seed? 

Answers: First, yes; on "sandy soil," but 
not on pure sand. Second, in August and 
September. Third, amateurs would do well to 
wait until February or March before planting 
blue gum seed. 

Of the 14.000 acres of arable land comprising 
Sherman island, it is estimated that 10,000 
acres are already sown to wheat and barley. 
Several hundred acres of volunteer grain stand 
six inches high. 

Thebe are no new developments regarding 
the potato rot in Sonoma county. Nearly all 
not dug before the Ifite rains are ruined. About 
50,000 sacks are stored in Petaluma. 

Seth Bennett, farmer, on Dry creek, So- 
noma county, gathered from one vine of Mission 
grapes 100 pounds of grapes, whioh, if made 
into wine would have produced eight gallons. 

Fresh butter is arriving at Petaluma in con- 
siderable quantities, and is selling from 43 to 
45 cents per pound, or 6 cents higher than last 
year. 

Mesquite grass is being sown extensively in 
Lake and Mendocino counties. It is said to be 
fine for hay, and rich green feed. Neither 
frost, wet, nor ordinary dry weather affects it. 

"When all her land is properly reclaimed, 
Sutter county will have added fully one half 
more to the amount of land now under cultiva- 
tion. 

Santa Claba county is sending more grain 
East this year than ever before. 

The capacity of the Consolidated Tobacco 
factory nt Gilroy is about to be doubled. 

Thibty seven vessels have loaded wheat at 
South Vallejo this season. 

A new ledge with very promising appear- 
ances has been found on the southwestern side 
of the ridge back of Pioche. The ledge is of 
good size, and contains ore that assays well. 
The owners are Murphy, Jones & Co. 

The covered car track leading from the Con- 
solidated Virginia mi e to the mill of the same 
company is about completed. The rail for the 
cars is laid about half-way thiougli and the 
woodwork is all done. 



The Calaveras Chronicle reports that the Mo- 
kelumne Hill Canal and Mining company are 
negotiating for the purchase of Overton's ditch, 
at Rich Gulch flat. 



The Home Cure that Never Fails. — "The atmos- 
phere of piny woods is good for '"'Tieumptive patientB' 
s»ys Dr. Erastus Wilson. No d mot it is; but Hale's 
Honey of Horehound and Tar, charged with the con- 
centrated essence of the most vn.utible of all medicinal 
trees, the Abies Balsamea, or Balm of Gilead, and tem- 
pered with the purifying and healing juice of the hore- 
hound plant and with the pureBt honey, will do more 
in one day to cure a cough or cold than the air of pine 
woods could do in a twelve-month. 

Pike's Tooth-Ache Drops — Cure in one minute 



Woodward's Gabdens embraces an Aquariam. Mu- 
seum, Art Gallery, Conservatories, Tropical Houses, 
menngerie Seal Ponds, and Skating Hint. Admission, 
25 cents; children, 10 cents. 



January 2, 1875.] 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



13 



METALS. 

Wkd.smiht It, Dec. 30, 1874. 



American Pi* Iron, V ton . 
Suouin I'm Imn.H ion.... 
WbttcPis. >_ton.- 

Owl 



(g 46 Oil 

. « 00 « 48 00 

. KB *6 l>0 

. (fi 40 Oil 



- V* 

- 5** 



K«hu«d Bar, bad •Mortnient, * tt> . . . 

Refined Iter, «ood a»*ortro«nt, V ft M 

BoiUr, No. I lo 4 .. *3 

Plat«. No. A to S § 

brieut. No. 10 to 13... .. ^ 

Shoet. No. 14 to W — - g 

8bMl,No.iUo'il -; ■« I 

Hor»8ho*»a.|>er kotf ... 1 W « 

{Tall Rod - »*'<! 

Norway Iron... — » « 

Hulled Iron ... - h ,<J 

Othnr Irons for Black»ra«ha. Miner*, etu. <c 

0>i-J-kb_- 

Brazier**.... — 3 J « 

I'n'd — « ffi 

U.N)«l'«l'>t — 50 § 

Sheathing. Jl ft 

Sheathing. Yellow 

Sbeathiruj. Old Yellow 

Co ' position Null. ^ 

1 .i-Tipo-M 100 Bolt* — 

T pUt«*Uh*rcoal, IX V bo* 13 00 g IS'O 

PUtoi. I U(,'h»rcoal 13 00 @ 4 *. 

BfWflDK flat... 1'J ■*■ i l> ,M ' 

lt*oc« Tit. Sl.be, * B> ~ WWfl M 

BTMrL.-KnitlMhf'ast.-Wft -W &g - '2ft 

AnOVr-fon Jc Wooile" American Caat. 1* — 1*»S 

brill '» - iG 'a 

Flat Rar - ' H «9 — '- 

Pl«a«h SU-1 -H« <« '000 

~ - ©- '» 

/.inc. Shoot — «# - 1'S 

NAiiit— A^rwdilwi .. 4 2ft H) 6 00 

gutOKriii.v.'.n jxir ft — — 



, — It 



■ 11 
G» — 24 

3 - MS 
« -- 



M 



GENERAL MERCHANDISE. 



Pacific Machinery Depot ! 



B. P. GREGORY, 
Empire Warehouse, 



Beetle ^ (r<Ti, neax Murlot , 



Francisco, Cal- 



DEWEY & CO 

American and Foreign 




BAUM. 

Rnv.Ktnnd Whl..— 
Detriuk's Machinu 

N.-w.-d. '.'!v... ]■; ,12 
do K W— 
du 20x40, do A....— 
Floor bucks -.■*•■ 
" Us. 
Stand. Ounnies.. 
Double seam... 
■ingle scam. ... 
" Wool Sacks, wi 
Baricy Bog" 24x31 13 
d.. 23XW - 

do 2 Is in — 

do Nx36 

Oat Ba K H. 24x40. .. 

do Wx»., - — 

H. Mali in 10-Mi gds 9'i 
do 4ft It)* 

HI 



1394 



i 2 75 



2«N 
27 



-,* 



12 



CAJIIVED CrOO 

AsHl'dPlo V raits 
in j 1 - lb emit- ISO e 
d-- Tallin do.. 3 'J 1 ■■■"■» 1 Ui* 
Jams A Jellies 3 7ft 01 4 00 
Pickles tf gl.. — {a) 3 50 

Sardines.qr box I 80 [yj 

do bf boxen. 3 20 ;q> 

i O A I. -".Johl.lnir. 
Australian, fUon 10 50 -<i I J 50 

Coos Bay (Sill JO 

HulllnKbam Bay. |9W 

Seattle (3)11— 

Oumberl'd.cka.. («)1R 00 

do bulk. ..it- mi an so 

Mt. Diablo 6 26 ®8 A0 

Lehigh ,'ajl7 Mi 

Liverpool 10 50 @U 60 

WeetHartley .... — 5)14 00 

Scotch In 00 will IH- 

Scranton (S)U 50 

Vancouver's IbI.. 11 DU@tl 50 
Charcoal, ^nk... 75 (at — 

Coke, ^bbl — @ 60 

COFFEE. 
Sandwich Inland — ® 22 
CentralAmenc'n 20 @ 22 
Costa Kioa per lb 2J 24 

Qa&temula 20 IS) 22 

Java — 

Manilla 19 

Ground in cs — — 

Chicorv 

PISH. 
Pao.Drv Ood.new 5 

oasfts 6 

do boneless.. ,. H 

Eastern Ood S 

Salmon in bblB..9 00 ft9 50 

do '-, bbls4 ftO (45 50 

do 2«tt.oan8 — ©2 80 

do 21b cans..2 05 402 78 

do lav cans .1 7ft ftO — 

DoOnl. K. Sib... — til — 

Piolu Ood. bbls.'-S 00 @ — 

do % bt.lsll 00 @ - 

Bos . Sm'k'dHt-r'^O (S 50 

Mack'l,No.l,'tblB9 00 rojll 00 

Extra.... — <&iL2 On 

" in kits.... 2 00 %2 ftO 

Ex mess. 3 U0 (3>'i 50 

'■ Ex mesa.Sbs- -W13 «0 

Pio'd Horr'e.bx.. 3 Ou m :i 50 

NAIIA 
Assorted size. tb. ft 37!-.'3,7 50 

O] EJ8L 
Paciflo Olne Co. 
Neat Pit No. 1. — @ 

Pure — 

Castor Oil, No.l.. — 
do do No.2.. - 

Cocoanut., ,1 4' 

Olive PlaKniol.. 
do Possel..,. 

Palm lb ! 

Linseed, raw - 

do boiled 

1 -tiimi nut in cs, 
Sperm, crude v% . 

do bleached. 1 90 (oi2 25 
Ooost Whales... 45 (a) — 
Polar, refined.... 50 «zi 52] 

Lard 1 15 (ajl 30 

Coal, reflrrerl Pet 37^W — 

Olenpbine 21 (a) 24 

Devoe's Bril't... 2ft <Q Z8 

Lon* Isluad 21 w 2i 

Enrska — (a) — 

Devne's Petro'm 2i 30 -4 
Barrel kerosene 21 fa) 21 



Wrdnkhday m., Doc. TO, 1874. 

lOhve I 20 ®9 %S 

—012 Downer KeroBe'e — VJ 37 
(las LlKht Oil... - (a) 26 
PAIXT8.- _ 
- :i I. , Atlan. W . Lead. 

— lanaSji'A'bitiQR 

. PuMy 

6 — 'OJ 7 iChalk 

P»ris White 

3 trfiU Ochre 

filt Venetian Kcd.. 
ld67Si Kcd Lead 

til Litharge 
U's En*. Vermillion 2 OO'a) 
(ajlft KKF. 
sgilfi China No. 1, # lb 
16 @l«'., do 2, do. 

— (gil7 Japan 

'in 9*i Siiiin Cleaned... 

Mil fatna 

iujlfl lawaiian 

■ irnliit.i. 

SALT. 

■Jal. Bav.perton 10 nOftflll 00 

do Common.. 5 00(a) 7 On 

Carmen Island. .ll 00o>13 00 

Liverpool fine... fa>24 00 

do coarse 1 6 OOio. 

SOAP. 

(Jastile ** »» 10 '0.1 11 

Tjncal brands ft (3) 8 

Spiojw. 

Cloves 50 ffl .^ 

Cissia 20 :g) U7 

Citron 33 fin 35 

NutmoK 1 -JO iui| 30 

Whole Pepper... 21 d) 23 

■imeoto - 3 15S 

r'nd Allsjpprdz — fall 12S 
do Cassia do .. — ml 50 
do Cloves do.. — Ml 50 
do MaBtard do — @1 20 
do Gin K erdo,. — @1 00 
do Pepper do.. — @l 00 
do Mace do.. . — (32 00 
N Hi A IE, r.TV.. 
Cal. Cnbe per lb., H'^qj — 
Pariz' Pro. Cube 
bblorlOOIbbxs — @ 11M 
do in 50 ft bxs.. - S 12 
do in 25 lb bxs. — (Si 12'-i 
Cirele-A crushed — @ Uv 

Powdered — f«>, U Ij 

Fine cruHhod... — (5) II .r 

(iruiiulateu — ffll 11 '-.j 

Golden O — 'dl 10 

Hawaiian 8 (Si 1) ; >.{ 

.California Beet. 10*i"a) »l*i 

ijnl. Syrllpin I :■-. — (a) 67,'-i 

do in ^ bis. — fa) 70 

do In kecs.. — 0v 75 

Hawaiian Molau- 

ses 28 (a) 30 

TEA. 
UolonR.Canton.Ib 19 @ 25 
do Ainoy... 2* (aj ,W 
do ForinoBa 40 : <» 80 
Tm perin 1. Canton 25 Ot 40 
do PinRsney 45 fa) 80 
do Moyune . 60 uv\ mi 
Ounpo'der.Oaiit. 30 @ 42S 
do Pink'suey SO (a) M0 
do Moyune. 05 (all 25 
Y'nR Ily., Canton 2H 01 40 
io PinEsuev 40 (ai 70 
do Moyuno.. 65 (a) 85 
Japan, ^ ehosts, 

bulk 30 @ 75 

Japun.lacquered 

bx3,4^and51ba 45 @ 67 

Japan <1 •>. J tb bxs 45 <m 90 

opl'nbx,4HIb 3ft @ " 




SAN FRANCISCO, 



Patents Obtained Promptly. 
Caveats Filed Expeditiously, 
Patent Reissues Taken Out. 
Patents Secured in Foreign Lands. 
Assignments Made and Recorded in Legal Form. 
Copies of Patents and Assignments Procured. 
Examinations of Patents made here and at 

Washington. 
Examinations made of Assignments Recorded 

in Washington. 



I Electric Minining Company— Principal 

ElaCC of business. San Frunci-i-o, Stme of California 
UCAtlon of works, Lincoln Mining District, Butte 
1 County, California. 

Notiov is li'i -L>> Kiven that at a meeting of the Board of 
Directors, held on the 29th day of November. I874 Ull 
tsseaameiit ot five cents prr share wm* lovied upon the 
LMtiital stuck of tha corpora tin n, payable Immediately, i u 
LniU'd Ststes Gold coin, to the >e«rvt«rv l at the omce 
of tli«' Cautpuny, In San KraticiBoo. 

Any stock upun whith thie ansesBinent Bhall remain uo- 
pald on tin' fourth day of January, 1M75, will be delta- 
<iu«nt,nnd advertinrd i,>r "ale at tmiilie auction, and untesu 
paymiiit is mnde bef-Te, will be s.ld qn Monday the 2Mb 
du oi J11 1 uury, 1B76, to pay the delinquent a*«ae'Bmnui 
togLtlier with cosiB o( udvert ihiiik and evpersea of salu * 

Olnce— Room 13, No. 3lHC'tililornia i*trt>vt. han Pnoclsoo 
Cal 



■•Golden Rule" Silver Mining Company — 

Principal place of busincHS, San FnuoUco, (; lif-rum 
Location of Works, Ui'bir Miiiihk District, Ut-ah Terri- 
tory. 

Notice Is hereby (riven, thst ot a meeting of llie 
Board of Dirt ct-.ru. held on tlif « h da' 01 December 

■..--•■: hK'llI Ml In ,■ , fl, :. I I.' 1 ■ Jiar- VVUs ItVied UpOtJ 

' '10 oorporation, payable immedintel v 
ind_silver coin to the Beontw? 



1M.4, an _ 

the ca ial »took of 1 

In Uniteil Slides Kuld . __ 

No. 530 Cay Btreei. S,,n Fruncisoo, California 

An\ elijik upon which tin- a BiSMiiie t nIuiII icnialn un- 
paid on the fiiteeuth duy of .lununry. IMS. will be duliu- 
iiiii-iit. und advertised for sale at public auctiou 
nless payment b» in ado before, will be sold on 



and 



Monday, t 

In 



s pay] 

lefilie 



nth day of February, IK' 



uay 01 feDruury, lat.'i, v> pay 
together with coBts of aav 



fc_> pay Che d.i- 
vertising 



_ _xpenses of sale. 

K. WrRTHF.IMER, Socrstary 
Office, 530 Clay street. San PrancJBOO, 1 ul. 



ExaminaUons Ordered and Sported by T K lk- the ..n.^d^of Nove,,,^ 



Interferences Prosecnted. 

Opinions Rendered regarding the Validity of 

Patents and Assignments. 

Rejected Cases taken up and Patents Obtained 

Every Legitimate Branch of Patent Agency Bus • 

iness promptly and thoronghly condncted. 

Sewd foe Cieotjlae. 



- «, 



@i 10 

V^i'St 32'$ 



Sole AgeDt for Pacific Coast for 
J. Fay & Co's Woodworking- Machinery 
Blake's Patent Steam Pumps, Tannite 
Co's Emery Wheels and Machinery, 
Fitchburg- Machine Co's Machin- 
ists' Tools, Fdson's Recording: 
Steam Gaug-e, Triumph Fire 
Extingnisher. 
Al60 on hand and for Sale': 
STCKTEVANT'S BLOWEBS AND EXHAUST FANS, 
JOHN A. ROBELINCTS SONS' W1KE ROPES, PUUE 
OAK TANNED LEATHER BELTING, PERIN'S' 
FRENCH BOND SAW BLADES, PLANER 
KNINES, NATHAN & DREIFUS GLASS 
OILERS, AND MILL AND MINING SUP- 
PLIES OF ALL KINDS. 
P. O. Box 168. 



5RpXtt~«n3* 



7000 IN use 




&mw 



0YE# 



Keystone Quartz Mining Company — 

Lu.mtion of principal pla'c of biudnf hh, Sau FrQncls- 

co, California. Locution of workn, Butte Township, 

Sierra County, California. 

Notice.— There are delinquent upon the following 
deHcribed Btock, on uccount of asseBHinent levied on 
"874. the K'v. ml amountB 
opi oBitu the iiuiin h of the respective shareholders, 
as follows: 

Nanit-s. No. Certificate. No. Shares. Amount 

CH Simpklns 37 1248 $1*48 00 

J Clem Uhler, trustee..... 66 500 600 00 

J Clem Uhler, trustee 67 274 274 1)0 

And In accordance with law, and an order of the 
Bo:ird of Directors, made on the tenth day of Novem- 
ber, 1874, so many shares of each parcel of said stock 
as maybe nccecsary will be sold at publio auction, at 
the salesroom of John Middleton k Son, No. 310 Mont- 
gomery street, San Francisco, on the eleventh day of 
January, 1876, at the hour of one o'clock p. m., of 
said day, to pay said delinquent assessment thereon, 
together with costs of advertising and expenses of sale. 
LOUIS VJlBARIA., Secretary. 
Office — Northwest corner Sansome and Fine BtreetB, 
San i'rancisco, Cal. dec20-3t 



19v27-eow-16p 



do s&l tb paper 30 (3 55 
TOBACCO- " 

Brit; In Navys... 
Dark do ... 
Dw.i f Twist... 
12 inch do ... 
Liubt ProsBCd. 
Hurt I do 
Conn. Wrap'r... 
Penn. Wraupcr 
Ohio do 
VirRi'aSiiiok'K 
Fine ct ohe'g.tri 
Fine cut chew- 
ing, buc'ts.ij* tti 
Banner tine cat. 

KarekA Cala 

TCRPiENTINF. 
Eastern..^ 55 m fill 



.1 •> hKlllIC 


50 


Ml 


W) 


50 


td) 


ft."! 


'J H 


W 


Yf 


till 


(at 


7(1 


VII 


m 


HO 


Ml 


<d) 


WI 


as 


m 


40 


'J0 


(0 


4.S 


15 


im 


70 


4,1 


(aj 


lb 


.« m 


(fljil 2ft 



..75 ($ 90 

. 9 110/ii 9 'J5 
[3)9 in 1 



LEATHER. 



Wednesday m., Dec. 30, 1874. 

Oity Tanned Laalber, 1* Tb i6«:29 

Santa Crna Leather, t^ lb 26,&29 

Country Leather, W lb 24(*aB 

Btookton Leather, & lb Wfl>29 

Jodot, 8 Kil., pordOZ ....$50 00® 54 0(1 

Jodot, tltoi9Kil.,pordoz 06 00(a) 90 Oil 

Jodot, second choice, 11 to 18 Kil. 1* doz 56 00(g) 72 ■*() 

Ooruellian, 12 to 16 Ko.... 67 00(g> 67 00 

Oornellian Females, 12 to 13 H3 00(g) 67 0"' 

Cornellian h .inates. 14 to- lfi Kll 71 <K«3 76 5» 

Simon Ullmo Females, 12 to 13, Kil 60 00(oJ h, tlO 

Simon Ulimu Fema.es, U to 15, Kil '.0 00^» 72 '0 

Simon Ullmo Females, 16 to 17, Kil 73 00 .5 75 0(1 

Simon, lb tul.,«doz bl 00® 63 |*U 

Simon. 20 Kil. ** doz. «5 00(g) 67 00 

Simon. 24 Kil. %* doz ;.. 72 00® 74 

Robert Calf, 7 and 9 Kil 80 IWigJ 40 '10 

French Kips, ^ Q) 1 W) (* 1 15 

California Kip, $ doz 40 00®, P 

Frenah Sheep, all colors, '# doz 3 (10® 16 Oli 

Eaatern Calf tor Backs, & lb 1 00® 1 25 

Sheep Roans for Topping, all colore, $ doz 9 00(g) 13 Olt 

Sheep Koans for Linings, *$ doz 5 .50® 10 50 

California RusBett Sheep LinmgB „ , 175® 4 50 

Best Jodot Calf Boot Lbkb, ^pair 5 oil. 3 5 25 

Good French Calf Boot Legs, ^ pair 4 00® 4 7;s 

French Calf Boot Legs,^ pair i 00® 

Harness Leather* $ lb 30® 37S 

Fair Bridle Leather, « doz 48 OH® 72 00 

Skirting Leather, $ A> »3® Si'-, 

Welt Leather, %* doz , 30 00® 50 OU 

Ban* Leather, ft foot 17® - 

Wax Side Leather. V foot 17® — 

Eastern Wax Leather... ............4... — r<a— — 




TO COPPER SMELTERS, BLUE-STONE 
& SULPHURIC ACID MANUFACTURERS. 



For ffaleor to Iflase the LEVIATHAN COPPER MINE, 
in Alpine county, California. 

The ore, which is in the form of silicate, black and 
red oxide, and .gray .sulphide, with metallic copper 
finely disseminated, averages from two to five feet 
thick, and 15 to 50 per cent, copper. A few parcels 
taken out during exploratory operations, realized $30,- 
000 for Bluestone. in siglit, 2,000 tons 20 per cent, ore; 
on dump, 300 tons 16 percent. Supply inexhaustible. 
Title perfect. Minimum present capacity, 10 tons per 
day, which maybe extende'd indefinitely. Cost of ex- 
traction, $2. There is ;aune * s'ratum of sandstone 20 
feet in thickness, impregnated with 26 per cent, pure 
sulphur. To a coin piurebaser highly advantageous 
terms will he offered. For further particulars apply to 
Leurs Chalmers, Silver Mountain, Alpine county, Cal, 



Martin and Walling Mill and Mining Com- 

Eunv Principal place of business, San Francisco, Cal. 
location of works, Coalterville District, Mariposa 

fount j . ' al. 

Notice is horehy giren, that at a meeting of the Board of 
Directors, held on ihotthday of December, 1874, an as- 
sessment (No. 1) offifty i50) conts per share was levied 
upon the capital stock 01 the corporation, payable im- 
mediately, in United States gold ci>in, to the Secretary, 
at the office of the company in San FransiBCO, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain un- 
paid on the £tn day of January, 1675. will be delinquent, 
and advertised fur sale at public auction, and unless 
payment is made before, will be sold on Saturday, the 
23d day of January, 1875, to pay the delinquent assessment 
together with costs of advertising and .'Xpenses of sale. 
J. W. TRIPP, Secretary, 

Office. — Room 6, 408 California street, San Francisco, 

Page Tunnel Company.— Location of 

Erinoipal place of business, San Francisco. California, 
ocation of works, Big Cottonwood District, Salt Lake 

County. Utah. 

Notice is hen-by given, that at a meeting of the Direc- 
tors, held on the 12th day of December, 1874, an assess- 
ment of five cents per share was levied upon the capital 
stock, of the corporation, payable immediately in United 
States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the office of the 
Company, Room 2, No, 408 Oalilonua street, San Francisco 
California. 

Any stock upon which this asBeasment shall remain un- 
paid on the 20th day of January, 1875, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction, and unleBs pay- 
ment is made before, will be *<old on the 20th day of Feb- 
ruary, 1875, to pay the delinquent assessment, together 
with costs of advertising and expenses of sale. 

JAOUB HARDY, Secretary. 

Office, Room 2, No. 408 California street, San Fr&noifloo, 
California. decl9-4t 



Mining and Other Companies. 



Calaveras Hydraulic Mining Company. 

Principal place of business, San Fmncisco, California. 
Location of works, CalaveraB county, State of Califor- 

Noticois hereby given, that at a meeting of the Trustees 
of said Company held on the 7ih day of December, 18i4, 
an assessment «£ five (5) cents per uliaro was levied upon 
the capital stock of said Company, payable immediately, 
in United .Stales .gold coin, to the Secretary of thv Com- 
pany in theOffioe of the Uniled Slates Internal Collec- 
tor, No. 321 Batter? street, San Francisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain un- 
paid on Saturday, (he ninth day of January, 18.5. shall be 
delinquent, und a&Tertised for sale at public auction, and 
unless payment ie mado before, will be sold on Monday, 
the iwenrrtfiith (2f-th) day of January, 1875, to pay, the 
delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising 
and expenses of sole. ABRAM SHEAR. Secretary. 

Office. No 321 Battery street, (office ot the U. S. fnter- 
.nal Revenue Collector.) Sau Francisco, Cal. decio-it 



California Beet Sugar Company.—Loca- 

tion of principal place of business, San Francisco, Cal- 
fornia. Location of works, Soquol, Santa Cruz County, 

■California. , , .. ■** j r 

IVotlce is hereby given, tbatat a meetlnK of the Board ot 
DH-eotors, held on the 23d day of Dccemher, B*4, an as- 
sen'Oient of Five Dollars per share was levied upon the 
oaaitaC stock of the corporation, payable immediately in 
UTlted States gold coin, to the secretary, at the office 
<rf the "Company. 314 California street, San Francisco, i.al. 

Awv Btock upon which this assessment snail remain un- 
noicl I ott the 31st uay of Jw.wy.W76 Will be delinquent 
and advertised for sale at publio auction, and unless 
mav-meatianiade before will be sold on the 21st day of 
February, 1876,1.. pay the delinquent assessment, together 

,««* .osta •^^«*«»l5tf I {\^!f c ( {ifjJ-» eCMtaI7 . 
•Sffiofe, No. 314 •ftlifornia street, San Franoisco, Cal. 



Theresa Mill and Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. Location of works Coulterville District, 
Mariposa county, 0*1. 

Notice.— There are delinquent upon the following 
described stock, on account of assessment No. 1, levied 
on the 25th day of November, 1874, the severat amountB 
set opposite the names of the respective shareholders, 
as follows: 
Names. No. Certificate. No. Shares. Amount. 

Osrnell, Richard 74 

Carnell, Richard 87 

Camell, Richard 88 

Chabot, A 109 

Coulter, Mary Ann 2 

Coulter, Mary Ann 3 

Donovan, M. J 183 

liUia.FredN 187 

Finck , George 1 28 

Finck, George 133 

Gillau, James S 1(10 

Hickox.B.F 189 

Hickox.B.F 140 

Lamar, T. D. 3 134 

Lamar, T. P. S 135 

Lee.R.H 163 

McFadden, John 14 

McFadden, John 15 

McFadden, John IB 

M-cFaddon, John 20 

McFadden, John 23 

McFadden, John 27 

McFudden , John 25 

Quinn, John 4 

Riley, H.K 181 

Rosekrans, H 160 

Shelden, Mark 159 

Stewart, John 130 

Stewart, John.... 131 

Taylor.D.W 124 

Taylor.D.W 126 

Taylor, D. W 120 

Tripp, J. W 141 

Tripp, J. W ...142 

Tripp, J. W 144 

Tripp, J. W 145 

Tripp, J. W 146 

Turuock, Joseph 136 

Wain wright, Wm 166 

Whalen, John 41 

Whalen, John 48 

Wbalen, John 61 

And in accordance with law, and an order 01 the 
Board of Directors, made on the 25th day of Nov- 
ember, 1874, so mauy shares of each parcel of said 
Btock as may be necessary, will be Bold at public auc- 
tion at the office of the Company, 408 California street, 
Room No. 16, on Friday, the 16th day of January, 1876, 
at the hour of 12 o'clock, m., of said day, to pay 
delinquent Assessments thereon, together with costB 

of advertising and expenses of sale. 

B. F. SlCKOX, Secretary. 
OfQce, Roo» 16, 408 California street, San Francisco, 
Cal. 



100 


J60 


60 


26 


60 


25 


1000 


600 


100 


50 


100 


50 


600 


250 


100 


50 


300 


150 


200 


luo 


1000 


510 


26 


12.60 


25 


12.60 


100 


60 


100 


60 


100 


6) 


100 


60 


100 


50 


100 


50 


60 


25 


60 


25 


50 


25 


50 


25 


200 


100 


60 


25 


260 


126 


1000 


500 


100 


50 


ino 


50 


500 


250 


1000 


600 


1000 


600 


60 


25 


50 


25 


25 


12.60 


25 


12.50 


25 


12.60 


60 


25 


255 


127.60 


100 


50 


100 


60 


60 


25 



14 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



[January 2, 1875, 



Ifoji and fllachipe tofe 

San Francisco Boiler Works, 

123 and 125 Beale Street SAN FRANCISCO 

~E>. I. CITBRY, 
Late Foreman of the Vulcan Iron v7orka,) Proprietor 




High and Low Pressure Boilers of all 
Descriptions. 

SOLE MANUFACTURERS OF THE CELEBRATED 
SPIRAL BOILER. 

SHEET IRON WORK of every description done- 
at the Shortest Notice. 

All kinds of JOBBING and REPAIRING- promptly 
attended to. 17y25-3m 



THE BISDON 

Iron and Locomotive Works, 

INCORPORATED APRIL 30, 1868. 

CAPITAL .' $1,000,000. 

LOCATION OF WORKS: 
Corner of Beale and Howard Streets, 

SAN FRAKCI5CO. 

Manufacturers of Steam Engines, Quartz and Flour 
Mill Machinery, Steam Boilers (Marine, Locomotive 
and Stationary), Marine Engines (High and Low Pres- 
sure) . AU kinds of light and heavy OaBtings at lowest 
prices. Cams and Tappets, with chilled faces, guaran- 
teed 40 per cent, more durable than ordinary iron. 
Directors : 



Joseph Moore, 
Wm. N orris, 



Jesse Holladay, 0/ E. McLane, 

Wm. H. Taylor, J. B. Haggin, 

James D. Walker. 



WM.H. TAYLOR President 

JOSEPH MOORE... Vice-President and Superintendent 

LEWIS R. MEAD: Secretary 1 

24vl7-qr . 



FULTON 

Foundry and Iron Works. 

HINCKLEY & CO., 

MAHUrACTUEKlia Of 

S T I«3 A. M ENGINES, 
Quartz, Flou.r and ©aw MiUg, 

JX&yes' Improved Steam Fnmp, Brodlc's Im- 
proved Crasher* Allulusr Pnmpi, 
Amalgamator!, and all kinds 
of Machinery. 

N. E. corner of Tehama and Fromont Btreets, above How* 
street , San Francisco. 3-qy 



PACIFIC 

Rolling Mill Company, 

SAN FRANCISCO, OaL. 
Eatablishfld for the Manufacture of 

RAILROAD AND OTHER IRON 

- — AlfB — 

Every "Variety of Shafting-, 

Embracing ALL SIZES f 
Steamboat Shaft «, Cranks, Platon and Con* 
_, nectlng Sods, Car and Locomotive Axles 
and Frames 

— ALSO — 

HAMMERED IRON 

Of every description and size 

a*- Orders addressed to PACIFIC ROLLING MILL 
COMPANY, P. O. box 2032, San Franoisco, Oal., will re- 
ceive prompt attention. 

ney- The highest price paid for Scrap Iron. 

SHEET IRON PIPE.- 



Risdon Iron and Locomotive Works 

Corner Howard and Beale Streets, 

Are prepared to make SHEET EBON AND ABPHALTUM 
PIPE, of any size and for any pressure, and contract to 
lay the same -where wanted, guaranteeing a perfect 
working pipe with the least amount of material. 

Standard sizes of railroad Oar Wheels, with special 
patterns for Mining Care . These small wheels are made 
of the best Oar Wheel Iron, properly chilled, and can be 
fitted up with the improved axle and box — introduced by 
this company, and guaranteed to outlast any other 
wheels made in this State. 

NT" All kinds of Machinery made and repaired. 



24v22-3m 



JOSEPH MOORE, Superintendent. 



The Phelps' Manufacturing Co., 

(Late S. F. Screw Bolt "Works. 

MA.NTJFACTTTREIt3 OF AXL KINDS OP 

Machine Bolts, Bridge Bolts, and Ship or 
Band Bolts. 

13, 15 and 17 Drumm Street, San Francisco. 4v241y 




PARKE & LACY, 



SOLE AQENTS FOR THE 



Burleigh Kock Drill Comuany. 



-iHANTJFACTUBERB OF- 



PNEUMATIC DRILLING MACHINES, 

AIR COMPRESSORS AND OTHER MACHINERY. 



Also, Farmers' Dynamic Electric Machine and 

Hill's Exploders for [Blasting-, Putnam Ha- 

tchine Company's Tools, Wright's Steam 

Pumps and Haskin's Engines. 

Address 



21v28-Sm-hd 



IVcURKE «fc DL1A.OY, 

310 California St., S. F. 



►3 O 



£8 






s aa 



i¥'p 



5n (Ens » E, & to 

" S S*S5 5.gg eats 

Ppag ^S'B BOPS' 1 

'Sssf'Siss 



•11 



g.8 gw'g "„.- t 

&iF :£ffef-: 



'flS 



pi 

H-.OO 

pj •< << 

&D 5' 
J" O (D 

: p 3' 
: a a 
■ && 



^g,. H 



HOOHOIUII 



HtSM*. 
I I I OH 

HMHOv 



r— WC£*-- 



uocn t; 



tO^-OlbB 



- if« m w tD ■ -3 -^ (O zn «© if 



bO X- t-i . |-i -,K l-i (-• I— '-' 

i ojooce ooojk to- rooooowoa 



w 

H 
O 

a 

> 

g. H 
• ia! 

w g 

M M 



hi g 

> s 

2 ob 

O H 



OCCIDENTAL FOUNDRY, 

187 and 139 First street SAN FRANCISCO. 

STEIGEE & BOLAND, 

IRON FOTJNDEBiS. 

IRON CASTINGS of all descriptions at short notice. 

Sole manufacturers of the Hepburn Rolling* Pan 
and Callahan Grate Bars, suitable for Burning 
Screenings. 

Notice.— Particular attention paid to making Supe- 
rior Shoes and Dies. 20v26.8m 



California Machine Works, 

119 BEALE STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 
BIRCH, ARGALL & CO., 

Builders of QUARTZ, SAW AND FLOUR MILLS 
Keating-'s Sack Printing Presses, 

The Economt Htdeaulic Hoist fob Stones, 

And General Machinists. 26v28-3m 



Vallejo Foundry and Machine Works, 

VALLEJO, OAL. 

JOHN L. HEAIiB, Proprietor. 

Manufacturer of Flour and Saw Mills, ' Stationary 
aud Portable Steam Engines, Pumps, etc. Boilers 
built and repaired, aud all kinds of Iron and Brass 
Castings furnished at Bhort notice. 



McAFEE, SPIERS & CO., 

BOILEB M A K K R S 

AND GENERAL MACHINISTS, 

Howard St., between Fremont and Beale, San Francisco 

Miners' Foundry and Machine Works, 

CO-OPERATIVE, 

First Street, bet. Howard and Folsom, San Francisco 

ulachinerv and Castincrs of all hinds. 



BAILEY'S PATENT ADJUSTABLE PLANES. 

THIRTY DIFFERENT STYLES. 

Smooth, Jack, Fore, Jointer, Block and Circular Planes. 

MANUFACTURED OF BOTH 

I It O IV A. N I> WOOD. 
OVER, 

80,000 

Already Sold. 

IHllH 

MANUFACTURERS: ^lllllllllllllll[l| ||l|l|l||||||||[| li'f'.i j ',! ijjj !?;!; ;.i||(!j||J|i| 

STANLEY" RULE AND LEVEL COMPANY. 
Factories: New Britain, Conn. Warerooms: 35 Chambers Street, New York. 





FOR SALE BY AXL HARDWARE DEALERS. 
B£F" Send f or descriptive Circulars, embracing a full assortment of Improved Tools. 



21v28-lt:m-ly 



UNION IRON WORKS, 

Sacramento. 

ROOT, NEILSON & CO., 

HAHUrAOTDBSRS OT 

8TEAM XHVGXCTGS, DBOHjEIWS, 



Dunbar'sPatentSelf-Adj \isting Steam Piston 

PACKING, for new and old Cylinders. 

And all kinds of Mining machinery. 

Front Street, between AT and O stroAts, 

Saobamento Oity. 



6. W. PHESCOTT. | W. R. EOBABT. 

Marysville Foundry, 

MARYSVILLE, -- OAL. 

PRESCOTT & ECKAHT, 
Manufacturers of Quartz and Amalgamating Machinery. 
Hoisiing Machinery, Saw and Grist Mill Irons, House 
Fronts, Oar Wheels, and Castings of every de- 
scription made to order. 
Steam Engines constantly on hand for sale. 9v28-Iy 



CALIFORNIA BRASS FOUNDRY, 

No. 185 First street, opposite Minna, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 

All Kiiroa of Brass, Composition. Zinc, and Babbitt Meta 
Castings, Brass Ship Work of all ktndtf, Spikes, Sheathing 
Nails, Rudder Braces, Hinges, SHip an d Steamboat Belleanu 
Gongsof superiortone. AU kindsof Cocks and Valves, Hy 
draullc Pipes and Nozzles, and Hose Couplings and Connec- 
tions of all sizes and patterns, furnished with dispatch 
«- PRICES MODERATE, -ff* 
.r. H. WFRH. V. KINOWELL. 



TSEODOKE KALLENBERG. 

and Maker of Models for Inventors. All kinds of Dies 

Stamps and Punches made. Also, all kinds of 

Small Gears Cut. 

Repairing done on very Reasonable Terms and in the 

best manner. No. 32 Fremont street, S. F. 19v23-3m 



THOMPSON BROTHERS, 
JGXJUEItA. FOUXDEY, 



L.I6IIT AUD HEA7T CASTINGS, 

of every description, manufactured. 2avl6ar 



^teapi kyi$. 




PARKE 

& 
LACY, 

Sole Agents for 
WRIGHT'S 

BUCKET- 
PLUNGER 

Steam Pump 

ALWAYS 
RELIABLE 

29vl9-tf 



THE SELiDEN 

DIRECT-ACTING STEAM PUMP, 

A. CARR, Manufacturer & Proprietor. 

Patented 




Combining simplicity and durability to a remarkable 
degree. Its parts are easy of accesB, and it is adapted, to 
all purposes for which Steam Pumps are used. 

As a Mining Pump it is Unsurpassed. 



STEAM, GAS & WATER PIPE, BRASS WORK STEAM 
& WATER GAUGES, FITTINGS, ETC. 

CARR PATENT STEAM RADIATOR. 

Send for Price List and Circulars. Address, 

A.. C ARR, 
10v28-ly 



43 Courtland Street , New York 



Diamond Drill Co. 

The undersigned, owners of LESOHOT'S PATENT 
for DIAMOND. POINTED DRILLS, now brought to the 
highest state of perfection, are prepared to fill orders 
for the IMPROVED PROSPECTING and TUNNELING 
DRILLS, with or without power, at short notice, and 
at reduced prices. Abundant testimony furnished of 
the great economy and successful working of numerous 
machines In operation in the quartz and gravel mines- 
on this coast. Circulars forwarded, aud full informa- 
tion given upon application. 

A. J. SEVERANCE & CO. 

Office, No. 315 California street, Rooms 16 and 17. 
2iv26-tf 



January 2, 1875.] 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



15 



California Planers and Matchers, and Wood Working Machinery of all Kinds, 

For Sale at TREADWELL & Co- Machinery Depot, San Francisco. 




HJWOBMtM PUVU AMI MaTVHEB is got- 
ten up froiu new patterns ipecliUy for this 
Coa»t. It hat Out Steel Blotted (blinder Bead, 
running Id patciu »*'lf oiling boxes; Matcher 
Bplndles also onfce beat rant steel. 
are sll prou-rttti *itb iron coron. Will plane 
24 in. wide and 6 Id. thick, and tongue ami 

it tn, wiiif. Will niak'- nutte 
ami stick gutt' m. or heavy roavllttngO, otc„ and 
U tbo ban Job Ma- Mm- star built. 

•/"Wf bavi- always uii band a large assort- 
ment of Planing Mill Kaoulrary, all of the latest 
Improvement*, Inolnding Elanara, Moulding, 
Uortlclogand Tanonlng Uaenlnt §, Hand and Jig 
Saws, kc. t Ac. Svnd fur Catalogues ami prices. 

TBEADWELL & CO., 

23vl9 eow-tf San Francisco. 



Adjustable Saw Gua»e 
Foot Power 




lmpruv^a fciaw Arbors. 



2¥X3 frX -%• 



fl_JL_fl_JLJl_Jl 



Improved Band Saws. 



Planer Knives of all sizes on hand- 




^ipijig Machinery. 



T 11 r: 

AMERICAN TURBINE WATER WHEEL 




KNOWLES' PATENT STEAM PUMP. 



K- cently improved andj submitted to thorough scien- 
tiQc teats by Junius Emerson, shewing the following 
nsoful effect of the power of the water utilized, being 

THE HIGHEST RESULTS EVER KNOWN. 

Percentage of part gate, H 50.08; )$ 09. 64; H 7R.73 
\ B2.68; ?i 8'J.OO. Percentage of whole gute, 83.14. 
Mr. Etnerson says: " These are the best aver- 
age results ever given by any Turbine Wheel 
in my experience" 

A splendidly illustrated descriptive catalogue, or any 
further information desired, furnish od on application to 

TREADWELL & CO., 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
Sole Agents for tho Pacific States and Territories. 
18v29-eow-tf 



EAGLE IMPROVED CHLORINIZING AND 
DESULPHURIZING FURNACE. 

(Patented July, 1873.) 




Tlie Cheapest and Most effective Furnace now in use 
Parties desirous of building above furnace, or for any 
information on same, address, 

I. T. MTLLIKEN, 
■ aSl No. 302 Montgomery St., room No. 1-1. 8. F. 



CROCKER'S PATENT 

TRIP HAMMER QUARTZ BATTERY. 




This machine, complete, weighs 1,500 Iub. Haa an iron 
rame, five -tool arms with stumps weighing 17 lbs. each, 
which strike '2,0t0 blows per minute, in a mortar provided 
with screens on both bhIcb. and crushes fine 600 lbs. per 
hour, requiring one-horse power to drive it. Has been 
thoroughly tested, and is guaranteed to give go ,d satis- 
faction. PRICE, $6U0. 

Gr. D. CROCKER, 
17v26-tf 315 California street, San Francisco, 




JSiCULC 



It has no CraDltR or Fly- Wheel, and has no dead points where It will stop, consequently it is always ready to 
start without using a starting-bar, and does not require hand-work to get it paBt the center. Will always start 
when the steam cylinder is filled with cold water of condensation. 

CENTRAL PACIFIC R. R., OFFICE OF THE GEN'L MASTER MECHANIC, J 
SACEAMENTO Oal., Januarv 14, 1873. J 

A. L. FISH, Esq., Agent of the Knowles Steam Pump-Dear Sir: In reply to your inquiry as to the merits of the 
Knowlea Steam Pump, in use upon this road, I will say that It gives me great pleasure tn report that they have per- 
formed their work well whenever called upon. In no instance have they tailed. We have now over 30 of them in 
iibo on this road as fire engines, and pumping water for shop and station use. I consider the Knowles Steam Pump the 
best in use, and prcier it to any other. Yonrs, truly, A. J.STEVENS, General .Master Mechanic. 

A. L. FISH, Agent Knowles' Steam Pump — Dear Sir: In answer to your inquiries, we state that the hiprhestaward 
for Steam Pumps at the Eighth or la-t Mechanics' F>iirin San Francisco, was a First Premium and Diploma, awarded 
to Knuwles' Patent Steam Pump, as published in the Official List September 23d. 1871. 

A. S. HALLiDIE, President Board of Manager-*. 

W. H. Williams, Sec'y Board of Managers Eighth Industrial Exhibition, M. 1. 



World, 



WE BUILD AND HAVE CONSTANTLY ON HAND 

The Largest Stock of Pumps in the 

And for Every Conceivable Purpose. 

SOBE AGENT ON THE PACIFIC COAST FOR THE 

CLAPP & JONES SUPERIOR STEAM FIRE ENGINE, 

01»;tlleiiiriifi££- the World ! 

THE CELEBRATED BOOMER. PRESS, 

For Wine, Cider, Lard, Paper, Wool, Hops, Hides, Tobacco, Bags, etc.— the Most Powerful 

in Uee, 



A. L. Fish, Agent, 

Nos. 5> and 11 First Street, Man Francisco, Cal. 



P. S.— All kinds of new and second-hand Machines on hand. 



4v29-lam-bp-3m 



Improved Cast and Forged Steel Shoes and Dies for Quartz Mills. 

[PATENTED MAT 2GTH, 1874.] 
Price Reduced to 16 Cents Per Pound. 
San Fbanoisco, November 10th, 1871. 

To Supts. of Quarts Mills and Mining Men generally; 
We take pleasure in stating that owing to the rapid 

increase in our orders, our Pittsburg Manufacturers 

have been compelled to add largely to their works — 

a new gas furnace and heavier trip hammer — and are 

thus enabled to reduce. the cost of tteel and at the 

same timo produce Shoes and Dies superior to any yet 

manufactured. We have consequently reduced the 

price to 16' cents per pound and solicit a trial order, 

guaranteeing that you will find them at least 10 per 

cent- cheaper than the best iroD. There are no Steel 

Shoes and Dies made excepting under our patent and 

Bold at this office, or by our authorized agents, though 

certain Eastern manufacturers advertise Steel Shoes 

and Dies which are only cast iron hardened by the 

addition of a composition. They will not out-wear two 
sets of common iron, though called steel. They are 
very brittle and are not capable of beiog tempered, 
flying from under the hammer like cast iron. Our 
Steel Shoes and Ddss are in in-e in many of the largest 
mills on the Pacific Coast, and all who have tried them 
pronounce them cheaper and far superior to iron in 
every respect, even at the old price of 20 cents per 
pound. Their advantages over iron are cheapness on first 
cost, increased crushing capacity, time saved in chang- 
ing and in setting tappets, increased value of amalgam 
by absence of iron dust and chippings, and a Baving of 
75 per cent, in freight. It takes 60 days to fill orders 
from the manufactory East. Price 16 cents per 
pound shipped at San Francisco. Terms liberal. 
Address all orders, -with dimensions, to 
lv29-3m CAST STEEL SHOE & DIE CO., Room 1, Academy Building, S. F 






TEATS' PATENT FURNACE 

For Roasting, Desulphurizing. Chloridizing 
and Oxidizing Ores, etc. For the reduction of 
Gold, Silver, Lead and other ores, saving a larger per- 
centage, at less cost, than any other invention now in 
ubh. Qhloridizing Silver ore more thoroughly, in less 
time, with less fuel, salt and labor; also roasting Lead 
ore preparatory to smelting, better and cheaper than 
any other invention. The Furnace is so constructed 
that one man, of ordinary ability, tends five or more 
furnaceB; controls them with eaBe; adding heat or air; 
stopping or Btartingat will; charging and discharging 
with ease. Also, Patent 'Convoying Cooler," for con- 
veying and cooling roasted ores, heating the water for 
amalgamation and the boilers at the same time. Saving 
the large Bpace in mill (covered with brick or iron), 
and the labor of two men per day, exposed to the pois- 
onous chlorine gaseB. Also, Patent Air Blast "Dry 
Kiln," for drying ores direct from the mine or breaker, 
saving fuel and labor heretofore necessary in drying 
ores for dry pulverizing. For description refer to 
Mining and Scientific Press, No. 18, October 31, 1874. 
For particulars addreBS 

TEATS & BREED, 

No. 12 West Eighth Street, Cincinnati, Ohio 

Circulars, &c, will be furnished, if required. 
18v29-3m 



STEEL SHOES AND DIES 

FOR, QTJAR'JTZ M1LL8, 

Made by our improved pro- 
cess. After many years of 
patient research and experiment 
we have succeeded In producing 
STEEL SHOES AND DIES for 

QUARTZ 
MILLS, 

which are I 

unequalled | 

for 




Economy 




l>le. 



fc. hoe, 

Will wear three times longer than any iron Shoes 
BUILDERS AND CONTRACTORS 

Of Quartz Mills, Pans, Separators, Concentrators, Jigs, 
Hydraulic Rock Breakers, Furnaces, EngineB, Boilers 
and Shafting, and general Mining Machinery in all its 
details and furnishers of Mining Supplies. 
All orders proniply filled. 

MOREY & SPERRY, 

88 Liberty street, N. Y. 
Examination solicited. 9v28-ly 



Stamp Mill For Sale at Ophir Canon, 

Nye County, Nevada. Midway between Austin and 
Belmont, belonging to the Twin River Consolidated 
Mining Co. A complete mill, comprising twenty (20) 
8001b stamps, (dry-crushing) with Rock Breaker, Puns, 
Settlers, and entire outfit of milling appliances; 
together with an excellent engine (18x42) , two tubular 
boilers and all requisite shafting, gearing, belting, &c; 
a valuable lot of Sierra Nevada timber in Battery 
frames and building. The whole is offered cheap. For 
further information apply to JAS. D. HAGUE, 
18v27-3in 240 Montgomery St., S. F 

WONPAREXL OJJL. 

140 Degrees Fire Test, for Family Use. 

OWNERS OF MILLS AND MANUFACTORIES, your 
attention is particularly called to this beautiful and 
safe Illuminating Oil. Its use iB urgently recom- 
mended by the New York Fire Commissioners and In- 
surance Companies. For sale to the trade in lots to 
suit. A. HATWARD, 224 California St, ' 

19v28-3m 



26 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



[January 2, 1875. 








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f;Iillp:l^iPlli^!IiHTHE "HOADLEY" PORTABLE STEAM ENGINE 

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The above cut?, represent the new style "HO AD LEY" variable cutoff 15 Horse-Power Portable Engine. We have same style and fizo mounted on 
wheels as a Threshing Engine for the Kutsell End-shake Separator. We have all sizes from 3 to 40 horse-power on hand. T*he HOADLEY ENGINES need 
no recommendation from us. We have sold them in California for 20 years, and every year has added to their improvements. The lust great improve- 
ment is the Cut-off Governor, thus giving them all the economy and inci-eaBed power qf the most thorough built stationary engine. 

83~Millmen, Mine-owners aud Mining Superintendents, and all who intend buying engines, will do well to examine carefully the merits of the 
"HOADLEY" before purchasing. Circulars and prices Bent free on appplication. Address 

TREADWELL & CO., San Francisco. 



Randol and Wright's Quicksilver Purifying Apparatus. 

For Description Bee Mining and Scientific Press, November 7th, 1874. 




Patented November 25th, 1873. 

RANDOL AND FIEDLER'S QUICKSILVER CONDENSERS, 

MADE OP 'WOOD AND GLASS. 

Patented July 28th, 1874. See Mining and Scientific Press, September lflth, 1874. 

FITEDLEIfc'SSS QUICKSILVER CONDENSERS, 

MADE OF IRON. 

Patented February 24th, 1874. See Mining and Scientific Press, November 15th) 1873. 
For plans and rights to use, address 
2lT29-16p-eow-3m F , piEDDER, New Almaden, Cal 



W. T. G-ARRATT. 
C XT Y 

Brass and Bell Founder, 

Corner Natoma and Fremont Streets, 
manufacturers of 

Brass, Zinc and Anti-Friction or Babbet Meta 

CASTINGS, 

Church and Steamboat Bells, 

T.WERN AND L.1JID B£LLS, GONU8, 

FIRE ENGINES, FORCE AND LIFT PUMPS. 

Steam, Liquor, Soda, Oil, Water and Flange Cocks, 
and Valves of all descriptions, made and repaired. 
Hose and all other Joints, Spelter, Solder and Cop- 
per Rivets, etc. Gauge Cocks, Cylinder Cocks, Oil 
GUobeB, Steam Whistles. HYDRAULIC PIPES AND 
NOZZLES lor mining purposes. Iron Steam Pipe fur- 
nished with Fittings, etc. Coupling Joints of all sizes. 
Particular attention paid to Distillery Work. Manufac- 
turer of " Garratt's Patent Improved Journal Metal." 

•=7~HigheBt Market Price paid for OLD BELLS, COP- 
PER and BRASS. 0-tt' 



CazirTs Combination Ore-Sizer and Con- 
centrator — One Plunger System. 

[Covered by Letters Patent of July 2d, 1872, and recent 
applications.] 

Containing a sizing apparatus, (revolving screen) de- 
livering two or low sizes of ore to two or four rows of 
sieves, each row independent of the other, and each 
havinG 6 sieves, each row concentrating according to 
specific gravity the special size automatically fed unto 
it, resulting in the sinrultaneous continual delivery of 
separated materials, working 2d and 3d-olasb oreBinto 
let-claes ores of perfect cleanness. It thoroughly sep- 
arates native gold or copper from quartz or any other 
lode matter; — galena and silver sulphurets from 
pyrites, baryta and quartz; and pyrites from quartz. 

Added to a battery of stamps these machines consti- 
tute a full system of ore concentration, sufficient in 
niOBt capes for the requirements of western hiineB, with 
a capacity of IS or 20 tons per 24 hours . 

For particulars apply to, 

P. CAZIN, M. & C. E. 

Supt. Denver Concentration and Smelting Co. 
At Denver, Colorado, Lock-Box 2225, .or corner of 
Blake and 32d itreets. ■ ag8-16p 



Thursday Noon our laBt forms go to press. Com- 
munications should be received a week in advance and 
advertisements as early in the week as possible. 



GIANT P0WDEE. 

Patented May OB, 1808. 

THE ONLY SAFE BLASTING POWDER IN USE. 

GIANT POWDER, NO. 1, 

For hard and wet Rock, Iron, Copper, etc., and Submarine Blasting. 

GIANT POWDER., NO. a, 

For medium and seamy Rock, Lime, Marble, Sulphur, Coal, Pipe Clay and GraVel Bank Blasting, Wood, etc. 
Its EXCLUSIVE uBe saves from 30 to 60 per cent, in e»penseB, besides doing the work in half the time 
required for black powder. 

1&~ The only Blasting Powder used in Europe and the Eastern States. 

BANDMANN, NIELSEN & CO., 
v22-3mlGp General Agents, No. 210 Front Street. 



THE PACIFIC 

REDUCTION WORKS, 



GUIDO KUSTEL, 



Superintendent. 



WILI. PURCHASE GOLD AND SILVER JBEARIN& ORES, CUPERIPEROTTS SILVER 

ORES, GOLD STTLPHTTRETS, ETC., AT THE HIGHEST RATES, OR WORK 

THE SAME. FOR ACCOUNT OP OWNERS. 

Office, SIO Front Street, San Francisco. 

4V29-6m-16p 



1874. A GRAND SILVER MEDAL. 1874. 




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The highest and only prize of its claws given to any 
Vertical Engine wsb awarded to the 

HASKINS ENGINES AND BOILERS, 

BY THE 

MASS. CHARITABLE MECHANICS' ASSOCIATION, 
at their Fair in Eo3ton, in competition with the 

Baxter, New York Safety Steam Power 
and the Sharpley Engines. 



MAGAZINES . 



Harper's 

Atlantic....! 

Godey 

New York Ledger.. ■ . 

Blackwood 

Hours at Home 

Good Words 

Peterson 3 

Arthur 

Lady eFriend 

Harper's Weekly.... 

Ohironey Corner 

Literary Album. . .. 
!.»'■> mlon Society. 
All the Year Round ■ 
London 111. News — 



3 00 

5 00 

6 00 



W. E. L00MIS* 
News Dealer 

AND STATIONER, 

3. E. corner of Sansome r.tid 

Washington Btreets, 

supplies ALL 

Eastern Perodicals 

BY THE 

Tear, Month, or Nmnb 



N. W. SPAULDING, 

Saw Smithing and Repairing 

ESTABLISHMENT. 

Nos. 17 and 19 Fremont Street, near Market. 




MANTJFAOTUBER OF 



SPAULDING'8 

Patent Tooth Circular Saws. 

They have proved to be the most dn able and economi- 
cal Saws in the Wot.d. 

Each Saw is "Warranted in every respect; 

Particular, attention paid to construction of 

Portable & Stationary Saw Mills. 

MILLS FURNISHED AT SHORT KOTIOK 
At the lowest Market PrlceB. 



New inventions t 

Of real merit, If brought plainly before the pnbllc 
when fresh, are most likely to become profitable to the 
patentee. For this reason, patentees (of worthy de- 
vices) should bave the best of EngravlngB Made, and 
published In the Pbess. Superior Engravings Made, 
at reasonable rates, by artists In this office bp-tf 




JJV DKWKY A. OO. 

i *ji i .-Hi Solicitor*. 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY. JANUARY 9, 1875. 



VOLUME XAX 

Number !8. 



Eastern Investors in Mines. 

We received a letter this week from some 
people in .i town in Iudi ma, of which the fol- 
lowing is an extract: "We would like to have 
a map uf the \Vm*hoe or C imstock lode; also a 
book or whatever is published that would en- 
lighten a straoger on the ureat resources of 
wealth in that region. Now whatever you 
know to be of interest to young speculators in 
said mining districts please m< ntion by mail or 
through your journal, so we will be able to pur- 
chase." 

Probably the best thing to enlighten a stran- 
ger of the great resources of wealth of that re- 
gion would bo to go there and see it, or else 
come to the mint and look at a few cords of 
silver bricks. There is a great deal published 
which might enlighten them about the mines, 
but not much to enlighten them about how, 
and when, and where to invest so as to make 
money. There is considerable to tell young 
speculators about the Gomstock, but as the ad- 
vice they want probably relates to a stock that 
is very low an 1 will surely go up very high 
after they buy into it, the question is difficult 
to answer, more particularly as no stock is very 
low just at present. The map wouldn't be of 
the slightest use in informing them about what 
they want. 

Evidently our stock excitement has had time 
to travel across the continent, and is making 
some of those E intern folks dream about large 
profits with little capital and no risk. But to 
those who are thinking of coming here to make 
money out of mines by investing in s'ocka, our 
advice is to remain at home. If they have made 
up their minds to mine, the only way to do is 
to couie here and buy one of the many thou- 
sand mines awaiting capital for development. 
There are plenty of them which can be bought 
cheap. But if the intended immigrants have 
only a few hundred dollars, and expect to make 
a fortune out of it, they stand more chances to 
lose what they have than to get richer, by in- 
vesting haphazard in stocks. 

Mining is a business just like anything else. 
Anybody may stumble on a bunch of croppings 
and strike a ledge, but to make money out of 
it afterward is another thing. Dealing in stocks 
is also a business, and requires much more 
shrewdness to be successful than many sup- 
pose. Because a man can run a plane, a lathe, 
or any other tool, it does not follow that he can 
jump at once into another man's business, and 
do as wtll as he. It needs capital to go into 
stooks like anything else, but a man's profits 
are not always proportionate to his capital. 

We on this coast who know anything about 
mining are often provoked to laugh at the crude 
ideas entertained by our Atlantic brethren on 
the subject of mines. They hear about a man 
having struck a ledge which assays $10,000 a 
ton. Straightway they calculate that a ton 
could almost fill a dumpcart, and for every 
dumpcart full they would get $10,000. And as 
the ledge is three feet wide, and they can get 
out at least 50 tons a day, there is $500,000 a 
day. When they figure up the yield for the 
first 30 days it gives them about $15,000,000 on 
the $lO,0U0 per ton basiB, about which time 
they begin to get excited on the subject. We 
all know what absurdity there is in figuring on 
$10,0U0per ton assays, or even $1,000 per ton 
assays, and what they amount to, but those 
Eastern people hearing of onr Sharons and 
Jones, et. al., think a thousand a ton isn't so 
much after all. 

About mining stocks they have still cruder 
ideas, imagining that all a man has to do is to 
put a few hundred dollars into abroker's hands, 
and in a few days it comes out thousands in- 
stead of hundreds. This is all very well in a 
few cases, but is not by any means the rule. 
The mining stock men here are quite as sharp 
in their peculiar business as the Wall street men 
in theirs, and Eastern speculators would prob- 
ably do as badly here as our speculators would 
there. No sensible man would advise people to 
come here from the East to make their fortunes 
in stocks. There are plenty of us Californians 
who havn't made our fortune yet, and we want 
our turn first. 



Hydraulic Mining in California. 

Wo. T. 

Connection Between Tumel and Surface. 

The first opening of a hydraulic mine, as we 
have seen, is rather a tedious and expensive 
business; however, after a connection is once 
made between tunnel and surface, other nec- 
essary improvements are easily accomplished. 
For instnnce, the chimney represented as run- 
ning up on a slope may be, if only short, 
changed into a vertical shaft, or, if long, into 
terraces, bo that the gravel rushing down may 
be submitted to a crushing process, which a fall 
of 20 feet or more will create. 

Where the bed rock between terminus of 
tunnel and basin is of considerable depth, a 



very strong blow. The benefit of a drop of 
even a few feet on the line of sluice boxes is 
well known to the miner, and a repetition of 
Buch drops must necessarily cause the repeti- 
tion of such benefits, which consists in the 
crushing, stirring up, changing of position of 
the "pnlp," and the consequent liberation and 
percipitation of the gold. 

By the time the tunnel is reached the force 
of the several falls or drops is broken, and a 
leap of 30 inches lodges the ruuniug masj in 
the sluice boxes. 

Condensed from an article by Charlee Waldeyer, of 
the last Annual Report of the U. S. Commissioner of 
Mining Statistics. 

A Course of Scientific Lectures.— The 
Trustees of the MechaLics' Institute and the 
Uuiversityof California hive arranged for a 
course of twelve scientific 1 ctures to be deliv 
ered in this city. The first will be delivered 
Saturday evening by Dr. G. F. BecKer, on the 




PIG. 8. SLOPE CUT INTO 

system of terraces will be more advisable than 
a vertical shaft, for the reason not only that 
the sloping chimney is far more easily changed 
into terraces than into a vertical shaft, but 
also that the danger of blockading or choking 
is greatly lessened. 

The terraces ought to be constructed in such 
a way that the first fall is the deepest, each suc- 
cessive one lessening as the tunnel is approach- 
ed, so that the last fall is not more than a com- 
mon drop of two or three feet, such as may be 
found on a line of sluice boxes. 

The diagram given represents a slope of 100 
feet vertical hight, cut into terraces. 

FEET. 

The first fall represents 30 



The second 25 

The third 20 

The fourth 16 

The fifth 73S 

The sixth and last, into the boxes 2Jg 

Total 100 

Whether a vertical shaft or a slope — in other 
words, a single drop of 100 feet, or a succession 
of drops of the same aggregate depth, will be 
preferable, is a matter open to discussion. It 
seems that a succession of blows, of less force 
but striking the matter to be crushed from dif- 
ferent sides, must be more effective than one 



TERRACES. 

"Metallurgy of CommonMetals." One lecture 
will be delivered on each of the following met- 
als: Gold, silver, quicksilver, and steel. After 
these four are delivered, Prof. Charles E. 
BesBey, of the Iowa State Agricultural College, 
will commence a series of four lectures upon 
the "Useful Vegetable Products," and will be 
followed by Prof. Brewer, of Yale College, with 
a course of four lectures on coal, salt and oil. 
The lectures, like those heretofore delivered, 
will be free, but names must be enrolled with 
the Librarian of the Institute. 



The Hoosao. — The Eureka Sentinel is inform- 
ed that negotiations are pending in regard to 
the incorporation of the Hoosac Mining and 
Smelting company, to work the mine by that 
name, now the property of Harry Strout, of 
Eureka, who is now in San Francisco on busi- 
ness connected with such incorporation. The 
property has been developed under the super- 
vision of Mr. Strout; the machinery, both at 
the mine and furnace, is in splendid working 
order, and should such an incorporation be 
made the company need not expend any money 
in perfecting the works, but start imniediately 
on a working basis with a fine show of success 
from the start. 

An eight-inch vein of cinnabar was last week 
found in the bedrock in the Wolff placer mine 
on Canon creek, Trinity county. 



Academy of Sciences. 

The annual meeting of the California Acad- 
emy of Sciences waB held on Mouday evening 
last. No business was transacted exempt that 
of reviewing the annual reports of the tffiiers, 
and the results of the election which took place 
on the sime day. 

The report of the Vice-President summa- 
rized the more important events of the year. 
The Academy has flourished, and in its new 
quarters, the museum is fast becoming rich in 
collections. Five members were lost by death 
during the year; The first of these was H. G. 
Bloomer, curator, whose library ;ind botanical 
collection were purchased by thi Academy. 
Then occurred the deaths of CjI. LeanJer 
Ransom and Dr. Fjurgeaud, and news has ar- 
rived of the demise of two corresponding mem- 
bers, one of them, M. Qu-telet, and the other, 
Ferdinand Stolizcska, a distinguished paleon- 
tologist at Calcutta. Tne Recording Secretary, 
Mr. Charles G.'Yale, had performed his duties 
with unremitting faithfulness, and in view of 
the very large amount of copy.ng he his to 
perform, General Hewstou recommended tnat 
some assistance be obtained for the mechan- 
ical part of the work. Mr. Bloomer's successor, 
Mr. William G. Blunt, had worked very labor- 
iously since his appointment, in the arrange- 
ment of the museum and the library. There 
are now 20,000 specimens in the mineral 
department, princip dly of oreB from California, 
Nevada and Oregon. Many of them are du- 
plicates, and some effort should be made to 
exchange them for others. There are also 280 
species of fishes, and 100 of reptiles, besides 
birds and 200 different kinds of birds' eggs in 
the collection. The report concluded with a 
pleasant reference to the generous deeds of 
James Lick &nd the distinguished services of 
Prof. Davidson. 

Mr. R, C. Stearns presented a report on his 
labors as Corresponding Secretary. 

The report of Mr. Charles G. Yale, Record- 
ing Secretary, contained the following: Dur- 
ing the past year the average attendance at 
the meetings of the Academy has been 47 mem- 
bers, the highest having been 66 and the lowest 
30. Eighty-three resident members have joined 
during the year, 12 life members and four cor- 
responding members. Two of the resident 
members have become life members. Seven 
have resigned. Six have been dropped for 
non-payment of dues, and the total member- 
bership of the Academy now is 411. There 
are 316 resident, 75 life and 20 honorary mem- 
bers. Not only has there been an increase in 
the average attendance, but the number of 
papers read has been greater. During the year 
past there were 61 papers presented, moBt of 
which are published in the proceedings of the 
Academy. A list of these papers is given in 
the report. 

Mr. Brooks' report on the financial standing 
of the Academy showed that on the 1st of 
January last year, there was a balance on hand 
of $4,563.72. From monthly dues there was 
received $2,961; and from life memberships, 
$1,800. The total receipts were $10,946.47; 
and the expenditures, $7,988.04; leaving on 
hand, $2,958.43. 

Dr. Behr's report on the library stated that 
by the untiring labors of Mr. Blunt the volumes 
and papers have been neatly arranged in oases 
and protected from damp. There are 2,500 
bound volumes and the same number of un- 
bound. 

Mr. Stearns reported that the proceedings of 
the Academy for the year will make a volume 
extending to 424 pages. 

The officers elected for the ensuing year are 
as follows: President, George Davidson; First 
Vice-President, Henry Edwards; Second Vice- 
President, Henry Gibbons, Sr.; Recording 
Secretary, Charles G. Yale; Corresponding 
Secretary, Henry G. Hanks; Treasurer, Elisha 
Brooks; Librarian, Wm. J. Fisher; Director of 
Museum, Albert Kellogg; Trustees, David D. 
Colton, Geo. E.'Gray, R. E. C. Stearns, Thos. 
P. Madden, Jno. Hewston, Jr., R. C. Harrison, 
W. Ashburner. 



The property of the Tannehill Mining com- 
pany, at Eureka, has been sold to satisfy an 
execution. Selden Hentzel was the purohaser, 
paying $4,300. 



18 



MININ.G AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



[January g, 1875. 



CORRESPONDENCE. 



Arizona—The Dreary Desert Trip—The 
Quahate Mines. 

Not many years ago I listened to a glowing 
description of the then but little known mines 
in Arizona, by Christopher Carson (nephew of 
the celebrated "Kit"), who asserted that, the 
then hidden and undeveloped treasures that 
would be found would far surpass the famed 
Comstock lode. Mr. Carson (who since thart 
time was billed in a quarrel at White Pine) I 
thought was entitled to great consideration in 
his views, as being an expert in the Indian lan- 
guage and travelling among the Apaches almost 
anywhere unmolested, of course his field of 
observation waB more extended than that of 
'any other person. Remembering his peculiar 
manner of predicting the future of Arizona, 
and noticing the quiet drift of emigration tend- 
ing that way for the last few years, and occa- 
sionally reading of some rich strike being 
made, my attention has been closely drawn to 
this southern country. So, being placed by an 
engagement to a large mining company, at this 
extreme southern town for an extended period, 
I shall note down from time to time tbe min- 
ing and other progress of this territory, for the 
columns ot the Scientific Pbess. 

At six o'clock on the morning of the eighth 
of December, Gov. Safford, Lieut. Loshe and 
myself left the Horton House, San Diego, en 
route for this place, the Capital of the Terri- 
tory. Our conveyance a Concord wagon, can- 
vas top, with two seats inside and tbe driver's 
outside ; drawn by four very good horses, and 
the redoubtable "Brown" for our drivtr. 
What Brown? 
Why, our Brown, of course, The pleasant, 
agreeable and noted driver, H. C. Brown — 
BtriotJy temperate, always ready with a song, 
and, as he says, a "hankering after bron- 
cos." We had a surplus of baggage aboard, 
the amount allowed to each passenger being 
only forty pounds— charges for all above that, 
sixty cents per pound — the fare being ninety 
dollars, all in greenbacks. At two o'clock we 
arrived at Kock Springs, 37 miles out, in 
Lower California — Mexico. Salt and alkali 
plains, with sagebrush and some mesquite. 
Here we had something to eat, changed horses 
and travelled on, through some very fair land, 
with fine running water, to 

Hill's Ranch. 
Travelled 33 miles more, and by 10 p. m. 
stopped a few miles from the summit of the 
coast range, got a good supper, chauged horses 
and drivers — exit Brown — and in 25 minutes 
on we go again. What a grand mistake I made 
about the weather. It is piercing cold. Gov, 
Safford laughs at Lieut. Loshe and myself 
for not bringing blankets, and said we were a 
"verdant pair, sure enough," and wondered 
"why we had brought our overcoats." We 
managed to buy a single blanket and a pair of 
woolen socks, and by wrapping our feet and 
legs in paper and barley sacks, worried through 
the night. At 7 a. m. arrived at 

Cayote Wells; 
30 miles more! Oh how cold and f!< epy. Sand 
dunes and rocky ribbed ledges in all directions. 
Get a poor breakfast, change horees and 
drivers, also wagons. One of the most peculiar 
ideas to me is, right here in the»midst of the 
desert where the heaviest pulling is to do, we 
are reduced to two horses. On we slowly go 
again, after an interval of 35 minutes at the 
worst substitute for a house I ever saw. Gov. 
and myself walked a few miles while Lieut. 
Loshe sleeps— desert everywhere, desolation 
supreme. Eighteen miles more brought us to 

Indian Wells 
at 3 p. m. Government telegraph station. 
Sand dunes piled upon each other in every 
direction seemed almost endless. Change 
horses, a few more miles and we are in Mexico 
again. At 6 p. m. we reach New river, 15 
miles farther. We partook of an awful bad 
meal, everybody cross and another cold 
a desert night btfore us. Seventy miles to 
"Yuma. At a quaiter to 11 p.m. we got to 
Gardiner's. Change horses, got four this time 
so as to make a good appearance going into 
town; awful dusty; get somo sleep, however; 
roads smooth. About eight o'clock we struck 
the Colorado river in Mexico and wiud along 
up its banks and we are soon back in the 
United States again. Castle Dome looms up 
;ome 50 miles away where I understand some 
mining is being done. Arrive at Fort Yuma 
nine o'clock. Fort and barracks with govern- 
ment houses situated on the hills of the west 
bank of the river. Cross on a very good ferry 
and roll up to the hotel on a brisk trot. One 
long wide street dotted with one story adobe 
houses comprise the town of 

Yuma City, Arizona. 
Population, about 600. Understand no mes- 
gages have been received lately from deceased 
soldiers for blankets. Thermometer in hotel 
standing at 58° at 10 a. m., calmed our surprise 
at the cessation of messages from Hades, not- 



withstanding several Indians were perambul- 
ating the town almost in nature's habiliments 
only. Get a good square meal and Lieut. 
Loshe draws on quartermaster for some of the 
good things of life. Procure new driver, new 
horses, four again to make a good show leaving 
town, and a small wagon or buckboavd with 
only two seats — they call it a jerk-water. Judge 
it is rightly named from the many times we 
were jumped upon our feet and bumped around 
promiscuously. Gov. Safford receives con- 
gratulations of friends. Get copies of Yuma 
Sentinel and at 10 o'clock trot out of town and 
take our course along up the Gila river. Arrive 
at Gila city, a place of one house and a corral. 
At 2-p. m.; 20 miles out from Yuma city, get 
another square meal annd roll along 24 miles 
more to 

Fillibuster, 
A stage station receiving its name from the 
Crabbe party who went down into Sonorasome 
years ago to revolutionize the government and 
made this their hist camping place before en- 
tering the State of Sonora, Mexico. Arrive at 
7 p. m. and get a very objectionable meal. 
Change horses and proceed on to Mohawk, 22 
miles; night air very uncomfortable, no sleep 
from the cold and rough bumping in our jerk- 
water. Arrive at 12 o'clock at night. Here we 
change horses and get a new driver, a wo"uld-be 
Congressman — just thiok of it! 

The Hon. Dave Beardsley, 
Late candidate for Congress from the Territory 
of Arizona, guide and director of our little two 
horse jerk-water en route for Tuscon. Our 
Bleepy heads were all awake with curiosi'y, 
and our wearied and cramped limbs straightened 
out, our bodies were erect with the dignity be- 
coming the occasion for a look at the Congres- 
sional features, and a shake hands with this 
wonderful prodigy of the road. "We were soon 
whirling along again after two of the sorriest 
"plugs" -we had hitched to as yet, but the mere 
idea on our imaginations of the gentleman who 
was our driver exalted the horses into fiery, 
prancing steeds, each one a Bucephalus. 
"Tired nature's sweet restorer" overcame us 
for awhile, and at 4 o'clock we halted at 
Teamsters' Camp for breakfast — 16 miles more 
of our wearisome journey over. The bright 
rays of the morning sun warmed us into life 
again, and we listened to Mr. B^ai-dsley on the 
late Congressional canvass.. He was an old 
friend of the Governor's, and the manner in 
which he described the part he took in the can- 
vass was amusing. 

"Governer, I warmed them up, didn't I, de 
ye see? You bet yer bottom dollar I'll make 
some of them hunt their holes next time by — 
de ye see? You can jest bet yer sweet life I'll 
go for them like a coyote!" Nine a. m. 
brought us to Stanwix station, the home of , 

King Wolsey 
The great "greaser" hunter and Indian fighter. 

There are some fine lands iu this portion of 
Arizona. The Gila bottoms are ricb, and a 
great deal of wheat and other cereals are an- 
nually produced. Burk's station at 12 a. si., 
dinner, change horses and move on; the road 
rocky and rough; cross some high mesas or 
table lands; some very high hills, and pass the 
grave of tho Oatmau family, which is in a very 
pretty valley. The grave is neatly fenced in 
and on a clean white board at the head of the 
grave we read, "Royse Oatman and family, 
murdered by the Tonto Apaches, April 19, 1851. 
Erected by Lieut. H. L. Williamson, Troop K, 
IstU. S.^calvary, 1871." The sad details of this 
affair have been published in all the newspa- 
pers of the Union. 

Pass the tollhouse in twelve miles more. 
For three or four miles from here the road 
runs under a rocky and precipitous bluff along 
the banks of the Gila, and considerable work is 
required each year to keep the way passable, 
so a certain toll is charged on all teams. On 
to Kenyon station, eight miles; arrive at half- 
past five; get a very fair meal; change 
horses and drivers; bid good bye to Mr. 
Beardsley and roll on to Gila Bend eighteen 
miles; arrive at 11 p. m. There we fiud the 
neatest adobe house we have come to so far, 
kept by a Mr. Decker. Awful cold; wrap up 
close and off we go for Maricopa "Wells, 45 
miles distant, across the worst desert we en- 
counter in Arizona, and which, by the way, I 
must say is a paradise compared to the Cali- 
fornia desert. I think Arizona has been Eome- 
what slandered, for over the road we have trav- 
eled in the Territory there has been no place 
but what some vegetation grew, and the inter- 
minable and desolate sand dunes of San Diego 
county, California, are almost forgotten in the 
relief we experience in traveling over the alkali 
plains of Arizona. 

On the verge of the desert on a high plateau 
stands the building or buildings of the noted 

Maricopa Wells, 
Consisting of a series of edifices all connected 
with each other — hotel, postofhce, telegraph of- 
fice, stage office, store, grocery, wagon and 
blacksmith shops, stables, corral, wagon .yard 
and other outbuildings, all of one story adobe 
and belonging to a Mr. Sloore, superintendent 
and part owner of the stage line, a very hos- 
pitable and pleasant gentleman, whose estim- 
able wife with her kind manners and cheering 
conversation made us feel perfectly at hom«, 
especially the Governor, who seems to be a 
favorite all along the route. After partaking of 
a hearty breakfast, we get a new team, driver 
and a large wagon, and in an hour from the time 
we stopped we are off on the road again with 
one additional passenger, Mr. George H.Tyng, 
U. S. MarBhalof Arizona. Through this gen- 
tleman I received some information about the 



Silver Quahate Mines. 

They lie 40 miles southeast of Maricopa Wells, 
in t&e Quahate mountains. On the Quahate 
claim they are down but a few feet, and have a 
three-foot vein of rich ore, which would all 
yield if worked right over $300 per ton. Their 
claim lies within the 300 foot limits of the Sac- 
aton, to which it runs nearly parallel,- the ore 
carrying a great deal of chloride. It is now 
being worked byarastras, yielding handsomely. 
The 

Sacaton Mine 
Has a shaft 12 by 12 down 64 feet in solid 
ore. True fissure vein 12 feet" wide; 1800 
pounds of ore yielded 394 ounces of silver by 
smelting; ores not base enough for easy smelt- 
ing, but too base for easy amalgamation. The 
mine is now worked by arastras, yielding over 
$200 per ton. It is twelve miles to wood and 
water. Besides these two mines there are sev- 
eral other locations which have been pretty 
well prospected, the assays running way up in 
the thousands. "We pass through the Pimo 
villages on the Gila, by theU. S. Indian agency 
buildings, on to the Sweetwater station 25 miles ; 
arrive at 4 p. m. and get dinner. Here we di- 
verge from the direct route, as the mail has to 
go by the way of Florence following the Gila, 
which makes our journey some 40 miles longer. 

"We pass through Sacaton and arrive at 
Florence 
At 11.P. ,m., over a very good road, 33 miles. 
The change into a much better country is very 
perceptible, the land since leaving Maricopa 
Wells growing richer with fine grasses. Flor- 
ence has as fine a fitted up store inside as any 
place outside of San Francisco, also fine run- 
ning streams and trees growing in all direc- 
tions. Change horses and drivers for the last 
time; get a very good supper; take on another 
passenger, which makes six on our wagon now, 
with no chance for sleep, and off we go on the 
homestretch for Tuscon, 80 miles distant over 
a very fine road with a good four horse team 
and an excellent driver. Pass the Picacho in 
the night; eat breakfast at 8 a. m. at Desert sta- 
tion, and travel on a brisk trot by some fine 
ranches along the Santa Cruz river, and at 12 
o'clock noon on Sunday, the 13th, after being 
one hundrtd and twenty-six hours on Concord 
wagons and buckboards, we arrive at Tuscon, 
a wearied, worn out, skepy set. 

Johk E. M 

Tuscon, Dec. 18, 1874. 



The Empire Mine. 

The Grass Valley Union speaks as follows of 
the Empire mine: 

This is one of the oldest quartz mines in the 
district, and is, we believe, the very oldest of 
any now being worked. The mine employs 80 
miners at $3 per day, as wages. The cost of 
sinking per foot is $12; cost of drifting, per 
foot, $8, and the cost of stamping, per ton, $5. 
The cost of extracting ore per ton is $8, and 
milling costs $1.75 per ton. The company own 
the mill. The number of tons taken out and 
worked during the year is 11,000, and the aver- 
age yield has been 16.75 per ton. Tbe percent- 
age of sulphurets has been 2%. The total 
bullion product has been $187,000. The length 
of location is 2,800 feet; course of ledge north 
and south, with the dip toward the west. The 
length of the pay zone is 1,300 feet, with an 
average thickness of 15 inches. The mine is 
worked through a shaft which has a depth of 
1,250 feet. There are 12 levels opened. Total 
length of drifts, 7,900. Cost of hoisting works, 
$40,000. Steam power is used,' and the mill 
haB 20 stamps, which weigh 900 pounds each. 
Each stamp drops 72 times in a minute, and 
the hight of the drop is nine inches. Number 
of pans, four; number of concentrators, ten. 
The cost of the mill was $40,000, and its capac- 
ity is 40 tons for every 24 hours. The sulphur- 
ets are treated by the chlorination process. 
The empire is owned by -an incorporated 
company, whose principal place of business is 
at San Francisco. Mr. David Watt is Super- 
intendent, and, Mr. James Benalleck is the 
underground foreman. 



The New " C. and C. Shaft." 

"We yesterday visited, says the Enterprise, the 
spot where the new Calif ornia and Consolidated 
Virginia shaft is being sunk, 1040 feet east of 
the present main shaft of the Consolidated Vir- 
ginia Mining company. This shaft will be 
known as the C. and C. Bhaft. It is situated a 
short distance northwest of the works 
of the Virginia City gas company. "We 
were surprised at the progress that has already 
been made on the shaft and at the life and 
bustle already visible in its vicinity. The 
shaft is larger than the shaft ^.t the present 
Consolidated Virginia hoisting works, and is; 
already down a distance of twenty-six feet. It I 
is being substantially timbered from the top, 
and quite a strong force of carpenters is now 
on the ground. A small frame building now 
covers the shaft, but there is in process of erec- 
tion over this a new building which will be 40x 
70 feet in size. In this new building will short- 
ly be set up a donkey engine to be used in. 
hoisting from the shaft. Eventually, when the 
shaft shall have attained a depth beyond 
the power of the donkey engine, there will be 
set up new and powerful hoisting machinery, 
and a new and oommodious building will take, 
the place of tbe temporary structure now about 
to bfi erected. Some of the carpenters are en- 
gaged in the erection of the temporary build- 
ing, some in framing timbers for its interior! 
works and others in cutting and fitting the tim-' 
bers ' used in the shaft. Already there is 
enough lumber and timber of various kinds on 
the ground to answer as the' start for a first- 
class lumber yard. As yet the shaft is in a 
gravel formation; ho bed rock has been reached. 
The location is a fine one for such a shaft, as 
the ground is smooth and comparatively level 
iu all directions about it for a great distance.: 
Just north of the shaft is a smalj ravine, but 
this will soon be filled up to the general level 
with the dirt and rock hoisted from the shaft. 
When they begin working the great bonanza 
through this shaft it will be quite a lively place. 
In anticipation of this there has already been 
a considerable rise in property in the neigh- 
borhood. From $400 to $500 is the price now. 
asked for lots which might have been purchased] 
for $100 a fortnight or two since. Already new 
frame buildings are to be seen going up in vari-l 
ous directions, and the indications are that in.i 
another year or two Chinatown will again be; 
absorbed, and that it will again be necessary to 
call upon the Celestials to pack their traps, 1 
pull tip stakes and build themselves a newi 
town farther out in the country; probably some 
where down on Six-mile canyon. In this new 
departure to the eastward by the Calif ornia and 
Consolidated Virginia companies, other com- 
panies will follow at no distant day, and in a 
few years there will be seen numerous shafts 
and hoisting works extending north and south 
on a line with the (( C. and C." 



Placers in Nevada. — A gentleman who has 
been prospecting in Island Mountain' district 
writes as follows to the Elko Independent; 

I toolj a pick and shovel and started to work 
in Brown and Norton's claim at the head of the 
tailrace, where it is about five feet to the -pay 
ground, of which there are three feet next to 
the bed-rock, and out of ten buckets of this, B. 
washed $5, which of course astonished me. I 
also went some 30 or 40 feet from this toward 
the side-hill and washed 10 buckets more, 
taking out the sum of $2. This satisfied me 
beyond a doubt that the ground was exceedingly 
rich and would pay from $25 to $50 per day to 
the man. I spent the balance of the day in 
panning out, and found that two bits to the 
pan was a common prospect, sometimes rang- 
ing as high as $1. I did not confine my pros- 
pects to one claim; I panned out some six or 
seven pans in Judd's olaim, which verified the 
result of the other claims, and so on up to the 
summit of the mountain. I would just as soon 
have a claim of 20 acres in Hope Gulch as 
$20,000 on deposit in Freeman & Co.'s bank. 
The miners of this place are satisfied with their 
claims, and don't care to sell. The water 
ditch is complete to the company's claims, and 
their hydraulic is set and ready to wash down 
the large bank of gravel on the bench from the 
creek. "When they get it in full blast they will 
certainly take out large quantities of gold 
dust. 



Covered or the NuGGET.^The San Juan 
(Nevada Co.) TYmessays: Acoupleof men, one 
of them a sailor and the other a blacksmith,, 
were working in a certain mine situated not fan 
from San Juan, a few days ago, being engagedj 
in piping against a bank of solid gravel. Theyf 
were working about 30 or 40 feet distant from 
each other. While thus engaged, each having; 
his eyes directed towards the bank very intent- 
ly anticipating a cave, discovered at the samei 
moment something peeping out of the bank 
which looked to them like a chunk of solid 
gold. Each dropped his piping apparatus 
and started toword tno bank to secure the prize, 
but before they reached it a cave came and 
covered up their treasure. The adage of the* 
fox and the g' apes will apply to the incident. 
The fellows are working like Trojans night and 
day to unearth the chunk of gold. 



Beaver District — A correspondent of the 
Salt Lake Tribune says: Joseph Smith and 
others have made arrangements to immediately 
erect a thirty-ton furnace at a large spring, near 
Minersville, where an abundance of ores cam 
be obtained to keep it going. The cry is send 
us a railroad to haul the bullion away, and the 
ores too, for in the range adjoining Lincoln' 
district has been found large quantities of mill- 
ing ore, which, as soon as a railroad makes its 
appearance, will be shipped forthwith, to some 
good and reliable mill or mint, there to bei 
crushed into trade dollars. The whole miningi 
interests in and near Beaver, and for 50 miles 
around, are looking up. Every day I heat 
good news from the miners in Star. Beaver 
Lake District will also shortly be placed on the 
list as good, and now is the time to invest. 

The Eagle mill started Up last Thursday, 
says the Silver State, and the machinery ran 1 
smooth as oil. The capacity of the mill is 18 1 
tons per day. A drift is being run on the 
ledge from the bottom of the shaft 130 feet 
from the surface. Two shifts are employed ini 
sinking the shaft and two more in running the> 
drift, which is now in 60 feet from - the shaft.: 
The ledge is from three to four feet wide the 
whole length of the drift. 

Village Belle.— The Village Belle in: 
Unionville continues to excite the good people' 
of that town. The ledge is located on a steep 
hillside, and a tunnel has been run on the 
ledge 50 feet into the hill. A cross drift from 
the end of the tunnel 24 feet long has not 
reached the foot wall. This 24 feet is in vein: 
matter, principally decomposed quartz, all oi 
which assays well in gold and Bilver,— Silver 
State. 



January g, 1875.] 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



19 



ECHANICAL 



Progress. 



Economic Use of Fuel. 

The following interesting summary is from 
an address recently delivered before the Eoyaj 
School of Mines, at Berlin, by G. F. Becker : 
The progress in the economical consumption 
of fuel in the last fifty years has been enor- 
mous, and has been effected in great part by 
metallurgists; and here again we find the 
Heirntitic men taking the lead. In the econ- 
omical application of the heat developed by 
foel, the Bessemer process is enormously effec- 
tive, not more than ten pounds of coal being 
requisite for the production of a hundred 
weight of steel from pig iron by this method, 
while in the older process, still in use for fine 
qualities ot steel, two hundred aud fifty pounds 
are nneded. Siemens, by making the bent 
which would escape through the chimney of an 
ordinary furnace warm the fuel aud the air 
necessary to combustion, obtains an economy 
of two-thirds the weight of fuel. It was Faber 
dii Faur, an accomplished Bavarian metallur- 
gist, who first made practical use of the gases 
which formerly escaped in immense quantities 
from the tops of blast furnaces and the enor- 
mous -blast engines, the hoisting engines, 
pumpfl and hot blast stoves, even the roastiog 
kilns of such establishments now-a-days re- 
quire no fuel except this long-neglected waste 
product. Bischof, another German engineer 
and metallulgieal author was the first to pro- 
duce gas artificially for smelting purposes, and 
this was certaiuly one of the greatest advances 
ever made in our art. By first turning it into 
gas, fuel can be much mors perfectly consume d 
than in the solid form, aud hence can be made 
to give us, as in the Siemens furnace, iu which 
only gas is used, a much higher temperature 
than is practically attained by the combustion 
of coal in the ordinary way, but perhaps" the 
greatest advantage of gas is that substances, in 
general scarcely regarded as fuel at all, can be 
employed for the production of gas with the 
most brilliant results, a mutter of the greatest 
importance,- especially in a region destitute of 
true coal, like California. Lundin, a noted 
and thoroughly educated Swedish metallurgist, 
has taught us how to produce gas from wet saw- 
dust, entirely without preparation, of such 
power that wrought iron may be melted with 
it, and the great difficulty is to find any mate- 
rial infusible enough to answer as a lining in 
the furnaces where it is consumed. You will 
receive some idea of the importance of these 
improvements from the fact that the economy 
in fuel effected in Bngland alone in the year 
1872, as compared with 1871, by the progress 
made in the introduction of more perfect ap- 
paratus, represented more than four millions of 
ions of coal. 



Glass For Veneering, Paneling, Etc. 

An — ; rt „ i, oa oi rA (uiv been made in these col- 
umns to the use of glass for lining of tanks, 
etc., and to take the place of the ordinary en- 
amel on iron— a method for the practical ac- 
complishment of which has been devised and 
patented. The great object to be gained by 
this is a surface easily cleansed, aud the possi- 
bilityjDf perfect cleanliness — as for fermen.ing 
vats, etc. It also offers a Bolution to the lead 
poisoning difficulty. 

Itmay also be.used for veneering and decora- 
ting purposes, in many cases with very good 
effect. Designs might be colored and placed 
under glass and so preserved from fading and 
wearing. 

Another good suggestion has been made by a 
writer in the Loudon Builder that thick glass 
might be easily and cheaply cemented to the 
■walls of hospitals, etc. It would be non- 
labsorbent, imperishable, easily cleaned, read- 
lily repaired if damaged by accident, aud, un- 
like paper and paint, would always be as good 
as at first. Glass can be cut or bent to conform 
to any required shape. If desired, the plates 
may be colored any cheerful tint. The non- 
absorbent quality is the most important for 
hospitals and prisons, and, we should think, 
is worthy the consideration of architects. ' 



New Engraving Process. — M. de la Grye re- 
ports a new process in engraving on copper. It 
consists, says the Scientific American, in first 
covering the plate with' a thin coating of adhe- 
rent silver, which is in turn covered with col- 
■ored varnish. The lines are then drawn with a 
■sharp point, after the fashion of using a dia- 
imond for stone engraving, and subsequently 
feunk into the plate by means of the action of 
■Iperchloride of iron. 



I Imitation Patents. — The practice of patent- 
ing imitations of articles of standard excellence 
lis growing in favor in the United States. A 
(patent lately granted is for producing an imita- 
jltion of Kussian sheet iron. This is done by 
■hammering the sheet between anvils and ham- 
Bxners that have indented surfaces, so as to give 
fjthe sheet a mottled appearance. Another 
patent is for an imitation Swiss window shade, 
in which the lace work is imitated by stencils. 

1 Improving River Navigation. — An appro- 
priation was granted by the last Congress, fur- 
nishing $40,000 for improving the .navigation 
af the Ohio, near Pittsburg. It is expected 
that this appropriation will test the efficiency 
if the system of the improvement of rivers by 
the erection of dams. 



Cutting Steel Rails Cold. 

The cutting of a file in halves with soft iron 
is an old lecture experiment. The soft iron 
forms a disc about six inches in diameter, is 
mounted on a lathe spindle, and run at absut 
2,000 revolutions per minute, A file held to 
the edge of the disc is cut in two in about ten 
or fifteen secouds, the disc being unharmed. 
The shower of sparks reuders this a brilliant 
experiment, very popular with a general au- 
dience. The principle involved is now being 
applied for a practical purpose. Mr. Charles 
White, manager, Sir J. Brown A* Co.'s Works, 
Sheffield, England, has found the cost of cut- 
ting off the ends of steel rails cold in the or- 
dinary way so enormous that ho resolved to 
try ano'her experiment. For experiment, he 
had au ordinary rail saw put in the lathe aud all 
the teeth cut off. The revolving disc was then 
mounted on a spindle aud driven at nearly 
3,000 revolutions a minute. This disc was 3 
feet in (Htimeter, so that its circumferential ve- 
locity was about 27,000 feet, or over five miles 
a minute, or over 800 miles an hour. Steel 
rails forced against the edge of this disc were 
easily cut through in three or four minutes 
each. The rails weighed 65 pounds to the 
yard. Sparks flew in abundance, and the disc 
appeared to melt the rail before it; but after 
cutting five rails the disc itself was not sensibly 
warm. The experiment was such a complete 
success that (he firm intend putting up a very 
powerful saw for the purpose of catting cold 
steel rails j — Ironmonger. 

Saws of this kind and for the purposes sim- 
ilar to those nimed were iu operation at two 
steel works in Pittsburg, Pa., before the ex- 
periments at Sheffield were made public. The 
application is no doubt a very important and 
valuable one. 



Bronzks Incrustes. — This is the name given 
to a new style of bronze or copper work orna 
mented with gold and silver and manufactured 
in Paris. The ornamentation is produced by 
etching and electroplating, and consists in the 
following operations: After the object which 
may be of massive copper or bronze, has re- 
ceived the desired form; the drawings are made 
with water colors, the body of which is white 
lead. If several pieces are to have the same 
des-ign, it may be printed on as in porcelain 
aud fayence painting. Those portions of the 
surface not painted are covered with varnish. 
The article is then placed in dilute nitric acid 
where the paint is dissolved off and the surface 
of the metal is etched to a certain depth 
When the etching is finished the article is 
washed with water and immediately placed in 
a silver or gold bath, and a layer of the pre- 
cious metal deposited by electricity on the ex- 
posed portions. When the latter operation is 
finished the varnish is perfectly removed and 
the whole surface ground or polished 60 that 
the ornamental portion is just even with the 
remainder ot me suriace. xiio uontoura nro 
quite sharp. The surface is then bronzed which 
does not change the color of the gold or silver. 
A specially fiue effect is obtained by producing 
a black Bronze of sulpburet of copper on por- 
tions of the surface between the silver orna- 
ments. A copper vessel then has three colors, 
black and white drawings on a red brown 
ground of suboxide of copper. This new 
process for ornamenting metats has been de- 
vised at Christofle's works since the Paris ex- 
position of 1867. These goods are so expensive 
as to be only accessible to the few, although 
much cheaper than those in which the engrav- 
ing is done by hand, and the gold or silver in- 
serted by mechanical means. The production 
of an incrustation requires a high degree of 
manual skill and patience, but no costly ma- 
chinery. Every brass foundry contains all 
the necessary tools for the mechanical opera- 
tions. 



A New Shell. — Various experiments have 
been made by a War Committee on explosives, 
with a view of ascertaining the practical effect 
of Professor Abel's proposed plan for the 
bursting of common shells filled with water, by 
means of a detonator, consisting of dry com- 
pressed-gun-cotton enveloping a small cap of ful- 
minate of mercury. Some morbus ago the practi- 
cabilityof exploding 16-lb common shells inthis 
manner was satisfactorily established, and the 
result of such an arrangement was the bursting 
of a shell into 300 fragments, whereas only 
about thirty pieces were producad by the ex- 
plosion of an ordinary bursting charge of gun- 
powder. The effect of such an explosion 
among troops in the field could not be other- 
wise than disastrous in the. extreme. Lately, 
however, experiments have been made with 
9-ineh common shells, which far exceed in ef- 
fect that of any conducted with the field service 
common shell. On this occasion the bursting 
element employed was wet gun-cotton in lieu 
of water. The result was extraordinary, the 
shells bursting literally into thousands of 
pieces. 

Improvement in Map Making.— Lloyd, the 
famous map man, who made all the maps for 
General Grant and the Union army, has in- 
vented a way of getting a relief plate from 
steel so as* to print a map 40x50 inches in size 
on a fast working power press. This will so 
much cheapen the price of map-maknig as to 
enable him to furnish an unmounted map of 
the above size on bank note paper, plain and 
unvarnished for 10 cents, or 25 cents colored 
and varnished. 




The Vacuum an Absolute Non-Conductor 
of Electricity. 

We condense the following from the Scientific 
American: "The passage of electricity through 
rarefied air constitutes a well known experi- 
ment in the lecture room of physical science. 
The oldest style of performing it is to attach, 
by means of a stopcock connection, a long 
glass tube to the air pump, ench end of the 
tube being provided with brass caps. The 
electrieity may be made to flow through its in- 
terior as soon as the exhaustion of the air ha-^ 
proceeded to a certain extent; then a most 
beautiful exhibition is produced in the dark, 
resembling the aurora borealis; hence such a 
tube is culled an aurora tube, and the aurora 
borealis has been ascribed to a discharge of 
electricity from the polar regions to the equa- 
tor, through the stratum of rarefied air above 
the clouds. 

Experiments prove that electricity is retained 
on the surface of bodies by the presence of the 
atmosphere, which iB an isolating substance; 
and that when its pressure decreases, the 
escape of electricity becomes easier; while, in 
a good vacuum, the resistance to escape be- 
comes zero, and the electricity flows off and 
caunot be retained at all. This has for a long 
time been tho accepted theory, and is still 
taught in most text books on physics, and is 
believed in by most electricians; but that it is 
an error was proved by Becquerel, Hawksbee, 
Gray aud Snow Harris, as they showed that 
even the weakest electric discharges could be 
retained in vacuo. Be*eque"rel even went so 
far as to show that the charge was retained for 
15 days, provided that the vacuum was so per- 
fect as to be equal to a mercurial pressure of 
the twenty-fifth part of an inch; and he con- 
cluded that, in a perfect vacuum, the body 
would retain the charge for ever; in other words 
that electricity could not be transmitted through 
an absolute vacuum. 

Du Moncel, in his lately published French 
work on the Ruhuikorff coil, gives an account 
of his experiments in passing a powerful elec- 
tric current through a tube in which the air 
was being more and more rarefied, and states 
that, when the vacuum was made very nearly 
perfect by the continued operation of a good 
air- pump, the passage of electricity through 
the tube continually diminished; so that at 
last, when the pressure had decreased to less 
than a half millimeter (one-fiftieth of an inch) 
the light had almost disappeared, while tests 
proved that very little electricity passed; when, 
however, a little air was gradually admitted 
into the tube, the electric current was re-estab- 
lished, and the light appeared again. 

Gassiot was the first who attempted to make 
an absolute vacuum, deprived of all traces of 
air or gas. He produced a vacuum much 
more perfect than any one ever did before; 
while hia manner ol procedure allowed the ex- 
periment to be extended over several days, and 
even weeks. When the vacuum had been 
made with the air pump on carbonic acid, an 
electric discharge, which, iu the air, would not 
pass over a distance of half an inch, traversed 
20 inches with the greatest ease. In propor- 
tion as the vacuum became more perfect by 
the absorption of the carbonic acid, the dis- 
charge tended to fill the tube with a more and 
more pale luminous vapor. The vacuum be- 
coming more perfect in the course of several 
days, the luminosity became confined to the 
sides, where the platinum wires, which con- 
ducted the electricity, entered into the vacuum 
and a certain space, half way, became dark, 
and this darkness extended itself, so that, in a 
tube of 20 inches length, it occupied nearly 10 
inches* When a galvanometer was placed in 
the circuit, it indicated that there was no 
longer a constant discharge as before, but oc- 
casionally alternate discharges; when also the 
tube showed light flashes, and the so-called 
stratification of the light. When at last the 
absorption went on, and formed a perfect 
vacuum, perfect darkness was obtained in tbe 
tube, and no trace of light showed itself, even 
with strong electric charges, while neither the 
galvanometer nor an ordinary vacuum tube, 
when introduced into the circuit, would mani- 
fest a trace of any current. From nil this, it is 
therefore evident that it is practically demon- 
strated that the absolute vacuum is not only a 
non-conductor, but that it is absolutely im- 
penetrable by electric discharges. 

Singular Cause of Boilee Explosion. — The 
tube of a boiler recently exploded in a 
foundry at Liege, Belgium, was caused, as 
shown on examination by the corrosive 
action of ferrous sulphate and sulphuric 
acid, derived from the sulphur iu the coal fuel. 
This discovery strangely points to the necessity 
of carefully and frequently cleaning the for- 
ward portion of the boiler tubes, and other 
parts which do not come in direct contact with 
the flame. 



The Magic Lantern in Disease. — Dr. Bal- 
mano, a London surgeon, has successfully ap- 
plied the magic lantern to the study of diseases 
of the skin. A transparent photograph of the 
skin is taken and then placed in a magic 
lantern. A strong hydro-oxygen light casts the 
picture enlarged on a white sheet, and in this 
way the smallest details are brought out with 
astonishing minuteness. 



The Mysteries of the Human Throat. 

Dr. Frederick Fieber, of Vienna, like the 
little boy with his drum, not content with en- 
joying the melody of Madam Pauline Lucca, 
has made a close scrutiny of the throat whence 
the sweet sounds issue, and publishes the re- 
sult of his investigations. The mechanical 
apparatus which is the instrument of tho men- 
ial faculty, appears, iu Madame Lucca's case, 
to be beautifully perfect, the result to some ex- 
tent, perhaps of congenita fitness,' but also 
doubtless, partly of the s.-ientific training to 
which the artiste hus been subjected in early 
youth. Examined under the laryngoscope, the 
larynx appears small and well shaped, its sev- 
eral parts beiug marvelously developed and 
perfect. The true strings are pure snow white 
and po-sess none of the bluish tinge common 
among women. Altbough shorter tbau usual 
among vocalists they are btronger in proportion 
and amply provided with muscle. When at 
rest they are pirtially screened by the false 
strings; but Dr. Feber, who watched Madame 
Lucca's throat through his instrument whilst 
she was singing, noticed that as sojn as a tone 
was struck, they displayed themselves in their 
full breadth and strength. Tbe aid given by a 
suitable form of mouth to the production of 
vocal music is a novel and interesting point 
brought out by Dr. Fieber. On being admitted 
lo a view of the arti-te's mouth he was at once 
struck with the spaciousness and symmetry of 
its hollow, the otherwise perfect symmetry being 
impaired only by the absence of a tonsil, which 
had been removed, as well as with the vigor 
with which every tone produced raised the "sail" 
of he palate. Dr. Fieber is of opinion that the 
natural conformation of her nioutu accounts in a 
large measure for the wonderful power Madame 
Lucca possesses of raising and dropping her 
voice alternately. The sound waves are natu- 
rally strengthened in so favorably shaped a 
space, while the muscles of the palate appeared 
to have acquired exceptional strength and pli- 
ability by long practice. 

Metallic Sulphides. — The reactions of sul- 
phuretted hydrogen upon metallic salts are very 
different and often much opposed, according to 
the nature of the bases of tbe acids, and fiually 
of the concentration of the solutions. Sulphu- 
retted hydrogen precipitates weak solutions of 
l j ad, of copper, of mercury and silver; and 
this precipitation so often utilized in analysis 
is always accompanied by a disengagement of 
heat. A number of experiments show that a 
solution of sulphuretted hydrogen changes the 
chloride of silver and the bromide of silver into 
the sulphides. It has also been proved tiut the 
contrary reactions can be realized. In other 
terms the sulphuretted hydrogen decomposes ■ 
the chlorides of lead, of copper, and of mercury 
in weak solutions, whilst hydrochloric acid 
ought to decompose in an inverse sense the 
corresponding sulphides. It is the decompos- 
ing action of the water upon the neutral salt 
which is the origin of the observed absorption 
of heat. Sulphurelted hydrogen ought 
not, in principle, to decomptsi any salt of 
manganese. However, sulphuretted hydro- 
gen attacks, in truth the acetate of manganese, 
with a sensible precipitatiou of sulphide of 
manganese and also with the absorption of heat. 

Action of Magnets on Spectra. — An im- 
portant fact has been noticed by M. Choquart 
of the French Academy of Science-, wbich may 
seriously interfere with many of the conclusions 
heretofore drawn from the appearauce of the 
spectra of the heavenly bodies. M. Choquart 
states that the effect of magnetic influence on 
the. spectra of the flames o'f sulphur and 
silenium is to cause them to pale and finally 
to become quite extinguished. On the other 
hand the same influence multiplies the rays 
and renders more brilliant the spectra of clo- 
rine and bromine. The effect, says the Investi- 
gator, is so rapid as to seem magical. The re- 
sult of these discoveries is to render the 
deductions from the spectra of the heavenly 
bodies only to be accepted-with great caution, 
as they virtually introduce a new element to be 
considered in drawing conclusions from the 
aspect of the same. 

An Experiment with Silver, — Bcetfger offers 
the following experiment to show the formation 
of binoxide of silver and metallic silver by 
electrolysis. A concentrated solution of nitrate 
of silver is placed in a wide glass cylinder, and 
two platinum wires, forming the poles of a gal- 
vanic battery, are placed in the solution in a 
vertical position, about three inches apart. 
Beneath the anode is placed a small watch giass, 
and the current from two Bunsel cells started. 
In a few minutes brilliant needles of binoxide 
of silver appear on the anode, and becoming 
too heavy to remain unsupported, fall on the 
watch glass beneath. On the cathode" an 
equivalent quantity of pure metallic silver col- 
lects in snow-white dendritic ramifications. 

Fatty Matters in Cast Iron. — An experi- 
ment made long ago by Proust revealed the fact 
that fatty matters can be extracted from cast 
iron when the latter is dissolved in certain 
acids. M. Cloez has recently separated these 
materials in a pure state, and their analysis re- 
veals the interesting fact that they consist of 
carburets of hydrogen of the series Q 2n Tl 2a , 
and present all the terms thereof at least from 
C6 H6 —propylene— to C 16 H ] 6. This is a veri- 
table organic synthesis, realized by the aid of 
substances purely mineral, and is susceptible 
consequently of important applications. In 
the Science Record for 1873 will be found an 
account of the extraction of similar matters 
from meteoric iron. 



20 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS 



[January 9, 1875. 



Mining Stocks. 

Mining stocks continue "booming." The 
■whole town seems in a state of excitement and 
nothing is heard but ore, drifts, levels bo- 
nanza and other mining terms. Everybody 
talks stocks, and reads stocks, and there seems 
to be no other topic of interest at present. 
Cash sales are the rule, and the margin buy- 
ers have taken a back seat or are content with 
fewer shares and smaller profits. Our stock 
tables in this column show the prices of 
all the) stocks, some of which are almost fabu- 
lous, compared to their value a year since. 
The great bonanza on the Gomstock is the 
talk of the country or city, and is said to be 
still spreading to the eastward. Prospecting 
has been stimulated around the Gomstock to 
a great degree, and claims are being locate d on 
the mineral belt in all directions. The En- 
terprise says: In all direotions along the Gom- 
stock and in the silver belt the utmost Ac- 
tivity prevails. Not only is work being most 
vigorously prosecuted on the old claims, but 
much work is beginning to be done on new 
locations. It has now come to be the pretty 
generally received opinion — the suggestion was 
made by us a short time since — and that a certain 
belt of country is silver-bearing that it makes 
but little difference whether or not quartz is 
found on tbe surface so long as the location is 
favorable and the rock shows certain charac- 
teristics. This metalliferous belt is pretty 
strongly marked on the surface— the hills and 
the ground being of a yellowish or reddish 
tinge, very different from the dead hue seen in 
hills where the underlying rock is pure granite 
or other barren country rock. Below Gold Hill 
all the prospecting companies are very active, 
and all have new ideas of the strength and 
capacity of our silver range. When day after 
day they are driving ahead in the Consolidated 
Virginia without passing through their ore 
body the most experienced miners, experts, 
scientists, and all who know anything whatever 
of ores and mines are astounded. At once 
their ideas of the value of a location anywhere 
within the miner al belt go up at least one hun- 
dred per cent., and they do not feel like call- 
ing any mine "wildcat." Three months hence 
the mining excitement will not be confined so 
exclusively to tbe north end of the lead as it is 
at present. There will be developments mad< 
that will cause it to spread to the southward. 

The Moore & Morgan, on the Comstock, is a 
newly located mine, situated at the bead of 
Comstock ravine, near the Europa mine, and 
some five thousand ft south of the Consoli- 
dated "Virginia. The croppings at the surface 
look very favorable, and as if it would not re- 
quire any great depth to find pay ore at that 
point. The locators are energetic men, with 
plenty of capital. 

Sales at the S. F. Stock Exchange. 



MINING SHAREHOLDERS' DIRECTORY. 



Compiled every Thursday from Advertisements in the Mining and Scientific Press and 

other S. F. Journals. 1 



ASSESSMENTS.— STOCKS ON THE LIST OF THE BOARDS. 



Company. 



Location. No. Ami. Levied*. Delinq'nt. Sale. Secretary. Place of Business 



American Flag M & M Co Ely District 

American Flat M Co Wasboe 

Andes S M Co Washoe 

Arizona <fc Utah M Co Washoe 

Arizona S M Co Unionville Nevada 

Baltimore Cons M Co Washoe 

Bellevue M C" Placer Co Oal 

Bowery Cons M Co Ely District 

Buckeye GiSMOo 

ChariotMill & M Co 

Cherry Creek MiMCo 

Chollar-Potosi M Co 

Danev M Co 

Empire Mill & M Co 

Era Dire M Co 

Globe Cons M Co 

Globe M Co 

Golden Chariot M Co 

Ida Elmore M Co 

Tmpenal S M Co 

Indus G&SMCo 

Justice M Co 

Kentuck M Co 

Knickerbocker M Co 

Lady Bryan M Co 

Lady WashioEton M Co 

MahoncayC ASMCo 

Mint G & S M Co 

MoDito>-_Belm"nt M Co 

New York Con*; M Co 

Original G-ld Hill GiSMCo u'ashoe 

Original Hidden Treasure White Pine 

Overman S M Co 

Page Tunnel Co 

Pioche S M Co 

Pioche w est Ex M Co 

Poorman G 4 S M Co 

Raymond & Ely M o 

Rock Island A, S M Co 

Red Jacket M Co 

Snvage M Co 

Sierra Nevada S M Co 

Silver Cord M Co 

South Chariot M Co 

Thrift G & S M Co 

Tyler M Co 



Nevada 

San Diego Co 

Nevada 

Washoe 

Washoe 

Washoe 

Idaho 

Washoe 

Washoe 

Idaho 

Idaho 

Washoe 

Washoe 

Washoe 

Washoe 

Wiishoe 

Nevada 

Washoe 

Idaho 

Washoe 

Nevada 

Washoe 



Washoe 

Utah 

Ely District 

Ely District 

Idaho 

Ely Distriot 

Wasboe 

Idaho 

Washoe 

Washoe 

Idaho 

Idaho 

Calaveras Co Cal 

Washoe 



Utah S M Co Washoe 

War Eagle M Co Idaho 

Washington & Creole M Co Ely Dist 
Watson M Co Robinson Dist > evada 
Wnodville GASM Co Washoe 

Yellow Jacket S M Co Washoe 

Yule Gravel M Co Placer Co Cal 



50 Nov 10 

1 00 Dec 7 

50 Dec 7 

75 Dec 10 

1 00 Nov 30 

1 00 Dec 5 

50 Dec 10 

20 Dec 15 

1 00 Nov 14 

50 Dec 24 

15 Nov 10 

5 00 Nov U 

1 00 Oct 27 

50 Dec 28 

1 00 Nov 10 

75 Dec 10 

75 Dec 10 

1 50 Jau4 

1 00 Nov 16 

1 00 Nov 26 

25 Dec 30 

3 00 Nov 13 

1 0(1 Dec 3 

1 50 Dec 28 
50 Nov 11 
30 Dec 17 

2 00 Jan 5 
10 Nov 17 
50 Nov 10 
50 Dec 5 
50 Dec 12 

I 00 Oct 12 

3 00 Dec 1 

5 Dec 12 

- Dec II 

30 Dec 28 

50 Nov 13 

3 00 Nov 3 

1 00 Nov 16 

SO Nov 28 

5 00 Dec 5 

3 00 Dec 1 

1 00 Jan 2 

50 Nov 5 

50 Nov 24 

50 Nov iy 

1 00 Nov 25 

1 00 Nov 9 

50 Dec 8 

1 00 Nov 16 

1 I'O Nov 9 

5 00 Dec 10 

10 Nov 9 



Deo 14 
Jan 9 
Jan 11 
Jan 14 
Jan 8 
Jan 8 
Jan 14 
Jan 25 
Dec 18 
Jan 23 
Deo 14 
Deo 18 
Dec 4 
Jan 29 
Dec 10 
Jan 14 
Jan It 
FebS 
Dec 21 
Deo 29 
Jan 30 
Dec 15 
Jan 5 
Jan 30 
Deo 16 
Jan 21 
Feb 11 
Deo 22 
Dec 14 
Jan 6 
Jan 14 
Dee 11 
Jan 5 
Jan 20 
J*n 21 
Feb 3 
Dec 18 
Dec 10 
Dec 21 
Jan 5 
Jan 1 
Jan 5 
Feb 5 
Dec 11 
Deo 26 
Jan 21 
Dec 30 
Deo 16 
JanU 
Dec 21 
Dec 14 
Jan 13 
Dec 1 i 



Jan II 
Jan 27 
Feb 1 
Feb 2 
Jan 29 
Jan 29 
Feb 4 
Feb 28 
Jan 7 
Feb 13 
Jan 7 
Jan 7 
Deo 38 
Feb 18 
Jan 4 
Feb 2 
Feb 2 
Fpb28 
Jan 12 
Jan 19 
Feb 18 
Jan 15 
Jan 28 
Feb i9 
Jan II 
Feb 8 
Mar 4 
Jan 15 
Jan 4 
Jan 25 
Febl 
Ja'i7 
Jim 26 
Feb 20 
Feb 16 
Feb 25 
Jan 11 
Jan 7 
Jan 12 
Jan 26 
Jan 27 
Jan 26 
Feb 26 
Jan 5 
Jan 16 
Feb 12 
Jan 20 
J n6 
Feb 4 
Jan 13 
. T , i n 5 
Feb 13 
Jan 5 



G R Spinney 
C A Sankey 
M Landers 
J Maguire 
Wna Willis 
D T Bagley 
DFVe/denal 
CE Elliott 
C A Sankey 
V Swift ' 
D F Verdenal 
W E Dean 
G R Srjinney 
W E Dean 
Willi m Willis 
J Maguire 
J MagQiro 
L Kaplan 
Willia Willis 
W E Dean 
D Wilder 
J S Kennedy 
F Swilt 
H Boyle 
F Swift 
H C Kibbe 
O B Higgins 
D A Je 'mugs 
W W Hopkins 
H C Kibbe 
W M Helraan Fi 
DA Jennings 
G D Edwards 
J Ha dy 
O E Elliott 
T L Kimb ill 
William Willis 
T •' Colburn 
J W Clark 
Wm Willis 
E B Holmes 
G D Edwards 
Frank Swift 
O H Bugart 
H R West 
O D Squire 
W E Dean 
L Ka Ian 
F D Clear? 
W H Watson 
W M He I man 
G W Hopkins 
W H Watson 



320 California st 

331 Montgomery st 

507 Montgomery st 

419 C lifornin st 

419 California st 

401 California -t 

409 California at 

419 f'alifon ia st 

331 Montgome-y st 

419 California at 

409 California st 

419 California st 

320 California st 

414 Ca ifornia st 

419 California st 

419 Calif tfrniast 

419 California si 

Merchants' Ex 

419 'alifornia st 

419 Cali'ornia st 

Mi rohan-s' Ex 

Merchants 1 Ex 

419 California st 

Stevenson's Bldg 

419 t'a'iforniasi 

419 California st 

402 Montgomerv st 

401 California st 

411'*. C ■lifomiast 

419 California st 

reman's Fund BMg 

401- California si 

414 California st 

418 California st 
419 ' 'alifornia st 
4l'9Cilifomiast 

419 Cali'ornia st 

418 California st 
4)8 California st 

419 Calif omiast 
419 Calif orniflMt 
414 California st 

419 California st 

402 M'jnlcomery st 

240 Montgomery st 

Stevenson's Bldg 

419 California st 

401 California st 

Merchants' Ex 

302 Montgomery st 

401 California si 

Gold Hill 

302 Montgomery st 



INING lUMMARY. 



The following Is mostly condensed from journals pub- 
lished in the interior.in proximity to the mineB mentioned. 



OTHER COMPANIES— NOT ON THE LISTS OF THE BOARDS. 



Baltic Cons M Oo 
Calaveras Hydraulic M Co 
Combination G & S M Co 
Con Reforma LASMOo 
Edith Quicksilver M Co 
Enterp ise Cons M Co 
Florence M Co 
"MCi 



Last Week. 

Wednesday, Deoembee 30. 
mobning session. 

750 Alpha 37M@# 

90 ....b30 40@3 

805 Belcher i....Sffi&b&6 

6765 B* B 60>'^ 

525 ....b 5 61 

50 ....b30 

615 Chollar 8\_- 

1707 Crown Pt.... 48® 

340 CG Hill 7@7J4 

560 Confidence 44@45 

645 Con Vir 560@i>70 

20 ....b 30 580 

670 California 460@48l 

10 ....b 30 49*1 

730 D.ney 2,Vr&'- 

860 Empire M lmuk 

20SO GiC 52@4; 

380 HAN 66@6S 

510 Kentuck 22&@23 

.50 ....b30 lVi ' 

1920 Imperial 1!„ 

60 ...b30 ia'c 

2215 Mexican .\V^i-> 

10U ,...b30 4ii<i-!l 

920 Ophir 1950)188 

100 ....b30 192,'b 

300 ....b5 190@19.-f 

59i Savage . . .l^-iX.fVS 

1260 S Nev....: "".:<;.;.■ 

20 ....b30 ...81 

465 Y Jacket.... 
50 ....b30 



This Week. 

Thtjbsdat, January 7. 



RoldMtGMOo 
Gold Run M Co 
Golden Rule S MCo 
Hayes G A sM Co- 
Illinois Central M Co 
Juniata n<>ns S M Co 
Kennedy M Co 



Wasboe 

Cal 

Panamint 

Lower Oal 

Cal 

Cal 

Humboldt Co Cal 

Washoe 



Holcomb Valley * 

Nevada Co Cal 

Utah 

Robinson r>ist 

Idaho 

Aurora Nev 

Amador Co Cal 



Keystone No 1 & 2 M Co Arizona 

Lake Taho* A SF Water Works Cal 6 

Martin & Walling M & M Co Cal 1 

New York MOo Washoe 11 

North Bloomfield Gravel M Co Cal 35 

North Fork M Co Plumas Co Cal 7 

Oneida H Co Amador Co Cal 10 

Rattlesnake Quicksilver M Co Cal 2 

South Pork M & Canal Oo Cal 

Star Ki"gS MCo Elko Co Nevada 9 

Succor MAMCo Washoe 10 

Wells. Fargo & Co M Co Washoe I 

Yarborough S M Co Kern Co Cal 6 



15 Nov 18 

5 Dpc7 

10 Dec 28 

50 Dec 24 

20 Dec 23 

12^Dec 26 

10 Dec 5 

] 00 Dp c 29 

50 Nov 19 

20 Dec 7 

5 Dec8 

2<» Jan 4 

30 Dec 24 

1 00 Dec 16 

1 00 Dec 16 

1 00 Dec 12 

25 Nov 18 

50 Dec 7 

50 Dec 5 

1 00 Dec 1 

75 Dec 5 

1 00 Dec 11 

1 25 Dec 24 

5 Dec 7 

2-5 Deo 4 

1 00 Nov 27 

Deo 21 

30 Dbc 23 



Dec 23 
Jan 9 
Feb 1 
Jan 30 
F<-b 3 

Feb 6 
Jan 8 

Feb 2 

Jan 11 
Jan 15 
Feb 12 
Jan 30 
Jan 21 
Jan 20 
Jan 12 
Dec 23 
Jan 8 
Jan 6 
Jan 4 
Jan 4 
Jan 16 
Jan 28 
Jan 10 
Jan 8 
Jan 4 
Jan HO 
Jan 30 



Jan 20 
Jan 25 
Feb 23 
Feb 20 
Feb 23 

Mar 3 

Feb 3 
Feb 20 
Jan 23 

Feb 3 
Feb 15 

Alar 8 
Feb 23 
Feb 10 
Feb 10 

Febl 
Jan IS 
Jan 23 
Jan 25 

Jan 25 
Jan 19 

Feb 3 
Feb 19 

Febl 
Jan 26 

Jan 25 
Feb 18 

Feb 23 



MEETINGS TO BE HELD. 



Name of Co. 



Location. Secretarv- 



..170 



AVTEIIKOON SESSION. 



2690 Andes 

J00 .....bS 

190 Am Flag 

1415 Belmont J 

25 ....b30 

325 Cherry Creek. ...23$@2% 

50 ChMill 

710 Caledonia 

415 En Con 16J£@L6 

100 EldoS 25s 

10 Excheq 215 

285 J ui-tice 95(0)100 

21*35 Julia 9@10 

1100 Kossuth as 

805L Wash 19 

1075 Ludy Bryan 6} 

3180 Leo \m 

500 ....b 30 

265 M Val 5? 

20 Mahog __ 

350 Mint 45o 

210 N-wark 75@87^i 

309 NUtah - ft 

50 NCarson 

820 Or£H ITgm 

710 Overman SK ^ 

30 Pioche 3H 

50 Prussian Z% 

3i0 RAEly 25X@2G 

370 Rv« Patch 3%@4U 

5 SValW 99 

700 S R I IVSM'V 

99 Seg Bel l&Qffljia 

250 Suocor .5&C 

150 WaenAO T5c 

50 War Eaalo \% 

1610 Woodvlfie 8®m 

2700 Ward 



MORNING SESSION. 

920 Ophir 3U'@315 

100 ....b 10 325 

3355 Mexican 68@75 

" G&U 560/60 

1745 Best&Bel 67@<2 

10 ....blO 70;o)71 

260 Savage 182S@190 

2*5 Chollar 86@90 

260 H AN 65^(§69 

446 Crown Pi 45@J6 

275 Jacket 147@150 

10 ....b 30 153 

1205 Imperial 17«&19 

645 Empire 14@15 

190 L'onG Hill 6% 

240 Kentuck 22>$@24 

LO05 Belcher.. 55(g>57 

100 Am Flag 2)4 

3190 Andes... 14@10^ 

1225 Belmont 14@13^ 

500 Caledonia.... 30ft?33 

210 Eureka Con... .I4^@f37-s 

65 Excheq 400(6395 

3210 Kossuth 5@5>£ 

225 Justice... 120ta)140 

2515 Julia 19@16 

1820 Lady Wash 5@4 

2300 Lady Bryan 1)t.@W 

3664 Leo 3W@3 

b25 Confidence.." 45(346 

205 Con Vir 645@700 

10 ....b5 660 

1765 Sierra N 25@27Jt 

690 Daney 2J*@3W; 

250 California 7SW@79S 

790 ....b30 790S-8U0 

10 Excheq 350 

705 OFerman 85(gB6 

115 Justice 115@120 

355 Succor 7@7M 

2170 L*dy Bryan 77@8 

975 Julia 18@18>i 

350 Caledonia 29>|@3u' 

545 Knickerbocker ....6@6!£ 

420 Globe lii@ljlf 

1 140 Bait Con 10(gtl0^ 

720 Alpha 40&43 

195 Meadow Val 6M@6 

160 Pioche 4 

415 Ray & Ely 25 

520 Rye Patch 4@3;V 

110 Seg Bel 140feU5l 



Beach & Paxtnn GAS 
Buckeye (USMCo 
Kullion M Co 
California M Co 
California M Co 
Consolidated Virginia 
Consolidated Virginia M Co 
Dexter S M Co 
Emerald Hill M Co 
"420" MCo 
Gold Run M Co 
Gonld A Curry S M Co 
Ironsides M Co 
Iowa M Co 
Knickerbocker M Co 
Kossuth M Co 
Memnon M Co 
North Utah M Co 
Orleans M Co 
Sierra Nevada S M Co 
State of Maioe MAMCo 
Succor MitMCo 
Utica Cons M Co 
Union Cons M Oo 
Webfoot M Oo Elko 



Cal 


J T4 Tlfihinson 




Called by Trustees 




(Jailed by Trustes 


Wasboe 


J S Kennedv 




Called by Trustees 
D T Bagley 


Waahne 


Washoe 


Called by Trustees 




D T Baeley 




F H Hill 


Nevida 


F Madge 




E F Stone 


Cal 


C O Palmer 




Called by Trustees 




W E Dean 




A D Carpenter 




H Boyle - 
EF St ne 






W E Dean 




O S Cti' tiss 




W E Dean 




R v; egencr 




J M Burlington 
Called by Trustees 


Wasboe 






wasnoe 


Called by Trustees 


Co Nevada 


D A Jennings 



Offioo infl.F. 

305 Sansome st 

507 Montgomery st 

331 Montgomery st 

Merchants' Ex 

401 California st 

401 California st 

401 California st 

401 Calif orn ast 

411'? California st 

Mer hants' Ex 

419 0-iliforniaet 

41 Market st 

43SOalitomiast 

419 California st 

605 Clay Bt 

Stevenson's Block 

419 California st 

419 California st 

419 California st 

419 California st 

414 California st 

Merchants' Ex 

302 Montgomery st 

419 California st 

Merchants' Ex 

401 Calilorniabt 



B Bnrris 
A Shear 
D Wilder 
A D Carpenter 
W Stuart 
F J Hermann 
I E D^lavau 
E F Stone 
J P Cavalier 
C C Palmer 
K Wertheiiner 
G R Spinney 
R II Brown 
C S Nenl 
A Wissel 
W R Townsend 
E Chat tin 
J W Tripp 
H C Kibbe 
I Derby 
A Martin 
L Kaplan 
A Baird 
H Knapp 
L Kapl_i n 
W H Watson 
A O Taylor 
E Barry 



Annual 
Special 
Special 
Annual 
Special 
Annual 
Special 
Annual 
Annual 
Annual 
Annii'l 
An< ual 
Special 
Annual 
Annual 
Annual 
Annual 
Annual 
Annua! 
Annual 
Annual 
Annual 
Special 
Annual 
Special 
Annual 



507 Montgomery st 

821 Battery st 

Merchants' Ex 

605 Clay st 

113 Liedesdortf st 

418 Kearny st 

2.0 Mont ornery st 

419 California st 

513 California st 

41 Market st 

530Clavst 

320 Calif, .rniast 

402 Montgomerv st 

419 California st 

210 California st 

330 Pine st 

80S Montgomery st 

408 California st 

419 (Jalifornia st 

320 'California Bt 

520 Washington st 

Merchants' Ex 

316 California st 

3P6 Montg mery st 

Merchants' Ex 

302 Montgomery st 

331 Montgomery st 

415 Montgomery s 



Date. 

Jan 15 
Jan 14 
Jan 2(1 
Jan 14 
Jan 26 
Jan 20 
Jan 26 
Jan 14 
Jan 9 
Jan 12 
Jan II 
Jan 14 
Jan 25 
Jan 13 
Jan 12 
Jan 15 
Jan 18 
Jan 12 
Jan 14 
Jan 12 
Jan 20 
Jan II 
Jan 30 
Jan 13 
Jan 23 
Jan 11 



LATEST DIVIDENDS (within three months)— MINING INCORPORATIONS. 



Name of Co. 



Location. Secretary. 



Black Bear Quartz M. Co. 
Belcher M. Co. 
Chariot M A M Co 
Consolidated Virginia M Co 
Crown Point M Co 
Diana M. Co. 

Enreka Consolidated M Co 
KeystonB Quartz M Co 
Phcenix G M Co 
Rye Patch M Co 



Oal W. L. Oliver, 
Washoe. H- O. Kibbe, 
Cal Frank Swift 
Washoe D T Bauley 
Washoe. -OE Elliott 
N. O. Fa*sefc 
Nev WWTraylor 
Cal L "Vesaria 

Charles E Elliott 
Nevada D F Verdenal 



Office in S. P. 

316 California st. 
419 California st, 
4i9 California st 
401 California st 
414 California st 
220 Clav st. 
419 California st 

419 California st 
409 California st 



Amount. 

30 
3 00 

40 
3 OR 
2 00 
1 00 

50 

50 

50 

25 



Payable. 

July 17 
Jan 11 
Nov 16 
JanU 
Dec 12 

J an . 25 
Jan 5 
Feb 16 

June 3* 
Jan 9 



New Incorporations. 



AFTERNOON SESSION. 

705Ray4EIy 25®25^ 

540 Eur Con WA®U)i 

200 W Creole % 

170 Am Flag i!@2J4 

300 Pioche 3& 

1325 Belmont 13?4^14 

2i5 Independence 2 

85 Chariot Mill 3 

340 Golden Chariot.... 2?^@3 

100 IdaEllmore &£ 

125 Mahogany 4^ 

1020 Newark %@l 

550 Jtl Belmont 2@2>4 

780 Eldo South 2j£@23j 

50 Cherry Creek 2 

i'300 SChariot \)£ 

650 Bullion 47@48 

590 Utah 9ft@L0 

6.i Bacon Jj% 

2510 SHilt ■ 17@18 

115 Eclipse H. l *@na£ 

170 Trench imiiii 

705 Challenge 13M@14 

233} Dayton 5MM 

1775 Rock Is 9M@10 



The following companies have filed certificates of in- 
corporation in the County Clerk's Office. San FranciBCO. 

Nobts- Western Quicksilver M. Co., Jan. 4.— Loca- 
tion: Sonoma county. Capital stock, $1,000,000. Direc- 
tors—John Garber, David McClure, W. H. Sears, Israel 
Knox and Wm. A. Stuart. 

Ocean-View Quicksilver M. Co., Jan. 5. — Location: 
San Simeon Mining District, San Luis Obispo County. 
Capital stock, $6,000,000. Directors— H. K. Moore, J. 
H. Dali, E. B. Burdick, J. F. Greenman and Daniel 
Buck. 

The following named, companies have filed certificates 
of incorporation in the office of the Secretary of State 
at Sacramento. 

Castro Coal Co.— Capital stock, $1,000,000, in shares 
of $10 each. 

Elk Grove Building Co. — Capital stock, $3,000, in 
shares of $5 each. 

Increase of Capital Stock.— The Virginia Consoli- 
dated M. Co. has filed a certificate of increase of capital 
stock with the County Clerk. The capital stock has 
been increased from $3,000,000, divided into 30,000 
shares of $100 each, to $6,000,000, divided into 60,000 
shares of the par value of $100 each. The certificate 
states that $5,000 of the capital stock haB been paid up; 
that the total amount of debts of the corporation is 
$1,000, secured by the mining ground and property of 
the company; that the owners of more than two-thirds 
of all the shares of the company vuted in favor of in- 
creasing the btock, 



The Black Hills. — A letter from General 
Custer at Fort Abraham Liocoln, Dakota, 
sharply assails the statement made by 
the Indian Commissioner, in his anneal report 
for stating that there was no indications of 
mineral, etc., in the Black Hiils, Caster as- 
serts that the dispatches of the correspondents 
and explorers on the subject, are accurate; and 
also his own official dispatches, General 
■Sheridan's annual report, Professor Winchell's 
report and various others. He imputes to the 
Commissioner either ignorance or failing less 
excusable, for his statement on the subject. 



In the Chollar-Potosi mine no encouraging 
developments being found in the prospecting 
at the fifth level, work at that point is discon- 
tinued. "The 1100-ft level is being pushed for- 
ward in good style and vigorous and thorough 
prospeoting will be done at that point. 

The new hoisting works of the Woodville 
mine, on the Comstock, have started up and 
operate splendidly. The new shaft will now 
be put down with energy and dispatch, the new 
hoisting works being just what was needed. 



California. 

CALAVERAS COUNTY. 

Rich Steike. — Calaveras ■ Citizen, Jan, 2: 
During last week rich strikes were made in 
claims near Altaville by Cogswell & Nesser, 
and also by "William Hale. Mr. H. has been en- 
gaged for the past four years prospecting in the 
claim where his efforts have at last been 
crowned with success. 

Stkuck It. — Calaveras Chronicle, Jan, 2: We 
hear that gravel has been struck in the claim 
belonging to Judge Shear, located near Central 
hill. The workmen are in close proximity to- 
the blue lead. 

West Point District. — A rich strike was 
made in the 90 ft south level of the Afina Kica 
last Monday night The ore shows Iree gold 
plentifully, and measured, then, four feet in 
width. The Josrphine, also, shows four feet 
of milling ore, a small portion of which is high 
grade. Henry & Son, who bought the old 
I'hoss mill, have nearly completed repairs. 
They intend to overhaul the mill in the spring 
and add first-class improvements. They have 
sufficient ore iu sight, in their mine on Valen- 
tine hill, to keep the mill at work all winter. 
Recently, while work was being done on the 
Bartslo to comply with the U. S. mining laws 
a new and healthy body of ore was discovered 
near the surface. 

Sheep Ranch. — The Wallace & Ferguson 
mine is situated right in the centre of th« town, 
and is worked through a tunnel some 1500 ft in 
length. At equal distances along the line of 
the tunnel three shafts have been sunk, two cf 
which are at present used as hoisting shafts; 
whims being the moiive power. The depth of 
the lower shaft is 93 it; of the upper, 115 ft. 
The vein varies in width from one to two ft, 
the ore paying from $50 to $300 per ion 
through the entire thickness of the lead. The 
company owns a 5-stamp mill, in conjunction 
with Mr. W. I. Armstrong, which is kept run- 
ning night and day on rock from the- mine. The 
Wallace & Ferguson is the only mine work- 
ing in the district at present, if I except the 
Lt-di, which Messrs. Hull and Fisher have just 
started to re-open. The Lodi formerly paid 
fair divideuds, and the gentlemen are very 
sanguine of good results in the future. 
CONTRA COSTA COUNTY. 

The Quicksilver Mine. — Contra Costa 
Gazette, Jan. 2: Since mention of the progress 
of operations by the new company on the old 
Welch quicksilver claim, some four or five 
miles south-east of Clay[on, in our issue of last 
week, we have had a cuacceinterview with Mr. 
Ryan, the superintendent of the new company, 
who informs us that the company is composed 
of persons who have had sufficient mining ex- 
perience to enable them to form a fair judg- 
ment of their chances of sai/wose in *i j— 

taking, and to enable them to endure the 
disappointment should it prove a failnre, 
which, from present favorable indications they 
do not expect. They have expended about 
510,000 up to the present time, aud expect to 
have their furnaces completed and ready for 
smelting by the latter part of February. They 
are running two tunnels for the cinnabar de- 
posit, ihe upper one of which is now in 100 ft, 
and has a little more than 200 feet to go, on the 
calculation made, before striking the ore mass 
for which it is ruuniag. The lower tunnel they 
calculate will touch the ore depo it 300 ft below 
the surface, and will run 500 ft to reach it. 
They have already gathered ready for the fur- 
nace, several hundred tons of rock, a portion 
of which is of low grade but contains quicksilver 
in sufficient quantity to pay for smelting, while 
much of the rock is very rich, and he calcu- 
lates that it will altogether yield very hand- 
somely, though gathered from or near the 
surface. Mr. Ryan seems a very candid man 
of good judgment, and he appears very well 
satisfied that the company have a good pro- 
spect. 

New Hoisting Wobks Engine House. — In 
place of the engine house at the new shaft of 
the Black Diamond Coal aompany, that was 
destroyed by an incendiary fire some eight or 
ten weeks ago, a fine brick building has been 
erected and is now. completed. The damaged 
engines and hoisting drums have been repaired 
or replaced with new work, and it is expecied 
that the machinery will soon be put in opera- 
tion and employed in raising coal through the 
new shaft. The company have also put up a 
new brick building for use as an office at the 
mines. 

INYO COUNTY- 

Panamint Items. — Panamint News, Dec. 29: 
Tbe shaft upon the Wyoming mine is down 
nearly 35 feet (below the graded level, which 
would add 20 feet more), and shows high grade 
ore nearly the whole size of the shaft. We also 
have it from good authority tuat all the mines 
on that side of the canyon are either improving 
or holding their own at every foot sunk. 

New Coso. — Wm. T., better known as Bill 
Grant Came in from New Coso a couple of 
days since, and informs us that several new, 
and, apparently, valuable locations have been 
made there in the last few days. 4.mong others 
is one by J R. Hughes, Martin Mee and the 
aforesaid W. T. Grant, which displays a great 
amount of carbonates, running by actual ass iy 
as follows: silver, 59 ounces per ton; lead 55 



January 9, 1875.] 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



21 



per cent. Armstrong and Carroll, of this [ The owner of the Emma mine, Jacob Cook, is 
place, have also made a promising location. | ruuum : a tunnel into the hill, and haa struck 
Billy Goodwin, in the interest of Belabaw It | some very rich ore. This mine is situated 



Co., of Cerro Oordo, was in oamp, taking a 
view of ihingB. 

Labor in Panahint. — The question "is the 
labor demand in Panuuiiut fully supplied?' may 
be safest to answer in the affirmative; but the 
time is near at baud, we conscientiously be- 
lieve, when at least five times as many pors ns 
as we now have can find profitable employment . 
It should be borne in mind that but a few 
months ago Panamint could be approached 
only upon the backs of aniiu tls and then with 
thegroAtaflt difficulty. Th-* wonder is th it not 
so little but that so much hue been done, and 
that so many bun Ireds now find profitable 
employment where then a bare half dozen 
lonely prospectors sat over their camp-fires and 
held gtim counsel as to wh' n, where and how 
their next supuly of the sheer necessaries of 
life were to be obtained and paid for — millions 
under their feet but not a cent in their pockets!, 
Where, we ask, is there another silver mining 
district on the coast wbich in such a very brief 
period since it was a "bowliug, almost inacces- 
sible wilderness," can, or ever did, make such 
ao actual, substantial display of wealth, popu- 
lation and permaueuoy as this, or make a 
greater return in silver bullion for the work 
done when we consider all the cironmstances— 
the shortness of time and lack of n-urly every 
requisite for successful miuing or even a com- 
fortable existence? We consider Panamint 
without a parallel in actual progress and solid 
merit — and but a line of its great history is yet 
written 
KERN COUNTY. 

Thk railroad at this time would have been 
completed and in running order to a point 21 
miles in advance of the Bakersfield depot but 
for want of iron. This is now going forward. 
Eight truck loads went forward Tue-day, and 
we learn that several lots have passed since, so 
that but little time will elapse belore the rails 
will be laid the distance referred to. No per- 
manent stopping place, however, will be made 
there — only such temporary arrangements as 
may be necessary for the accommodation of the 
Inyo trade. The permanent depot will be 
three miles further on. Intervening some 
deep cuts are to be made. This will be inaiuly 
for the accommodation of Havilah, Keruville, 
the South Fork aud the contiguous miuing re- 
gion. About -.20 miles more will bring the road 
to the summit of Tehactiepi, after which, if it 
is deemed advisable to tap the great ruining 
region beyond more effectually, there are only 
the difficulties of a nearly level plain to con- 
tend with. The great bar to its development 
has hitherto been the necessity of freighting by 
way of Los Angeles, and it is a terrible incubus 
now. This will be removed in a few weeks 
and the mines made of comparatively easy 
acce-s. and withiu a year they will be just as 
accessib.e, as soon as the road surmounts the 
summit, as any part of the State. The good 
time coming is eagerly looked for by the people 
of Kein and Inyo counties. 

LAKE COUNTY. 

Silvee Discoveries. — Bee, Jan. 2: Last week 
William Wil.iams discovered a ledge of ailver- 
beanug rock iu the vicinity of the Highland 
springs On last Tuesday a ledge, supposed to 
be of the same character, was discovered in 
Scott's valley. The parties bave sent samples 
of 'he rock to San Francisco, for assay. 

Gold Quartz Discovery. — James Tyler, of 
Tyler'B ranch, about midway betweeu Lakeport 
and Cloverdale, has discovered a well defined 
ledge of gold-be.inng quartz, on the ridge that 
divides the waters of Russian river and Clear 
lake 
MARIPOSA COUNTY. 

Ca'thay Valley. — Cor. Mariposa Gazette, 
Jan. 2: Cathay's valley is destined to be one of 
the lie -st mining districts in the State. There 
are within the bounds of the valley, 12 quartz 
veins tuat we know prospect in free cold all 
the way from six dollars to 80 dollars per ton 
on different veins. Our outlook is very flatter- 
ing. Mr. Williams, of the Francis mine, is 
talking of building a new quartz mill below the 
Francis mine, of a capacity that will crush all 
the custom quartz that may be taken to his 
mill. When Mr. Williams talks he means busi- 
ness. There is a fair prospect of a quariz mill 
being built in the upper end of the valley the 
coming spring or Bummer, as the present neces- 
sity requires it. A full supply of quartz will 
.be furnished to any company that will first put 
up a mill in the upper end of the valley and 
make fair returns of what the quartz contains. 
Tbe whole valley is a perfect network of quartz 
veins, aud many of them have hidden pay 
shutes on them that will fully pay the prospec 
tors for hunting them. 
NAPA COUNTY. 

New Discovery — St. Helena Star, Dec. 31: 
We are informed that Dr. Michel, Mr. J. J. 
Dickenson, and Mr. Swarts, of Pope valley, 
have located another lode of fine chrome iron 
eight miles from Calistoga, on the route of.the 
road from that place to the Phcenix mine. We 
have a specimen of it now in our office which 
will go over fifty per cent, chrome. The same 
company are working a ledge of chrome iron, 
about eight miles from here, in Mowe's 
canyon. 

The silver mine discovered by Chapman & 
Co. is prospecting well, aud ore is being taken 
out which assays from $20 to $80 a ton. Iu 
the immediate vicinity of the town two more 
claims are being worked for silver ore, and the 
indications are exceedingly favorable. 



Nevada. 



TnnNELTNo.— The CaliBtoga Free Press notes; doubled. 



about two miles, northeast of Calistoga, and 
the ore thus far brought to the surface evidences 
a large amonut of wealth, which only needs 
time and labor to secure abundant riches for 
the owner. 
NEVADA COUNTY. 

Omaha Mine. — Grass Valley Union, Jan. 3: 
Ou the first day of this moutli aud the first day 
of the year, the Omaha struck into extra good 
ore. The rock was rich enough to justify the 
employment oi a reliable guard over the dump 
pile. A man could very easily put thirty or 
forty dollars from that dump pile into his 
vest pocket. We intended last evening to go 
down aud glean but we heard that McFate and 
a shot-gun were on guard, and then we con- 
cluded that to walk two or tliree miles on a 
dark uight is no healthy ex reise. 
S Empiue Mine Bricks.— The Empire mino sent 
a couple of gold bricks below on New Year's 
day, a gift to the stockhold. rs, aud the brioks 
aggregated in value the amount of about $21,- 
000. The Empire, underground, is daily im- 
proving in appearance. It is one of the 
oldest mines iu the district and has bottom as 
well as a good decree of speed. 

Yesterday waB pay day tor the Idaho mine. 
Tbe miners found the money ready for them 
at Fmdley's bank. The Idaho pa\s off every 
mouth quite a little army of men— good men 
at ihat. 

The Darmouth mill started up yesterday 
moruing and was stamping gold out of cement 
at last accounts. The mine is yielding plenty of 
the cement to keep the mill constantly going. 

The Mining Situation, — The Gras Valley 
mines have done well during the past month, 
and some of them make a good showing for 
the year. There are, however, too many idle 
mines in the district — mines that only await 
drills and picks and gads and powder, and 
other appliances, including pluck and muscle 
to cause them to show the " bonanza." Dur- 
ing the month just passed a great improvement 
over the month be'ore has been shown here, 
and that was because more work was doue, in a 
prospecting way last month than in November. 
There is no doubt but that when work is done 
in this district pay is sure to follow. That has 
proved true more than a thousand times. 

SANTA CLARA COUNTY. 

Almaden. — iSau Jose Mercury December 31: 
The New Almaden Quicksilver Mining com- 
pany has been making some extensive im- 
provements at Hacienda. A new smelting fur- 
nace of new manufacture and entirely different 
from anyihing else of the kind now in use in 
the United States, has been put up and arrange- 
ments are now being made for the erection of 
still another of the same kind. The old fur- 
naces will uot be discarded but will be kept in 
use aud worked to their fullest capacity. New 
and large condensers are also being constructed, 
and such other works as are needdd for the de- 
velopment of the mine. The company givea 
employment to a young army of men. 

SISKIYOU COUNTY. 

Scott River Ditch. — Yreka Union, Dec. 30: 
We learu that. Job Garretson has surveyed and 
located a mile aud a half or two miles of the 
new Scott river ditch, and that a Chinese com- 
pany have offered to dig that part of the ditch 
for $7 a rod. He has written below to the offi- 
cers of the company, and will not let the con- 
tract till he shall receive an answer. 

The Hooper Ledge. — Cornish & Co. continue 
to drive their lower tunnel on the Hooper ledge. 
They think they are now within from 20 to 40 ft 
of the pay chute. In the meantime, while they 
have been running tuis tunnel which has now 
occupied several months, they have been taking 
rich rock from their shaft. The tunnel they 
are now running will strike the ledge about 300 
ft from the surface. The rock heretofore 
taken from this claim has been very rich, and 
the owners are sanguine that there is still much 
more equally rich to be taken out. We trust 
their most sanguine anticipations may be real- 
ized. 

W. A. Little, of Oak Bar, was in town a few 
days the fore part of this week. From him we 
learn that there will probably be more claims 
opened on the Klamath next season at Oak 
Bar, and between that point and the mouth of 
Scott river, than ever before. On that portion 
of the river there has been a good deal of pros- 
pecting done the present season with very en- 
couraging results. 
TRINITY COUNTY. 

Another Cinnabar Discovery. — Trinity 
Journal, Jan. 2: An 8 inch vein of cinnabar has 
beeu found in toe bed-rock in the Wolff Placer 
mine, on Canon cieek. The ledge is well de- 
fined, and the work already done gives indica- 
tions that it is extensive. A location has been 
made, and ore is now being taken out. Some 
specimens of the ore and casings brought to 
Weaverville by J. E. Driver, and left at Hart- 
mau's, are very rich, and show a large percent- 
age of quicksilver by practical testa. 
TUOLUMNE COUNTY. 

The Riverside.— Souora Betnoerat, Jan. 2: 
This mine is making handsome returns, and 
from what we learn will prove very profitable. 
It lias been opened to an extent that develops a 
large quantity of paying ore, and the explora- 
tion is increasing the amount in sight daily. 
On Mouday the result of 8 days' crushing was 
brought to town in the shape of a bar of solid 
gold weighing 112 ounces. The ore averages to 
yield two ounces of gold to the ton. When the 
10 additional stamps are in motion, which will 
be in a few days, the amount taken out will be 



WASHOE DISTRICT. 

Crown Point, Gull Hill News, Deo. 30: 
Daily yield, about (100 tons, from the old ore 
Motions, from the 600 to the 1500ft levels, in- 
clusive. The stopes aud breasts are looking 
about as usual. Some very good ore is now 
comiug from the north portion of the 1500-ft 
level, and the ore at that depth seeming to hold 
out best to thenonhward. Both cross-cuts at 
this level are still iu porphyry, and are being 
driven nh 'ad to find another bonanza iu that 
direction, if possible. 

Justice.— The main west drift from the Wal- 
ler Defeat is still driving ahead in excellent 
ledge matter; it is, however, being pushed for- 
ward to form a connection with the fourth sta- 
tion of the main Justice shaft, without present 
regard to the development of the ore vein. 
When this connection is completed, every fa- 
cilitv will be afforded for opening out the ore 
developments of this important level by cross- 
cutting, etc. 

Kossuth.— Shaft now down 355 ft. Sinking 
deeper is suspended fir a few days in order to 
open out the station for the 350-ft level. ProB- 
pecting at the 20U-ft revel goes ahead as usual 
with good indications. 

Gould & Cobry.— Good progress is being 
made in the double incline winze, designed to 
connect the 1500 with the 1700-ft level. It will 
reach the 1700-ft level within the ensuing five 
days. The several drifts and cross-cuts through- 
out the miue are being pushed forward with 
great energy. 

Julia.— Main shaft down 1120 ft, with no 
water to interfere. The ground is soft and 
clayey, with occasional streaks of quartz, indi- 
cating a ledge near by. The main south drift 
at the 1000-ft level is driven ahead at the rate 
of three feet per day. 

Sierra Nevada.— The water in the new shaft 
being well reduced, sinking deeper is now goina 
ahead at a lively rate, in good working ground. 
Good ore developments are being made in the 
old Sacramento chimney. The best portion of 
this mine is evidently at the north end, near 
the Phil Sheridan line. 

California.— Cross-cuts Nos. 2 and 3, run- 
ning east on the 1500-foot level, are making 
rapid progress toward the ore body. Cross- 
cut No. 2, near the southern boundary, has 
already penetrated the ore body to a distance 
of 100 feet. The quality of the ore disclosed 
in this drift is, for its entire length, of very 
high grade. The " C & C " joint shaft is sunk 
to a depth of 35 feet, and the hoisting works 
building erected over the same is nearly com- 
pleted. Its dimensions are 60x60 feet. The 
giound is very favorable for sinking. The 
hoisting machinery is now being erected, aud 
will be running by the second of January. 

Consolidated Virginia.— Daily yield, 400 
tons. On the 1550 foot level the north drift 
has entered into the ground of the California 
mine, and is in excellent ore, as are likewise 
the east cross-cut near the north line, and the 
winze sinking below this level. On the 1500- 
foot level, cross-cuts Nos 1 and 2 are still pro- 
gressing eastward in ore of the very highest 
grade. The upper ore breasts on the 1300 and 
1400-foot levels are looking splendidly. The 
new mill will commence reducing ore from the 
big bonanza within two days from the date of 
this report. 

Imperial Empire.— The face of the drift at 
the 2000-foot level is getting into the west wall 
of the ledge, and is being pushed ahead slowly, 
with all due caution, and kept securely tim- 
bered in case of any sudden and extra rush of 
water or other emergency. The winze from 
the level above, continues in good ore. 

Dayton. — Daily yield, 60 tolls. The ore 
sections toward the Kossuth show continued 
improvement in quality, and promise to yield 
well for some time to come. 

Belcher.— Daily yield, 450 tons, from the 
old ore levels down to the 1400-foot. The 
three winzes below that level are showing well 
and the prospect is that the 1500-foot will open 
out good. The drift east from the main in- 
cline at this level is in 56 feet. The south 
winze on the 1300-foot level is in very good ore, 
and is down 23 feet from the surface, and is 
raised upon from the 850-foot level 127 feet. 
This mine is looking better generally than it 
was at last report, and is good for more divi- 
dends yet. 

Chollah-Potosi.— Daily yield 55 tons from 
the old workings, the car sample assays of 
wbich average $32 per ton. 

Florida.— The main drift west, at the 300- 
foot level is in 55 feet to-day, with the face in 
very favorable looking material, with stringers 
of quartz giving low assays. 

Ophir.— Daily yield, 250 tons. The average 
bullion yield of the ore is constantly on the in- 
crease, owing to the better quality as well as 
quantity extracted. The ore breasts of the 
1165-ft level especially are looking.and yielding 
splendidly. The northeast winze at this level 
continues down through ore of the richest 
quality, and the cross-cut 33 feet below this 
level is also in rich ore. Both cross-cuts in 
the 1465-ft level are being driven ahead in very 
favorable material, and cross-cutting east is 
commenced at the 1700-ft level. So far as de- 
veloped the great bonanza is found to extend 
north into the Ophir ground about 300 ft, with 
every indication of further continuance. 

Phil Sheridan. — The main west drift is to- 
dav in 179 ft. The entire face of the drift is 
now in hard rock, principally quartz, which 
gives good assays occasionally. Mining men 
and experts who have seen it pronounce it 
good, and a rich development may be looked 
for at any moment. 



Occidental.— The three cross-cuts now be- 
ing made from the upraise between the upper 
and lower levels'are all in a fair quality of mill- 
ing ore. These drifts have penetrated the ore 
body for distances of from 12 to 55 ft. The 
last mentioned distance is the width of the ore 
body iu the upper cross-drifts, 100 ft below 
the upper tunnel. The two lowest cross-cuts, 
at intervals of 100 ft respectively below the 
first cross-cut', have not yet passed through the 
ore. 

Globe Consolidated. — Main wes drift driven 
ahead as usual. Good bunches of quartz con- 
tinue to be met with occasionally, giving good 
promise of eventually leading to something 
better. 

Utah.— On the 400- ft level the drifts running 
in the ore vein are progressing rapidly. Cross- 
cuts will be started by day after to-morrow in 
the ore vein on this level. 

Yellow Jacket —The north drift at the 
1740-ft level is in 165 feet, and Is now running 
in heavy ground, requiring retimberihg. The 
east cross-cut from the drilt is in 168 ft, 100 ft 
of which is in the ledge matter. The face of 
all the drifts are in porphyry and quartz. 

Silver Hill.— The drlts both north and 
south at the third level are running in excellent 
looking vein matter. The north drift of the 
second level is also showing well in quartz. 

American Flat.— The drifts at the 450 and 
750-ft levels still show improvement in their 
face. Both this and the Baltimore mine are 
encumbered considerably by water, and the 
heavy new hoisting and pumping works being 
erected to work both jointly are much needed. 
Overman.— The 1100-ft station for a drift to 
the ledge is opeued, and drifting commenced. 
Sinking at the bottom of the main shaft is 
about being resumed. 

Lady Bryan.— Cross-cutting for the ledge 
progresses well, and it will be reached some 
time next week. 

Caledonia. — Excellent progress is being 
made with the drifts at the 1000-ft level, both 
north and east, also with the drifting at the 
1076-ft level. The south drift at the 980-ft 
level Bhows fine looking quartz in its face. 

Dardanelles.— Face of the east drift still in 
fine looking quartz with occasional spots which 
give good assays. It is evident that the com- 
pany should sink deeper, present prospects 
giving ample encouragement for so doing. 

Rook Island. — Winze down 59 feet, and still 
in fine looking vein matter with spots of good 
ore. Sinking the main shaft deeper is resumed. 
New York Consolidated. — Excellent pro- 
gress is being made in sinking the shaft, and 
very flatteriug indications are being passed 
through, occasional streaks of low-grade ore 
being met with. 

Savage. — Sinking the main incline deeper 
progresses very favorably and drifting at the 
2200-ft level is going ahead, with no important 
change to report. 

Hale & Nororobs.— Daily yield, 85 tons, 
principally from the eighth station level. 
North drift aud west cross-cut at the 2100-ft 
level making their usual progress, with no new 
development. The various cross-cuts at the 
2000ft level have not yet reached the west wall 
of the vein. 

Suooor. — Main drift at the 550-ft level driv- 
ing ahead, with face in quartz and porphyry. 
Indications show close proximity to tbe ledge. 
Pictou. — The rock in the face of the main 
tunnel has become mucn softer, being por- 
phyry with considerable clay, allowing of faster 
progress. 

Original Gold Hill.— The face of both 
drifts at the 340-ft level are now in low grade 
ore and looking well. 

Senator. — Favorable bunches of quartz con- 
tinue to be met with in drifting along the vein 
at the 400-ft level. 

Sdiro. — Tunnel driving ahead at a lively rate 
and now in 807 feet from the old Utah shaft. 
Face in low-grade ore. 

New York. — The good indications in the 250 
and 700-ft levels still continue, and the drifts 
go ahead as usual. 

Mexican.— Drift from the 1465-ft level of the 
Ophir going ahead as usual. No change. 



The Empress, one of the oldest locations on 
American Flat, which has been lying for years 
undeveloped, now is in the hands of parties 
who are able and willing to find out what its 
real merits call for. Work is once more re- 
sumed upon it, and the old Bhaft is being 
cleaned out and re-timbered, preparatory to 
sinking deeper. The 2Veu>ssays that the ground 
about the top of the shaft is being- graded off 
for efficient hoisting works, the machinery for 
which is engaged and will soon arrive. 



The Gould & Curry.— The report of the 
treasurer of this mine for the last fiscal year 
showB that four assessments had been made, 
aggregating $310,713.29. Other items had 
swelled the receipts to $328,224.54. For the 
sale of assaying materials $66 was. received; for 
hoisting ores and rock, $5,751.50. The cash 
indebtedness on the 30th was $61,838.15; cost 
of insurance, labor and materials, $235,598.08; 
general expenses, salaries, etc., $19,502.15; 
minor expenditures, legal fees, etc., $45,796. 



In ihe Crown Point mine two new levels, 
one and two hundred ft below the present low- 
est working level will be opened before long, 
giving plenty of room for the ore vein, whioh 
Is somewhat contracted at the 1500-ft level, to 
widen out into a comfortable continuation of 
the great bonanza, which haa yielded bo many 
millions thus far. 



22 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



[January g, 1875. 



Jute. 

This is undoubtedly one of the products des- 
tined to figure in the programme of diversified 
farming, in California. Although some attention 
has been given to this matter during the last 
two yearB, it may still be ranked among agri- 
cultural experiments. We have endeavored to 
"draw out" those who are experimenting in the 
culture of jute, and have them communicate 
the results through the Press. But very little 
practical knowledge, it is evident, has yet been 
secured, and those who possess that little are 
quite uncommunicative on the subject. Judg- 
ing from the extent and character of the inquiries 
received by us concerning jute, and the diffi- 
culty in obtaining the desired information, we 
are convinced that the growth' of interest in 
the matter is increasing much faster than that 
of the plant itself. 

In Southern agriculture the subject occupies 
precisely the same position as with us. The 
farmers there are making the same efforts to 
curtail the proportions of the cotton product, 
that we are using to reduce those of the wheat 
crop. Among the means by which they hope 
to effect this curtailment, the cultivation of 
- jute figures conspicuously; more so than with 
us. The Jute company of New Orleans has 
been in active operation for some time, and is 
using every means to induce planters to sub- 
stitute, in a measure, this crop for that of cot- 
ton, and to place the material before the manu- 
facturers of the country. The President of 
this company a short time since sent to the 
Department of Agriculture at Washington, 
specimens of jute and its fabrics raised and 
manufactured in Louisiana. They consisted 
of jute filament, rolled, after cleaning by ma- 
chinery; jute rope, crude as it comes from the 
machine; and jute rope made of "rotted jute. 
The President stated that the jute was acknowl-' 
edged to be 50 per cent, superior to the Indian 
article. A planter, writing from North Caro- 
lina, says that the ground was prepared as for 
cotton, and the seed dropped twelve inches 
apart; and, as the spring was a very wet one, 
the seed lay dormant for three weeks. The 
plant grew to a height of thirteen feet, with 
branches from five to seven feet long. The 
land was ploughed twice, and hoed once. It 
was cut in October and thrown into water, 
where it remained to rot three weeks; the bark 
was then easily stripped from bottom to top. A 
specimen of the fibre was exhibited at the State 
fair, and pronounced very fine by persons who 
were familiar with its culture. Bottom lands 
of North Carolina could be made, it is affirmed, 
to produce, by manuring, as much as 3000 
pounds per acre. A planter in Georgia, also, 
who has succeeded well in an experiment in 
raising jute, says that if five cents per pound 
can be netted, more can be made by raising jute 
than cotton. He planted about May 1; the 
seed germinated freely, and the plants grew 
finely on rather poor land, attaining a height 
of over ten feet by September 19. 

The attention of England is already directed 
to the impetus given to jute culture in this 
country. Although they declare that there are 
no indications that this fibre will be raised in 
the United Slates to an extent that will jeopar- 
dize the prosperity of the jute industry of 
Bengal — the main source of jute supply for 
England— the consideration of the subject has 
induced the Government in India to appoint a 
commission to inquire into the culture, etc., of 
the jute plant. They were evidently incited to 
this by the superiority of the American product, 
and with the characteristic willingness of Eng- 
lishmen to acknowledge manifest superiority, 
and the unwillingness to play second to any- 
body in anything, they instituted a thorough 
investigation of the subject. 

The report submitted by this commission is 
complete in every respect; containing much 
information that will be extremely interesting 
to those who are simply curious in the matter, 
and deserving the careful consideration of 
those who view the subject from the commer- 
cial and manufacturing stand points; while 
those who wish to embark in its culture will be 
able to obtain from it many points of practical 
utility. We therefore give the following syn- 
opsis of the report, as published in a recent 
number of the British Trade Journal: 

"As to the origin of the word jute, concern- 
ing which there has been so much dispute,- it is 
suggested that the modern word is simply the 
Anglicised form of the Oriss&jhot, and the an- 
cient Sanskrit jhat. As to the preeise plant 
which yields the fiber, the commission has 
showu that the jute of commerce id yielded in- 
differently by two distinct species of Tilacece,' 
the Corchorous oliotorius and Chorchorus capsu- 
laris. The plants are extremely alike in ap- 
pearance, leaf, color, and growth, and differ 
only in their seed-pods, those of the 0. capsu- 
laris being Bhort; globular, and wrinkled, 
while those of C. oliotorius are the thickness of 
a quill, and about two inches long. Both 
plants are annual, and grow from five to ten 
feet high, with a stalk about the thickness of 
a man's finger, seldom branching except near 
the top. The leaves, which are of a light green 
color and serrated, are four or five inches long, 
and taper to a point. Several other species of 
the same plant are s^id to yield jute, but are 
not cultivated for the fiber, the species already 
named alone yielding the real jute. This fact 
was established by the commission, by a series 
of experiments in the Royal Botanical Gardens 
with seeds obtained from all the districts in 
whieh the fiber is grown. The results showed 
that the jute of commerce is the produce of 



one or the other of the two plants named, and 
of them only. 

In lower Bengal, the two species appear to 
be grown indifferently; but in the central and 
some of the eastern districts, the G. capsularis 
largely predominates, while in the neighbor- 
hood of Calcutta it is the 0. olitorius that is 
chiefly cultivated. The well known Lukhipore 
jute of Hooghly and 4he 24-Pergunnahs, known 
also as desi jute, is the produce of this latter 
species. The plant has been cultivated from 
time immemorial in the lower provinces, but 
its export is a modern industry, although the 
fiber has been cultivated largely for home use. 
and for the manufacture of gunny from a very 
remote period. One or other of the two plants 
has been found in no lesB than forty-seven 
out of the fifty-eight districts of the Presidency. 
The attention of the Commission was specially 
directed by the Government to the importance 
of ascertaining what description of soil was 
most favorable to the growth of the fiber. The 
evidence collected upon the point is conflict- 
ing. A light sandy soil is not suited to it, and 
it seems most to flourish in a hot, damp at- 
mosphere, with a heavy rainfall and rich allu- 
vial soil. The seasons of sowing and growing 
appear to be generally the same as those for 
the early rice crop of Bengal. The oftener and 
more thoroughly the land is plowed, and the 
more manure, the better. The seed is sown 
broadcast from the middle or end of March to 
the beginning of June, and the plant cut from 
the middle of August to the middle of October, 
and in some of the districts earlier. The Com- 
mission direct prominent attention to the ex- 
treme carelessness of the cultivators in the se- 
lection of the seed. In most instances a cor- 
ner of the field, or a few stunted wayside 
plants are left to produce it, not the slightest 
attempt being made to select it; and if in these 
circumstances a real detonation of the plant 
had taken place, a fact which the commission 
doubt, little wonder could have'been expressed. 
Neither selection nor change of seed seems to 
be resorted too, and if the attention of the 
Government is ever directed to improving the 
cultivation of this plant, its first step must be 
a reform in this fundamental point of good 
husbandry. The acreage under jute in the 
great producing season of 1872 was 921,000. 
The area is said to have been no more than 
517,000 acres in 1873. The northern and east- 
ern districts may also be said to engross the 
cultivation, showing a total area of 800,000 
acres under the plant in 1872, against 125,000 
only in , the rest of the Presidency. The sug- 
gestions of the improvement of the staple are 
confined to the selection of" the seed, to th6 
observance of a more careful rotation in grow- 
ing the crop, and to the improvement of the 
processes for cutting and steeping the fiber. 
The influence of the cultivation on the condi- 
tion of the people appears to have been good. 
The testimony is uniform that it has enriched 
the cultivators, while the deleterious effects of 
the manufacture upon their health seems to be 
very problematic. As to an alleged deteriora- 
tion of the staple, the commission attribute 
this belief to the fact that the high prices which 
have prevailed of late years have stimulated the 
production of large quantities of inferior or 
badly-prepared jute. It is not that there is 
less good jute produced than formerly, but 
that a larger proportion of inferior fiber grown 
on any and every soil has. come into the mar- 
ket under the stimulus of prices; and that 
when the quantity grown is large the care de- 
voted to its preparation is comparatively small. 
The commission record their judgment that 
there is nothing to show that there has Ueen 
any deterioration, in se, in the character of the 
jute, or any general falling off in the quality of 
the fiber. The local manufactures of the fiber 
into cordage and twine, and into gunny cloth, 
and gunny bags, are described in their report 
at length; and the commission have shown that 
it is used for paper-making in several districts. 



The Omaha Mine. — In a review of the min- 
ing situation at Grass Valley, the Union speaks 
as follows of the Omaha mine: It is situated 
south of Grass Valley on Wolf creek, and 
about three miles distaut from the town. It is 
owned by an incorporated company, which has 
its principal place of business at Sacramento. 
Sixteen miners are at present employed and 
§3 per day per miner are paid. The cost of 
sinking so far per foot has been $25. The cost 
of drifting per foot has been $10, and the cost 
of stoping per ton has been $6. The cost of ex- 
tracting ore per ton has been about $10 and the 
cost of milling the ore per ton has been $3 50. 
The milling is done at a custom mill. The 
number of tons which have been worked is 100, 
and gave an average yield of $21 per ton. The 
the percentage of sulphurets is about 1.5. The 
to tal bullion product has been $2 , 500. 
The length of the locution is 1400 feet and the 
course of the ledga is north and south, with a 
dip to the west at an angle of 32 degrees. The 
length of the pay zone as far as explored is 170 
feet, and the vein has an average thickness of 
15 inches. The country rock is serpentine. 
The work is done through a shaft which is 260 
feet deep. The ledge in the bottom of the shaft 
is fully three feet thick and shows free gold in 
great quantities besides good sulphurets and 
general good quality of rock. The walls of 
the ledge are well defined and smooth. Two 
levels have been opened and these are, together, 
of the length of 255 feet. The hoisting works 
are run by water power and cost $1,500. M. 
Dodsworth is the Superintendent. 

Dbyino Up. — In Trinity county everything 
is said to be drying up, and both miners and 
farmers are anxiously looking for rain, 



Panamint District, 

The Inyo Independent says: During a recent 
visit to Panamint we took occasion to make as 
thorough an examination oi a number of its 
ledges as could be done in" three, days climb- 
ing, and by hammering croppings at short in- 
tervals from the beginning of one location, 
though step by step, to the next and the next. 
The result of this persistent hammering and 
breaking rock was to prove conclusively that 
there is scarcely a point in all that vast range 
of exposed quartz where "metal" in fair quan- 
tities, varying from a "color" to $2,000 to the 
ton, cannot be found. It appears as though 
there was no portion of the croppings in the 
limestone formation that was not more or less 
impregnated with mineral. Nor is there an 
opening anywhere that does not show a pay 
streak of a few inches in width of very high 
grade ore. 

As our examinations extended over several 
miles of croppings, with almost uniform re- 
sults wherever broken into, no matter how un- 
promising in outward appearance, we conclude 
that there is enough near surface ore close to 
Surprise canyon to maintain quite a city for a 
half a dozen years or more to come. There 
need be no fear on this point. But it is pro- 
phesied by White Piners and others, that since 
the best and greater portion of the mines lie in 
limestone the bottom will soon be reached — 
that no pay ore will be found at any consider- 
able depth. . Such may be the case, but there 
is no reason obvious to a common understand- 
ing why it should. On the contrary, it would 
seem to be an almost absolute certainty that 
the pay ore runs down to immense depths. 
There can be no question that these are true 
fissure veins; they may be divided into two 
distinct veins; the mother vein, on the north 
side of the canyon, known as the Jacob and 
Stewart's Wonder, cuts straight across deep 
gulches and lofty hills for at least a mile and a 
half, with scarcely a break in its whole length. 
The only perceptible difference in the pros- 
pect, whether made at the lowest point of de- 
pression or the highest elevation. The same 
is true of the other grand vein, which, from 
its most nottd location may be called the Wyo- 
ming series. This lies on the opposite side of 
the canyon, with which and the Wonder ledge 
it rnns nearly parallel, but at a greater alti- 
tude. This ledge is cut down at least a thou- 
sand feet deep in one place, and about half as 
deep in several others. It cuts far into the 
slate on tbe east, the only portion that appears 
to be barren, and extends over two miles south- 
westerly, across deep gulches, through the 
lime, into still another formation. 

Branching from it are numerous ledges, all 
large and showing high grade ores, these in 
turn cutting across hill and gulch a mile down 
to the main canyon itself. Counting these nu- 
merous spurs, the connections of which are 
easily traced, this mother vein .exposes several 
miles of the very richest croppings. At the 
lowest depth yet attained, which is on the 
Wyoming, and is about fifty feet, we saw rock 
taken which assayed $915 to the ton, and there 
was apparently plenty of it. The next lowest, 
about twenty feet, on the Esperanza, a large 
spur or cross ledge, there was about a foot^ of 
$325 rock. These are fair average assays of the 
pay streak proper -in hundreds of openings 
throughout the district. The same openings 
show from ten to twenty times as much ore 
which will probably average $50 to the ton — a 
class of ore which, with proper facilities, can 
be worked with fair profit. Outside of these 
two veins are numerous other locations, none 
of which we saw, but one or two of which, if 
no more, are said to be quite as promising as 
the best of the series. One of these is the 
Sunrise, lying in the slate, and possibly the 
eastern extension of the Wyoming. The Sun- 
rise is the only prominent mine yielding free 
milling ores — all chlorides. But lack of space 
forbids any notice in detail of even the most 
prominent locations of the dristrict. , 

Owing to the nature of the ground, the town 
site of Panamint is somewhat circumscribed, but 
much less so tban is commonly reported. 
There is room there for a city of at least 10,- 
000 without uncomfortable crowding. Its 
present population, all classes, will approxi- 
mate 1,500. The business of the place, outside 
of mining, consists nearly of restaurants, 
stores and saloons. There is a present suffi- 
ciency of them. There are inducements for 
the establishment of some other branches, par- 
ticularly a good hotel, one of which, however, 
will soon be ready for business. 

As soon as the concentrating mills are put in 
operation, which will require at least three 
months yet, there will be a demand for many 
more miners, mechanics and common laborers, 
but at present there is quite enough. 

The Surprise Yalley Mill and Water company 
have done an immense amount of work, cut- 
ting roads and other permanent improvements, 
and are now but just beginning to do some sys- 
tematic mining. They will soon have their 
principal mines opened at half a dozen levels 
each, and find bottom and prove them almost 
the finest mines ever seen. Ton after tons 
of Hercules powder is being used in these open- 
ings, blasting being neeessary at every step. 
The reports from these blasts reverberate and 
fairly ring in the echo, sounding as full and 
loud" as a heavily charged 24-pounder. The 
company have already expended nearly $1,000,- 
000, and expect to expend about half as much 
more before they get fairly to mining and re- 
ducing ores. Numerous other companies are 
preparing for operations on a large scale, and 
altogether the future of Panamint is exceed- 



ingly promising. It will -afford a. great basis 
f ir stock operations ; in this it will hardly 
stand second to the Oomstock itself. Some 
thirty incorporations are preparing for legiti- 
mate mining, but no doubt with the ulterior 
view of running "adits" in the San Francisco 
Stock Board as soon as their mines can be 
made to give them a reliable base. 



The Eureka Mine, 

From an article in'the Grass Valley Union 
we take the following concerning the Eureka 
mine, situated about two miles east of Grass 
Valley, which employed during the year, the av- 
erage of 80 miners. The wages of theBe have 
been $3 per day to the man. The cost of 
sinking, per foot, in exploring has been about 
$65, while the cost of drifting has been about 
$25 per foot. The cost of '-'stoping" has been 
about $10.50 per ton of ore. Milling the ore costs 
$2.61 per ton; the company owning its own 
mill. The number of tons extracted and 
worked during the year is 8,130, the aver-' 
age yield of which has been $25 per ton. The 
percentage of sulphurets in the rock amounts 
to 1.5. The total bullion product has been, for 
the year, about $205,780. The Eureka's loca- 
tion is 1,680 feet, for which the company has a 
patent. The course of the ledge is nearly east 
and west, and the dip is towards the south. 
The length of the pay zone is about 1,000 feet, 
with a ledge of four feet in thickness. The 
country rock is slate and serpentine. The 
mine is worked through a shaft, which has a 
total depth of 1,250 feet. There are eight 
levels opened, and the total length of drifts is 
9,000 feet. The cost of the hoisting works is 
$48,000. At the mill a sixty horse power en- 
gine is in use, and the number of stamps is 30, 
each of which weighs 850 pounds. These are 
dropped, each, 65 times per minute, and the 
drop is ten inches. There are two pans and two 
sulphuret concentrators in the mill. The cost 
of the mill was $30,000, and is capable of crush- 
ing 65 tons of ore in 24 hours. The sulphurets 
are treated by the chlorination process. All 
the stamps of the mill have not been employed 
during the year. The lower portions of the 
mine do not show good pay rock, but explora- 
tions which are now going on may result in 
something good. The Eureka went into oper- 
ation October 1st, 1865, and up to and inclu- 
ding the 30th of September, 1874, had taken 
out bullion to the value of $4,273,148,40. Dur- 
ing that time it paid dividends to the amount 
of $2,054,000. On the 1st of October, 1874, 
the company had on hand in cash and value of 
supplies the sum of $101,646.73, which will en- 
able them to explore the ledge to a much lower 
depth than has yet been reached. Mr. Wm. 
Watt is the Superintendent of the mine, with 
Mr. James Gluy as Foreman. 

Lively Times on the Comstock. 

Notwithstanding, says the Virginia City 
Chronicle, that the present is tbe dull season, 
there is an unprecedented demand for houses. 
Small tenement dwellings are scarcely to be 
had at any price, and rents are rapidly advanc- 
ing. Lodging house keepers have applications 
daily for rooms that they cannot fill, and the 
ingress of emigrants from the East still in- 
creases. The reputation of the Comstock still 
continues, and Eastern papers are filled with 
sneering remarks concerning the recent rich 
discoveries, which are compared to the bogus 
diamond wedding, which lately took place in 
Brazil. People east of the Mississippi have 
but very little idea of mining, and many are of 
the opinion that silver comeB out in solid 
chunks and that silver bars are cutout bodily 
in the interior of the earth. However, Nevada 
does not depend on the East for the sinews of 
trade. Silver and gold is currency itself, and 
it is not necessary to hunt for a market, as is 
the case with any other product. As a natural 
result a mining community is the most inde- 
pendent in the world, and as long as the resi- 
dents of Virginia City have beneath their feet 
millions of dollars in" silver ore, they can afford 
to keep their own counsel and pay no atten- 
tion to the incredulity of the novices of East- 
ern States. 

The new shaft on the dividing line between 
the California and Consolidated Virginia mines 
is already down a depth of twenty feet. The 
ground on the surface is being graded off for 
some distance about the mouth of the shaft, 
and preparations are being made to put up 
hoisting works which will contain a seventy 
horse-power engine. 

The owners of mining locations are busily 
engaged all over the State in doing work to 
keep their claims good, while others are keep- 
ing themselves in reserve to make re-locations 
of eligible properties as soon as the first of 
January arrives. There will undoubtedly be 
many conflicts over mines which different par- 
ties are preparing to jump. 

From present indications the new mill of the 
Consolidated Virginia will be started up within 
the next fortnight. Steam was turned on yes- 
terday. An inspection showB that the machin- 
ery is the finest in the State. Wben its sixty 
stamps start upon ore from the new bonanza, 
the results will be satisfactory to all concerned. 
There is talk of building a new mill by the Cal- 
ifornia company in the same neighborhood. 



PapebBaebels. — The paper barrel business 
seems likely to amount to something. A man- 
ufactory is being erected in Rochester which 
will turn out six hundred barrels a day. They 
are much lighter and more durable than wooden 
parrels, and take very well with the public. 



January 9, 1875.] 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



23 



Qood H E 4 L TH' 



Wet and Dry Bathing. 

If any one in these days will exercise in the 
Dpcn air, so that each day he will perspire 
mod'-rately, and if he will wear thin under 
garments, or none at nil, and sleep in a cold 
room, the functions of the skin will suflVr little 
or no impediment, if water is withheld for 
montbB. Indeed, bathing is not the only way 
in which its healthful action can be maintained 
by those living under the conditions at present 
axitUing. Dry friction over the whole surface 
of the body, onoe a day, or once in two days, 
[s often of more sorvice than tho application of 
water. 

The reply of the centenarian to the inquiry 
to what habit of life he attributed hi* good 
heal h and extreme longevity, ih it he believed 
it due to 'rubbing hininelf all over with a cob 
Tery night,' is significant of an important 
truth. If invalids and persons of low vitality 
would use dry friction and Dr. Franklin's 'air 
bath,' every day for a considerable period, we 

e confident they would often be greatly bene- 
fited. Cleanliness is next to godliness, no 
doubt, and a proper and judicious use of water 
is to be commended; but human being* are 
not amphibious. Nature indicates that the 
functions of the skin should be kept in order 
mainly by muscular exercise, by exciting 
natural perspiration by labor; and, delicious as 
is the bath aud healthful, under proper regula- 
tion, it is no substitute for that exercise of the 
body, without whioh all the functions become 
abnormal. 



Care of the Ear — The Scientific American 
thinks tbat tbe ear is quite as liable to injury 
from drafts of air as from cold water. Tbe 
modern style of cutting the bair in mOD. and 
of arranging the hair of women Is much to be 
deprecated, oeoause it was iutended by nature 
that tho hair should fall over the ear, aud thus 
form a protection to it. But as we caunot 
throw dowu so great a goddess as fashion, we 
uiu*t use care and artificial means for the pre- 
servation of this delicate organ. If sittiug in a 
drift is unavoidable, the handkerchief should 
be applied to the ear exposed, or a pledget of 
cotton inserted within it. The ordinary man- 
ner of washing the face does no barm to the 
ear, because the canal leading to the drum of 
the ear is partly occlud-d by wax, aud water 
does not penetrate far; but all swabbing of the 
ear, whether with dry cloth or lint moistened 
with hot or cold water, or other fluid, is by no 
means to be advised, as it removes the wax, 
the necessary safeguard to the internal ear. 



Ewbot op Imagination. — A young man 
walked into au Indianapolis drug store the 
other day, and called for fifty cents' worth of 
strychnine. The clerk, suspecting his object, 
gave him a harmless dose of sugar of milk. 
The youth swallowed it at onco and sat down 
to die. To the surprise of the clerk, he soon 
showed every indication of poisoning, and he 
thinks that had he not told him of the harmless 
nature of the potion, he would have died from 
mere imagination. 



Poisoned Confectionery. — A gloom was re- 
cently thrown over the town of Placefield, 
Conn., by the death of a twelve-year old 
daugbter of Mr. Edward Markland. The im- 
mediate cause of her demise was the eating of 
candy in which there was arsenic. Some three 
weeks ago the girl in company with two girls 
named respectively Miss Bunnell and Miss 
HemmiDgway, attended an evening party, at 
which, by way of entertainment, was offered 
confectionery purchased in the town of Forrest- 
ville. a portion of which was originally manu- 
factured in the city of New Haven. They par- 
took heartily of the same and soon after were 
taken violently sick. The sufferers were at- 
tended by Dr.- Woodward of this place, who, on 
examining the symptoms, pronounced the 
poison to be arsenic, and that it was contained 
in the candy. Under his*treatmeut the two 
last named girls were partially restored to 
health, though they are not yet considered out 
of danger. But with Miss Markland the case 
was different. Medicine seemed to have no 
healing effect upon her. Previous to death 
she literally suffered many deaths. Her tongue 
became frightfully swollen, and some time be- 
fore she breathed her last inflammation seized 
upon her eyes and rendered her totally blind. 
During it all the little creature was perfectly 
conscious, and patiently endured the most ex- 
cruciating pains till death brought relief. 

A Singular Case. — The Chicago physicians 
are puzzled by Michael Fionegan, a patient in 
one of their hospitals, During more than two 
months he has lain rigidly in bed, seldom mov- 
ing a m .scle, and yet shows no other signs of 
illness than this strange impassiveness. He is 
fed with liquids poured down his throat; his 
limbs are moved with difficulty by the attend- 
ants, as though the muscles had become fixed, 
and he never speaks, although his eyes move, 
and at times he seems to be sensible. The 
physicians believe it to be a genuine case of 
catalepsy, or of hysteria and simulated cata 
lepsy. There have been instances of- cure 
of both these disorders by fright, and an ex- 
perimeut was made on Finnegan. The physi- 
cians talked in his presence of cutting his 
jugular vein, so as to kill him and end his Buf- 
fering, and after a great show of preparation 
scratched his neck with the point of a kniie, 
bat he'exhibited no fright. 



Ignorant Praotitioners. — It is said that 
Montreal, Canada, has in the last 11 months 
lost one and one-half per cent, more of its pop- 
ulation than the city of New York, by death, 
and of this rate upward of 12 per cent, has 
been from small-pox. Singular to say many of 
the doctors oppose vaccinaiion, which accounts 
for this mortality. The Montreal Star appeals 
to the clergy for aid against the doctors who 
are so far behind the age in their practice. 



UsEfUl. ![JpOE|f«^XIOM. 



Combustion of Coal. — Combustion is a 
chemical process, consisting usually in a com- 
bination of the elements of our atmosphere 
(the oxyeeu) with the fuel. The main bub- 
stauce of fuel, espicially when it is coal, is car- 
bun, and tho chemical equivalent of this, 12, 
combines with two chemical equivalents, 2x16, 
or 32 parts by weight of oxygen, which is equal 
to two and two-third parts of oxygen for every 
part of carbon. A pound of coal requires thus 
two aud two-third pounds of oxygen for its 
perfect combustion ; as now one pound of this 
gas under ordinary atmospheric pressure occu- 
pies a space of some 12 or 13 cubic feet, or two 
and two-lhird pounds of oxygen a space of 34 
cubic feet, which iu tho air is diluted with 
four times this amount of nitrogen, it requires 
five times this quantity, or not less than some 
17U cubic feet of fresh common air to furnish 
tho oxygen required; it is therefore necessary 
to pass 170 cubic feet of air through the fur- 
nace gates iu order to secure the perfect com- 
bustion of every pound of coal. If less air is 
passed, the combustion is retarded, while au 
excess of air cools the furnace. 



Spontaneous Fire in Hat.— A somewhat re- 
markable case of spontaneous combustion 
occurred laht fall at Azatlan, Wisconsin. 
Mr. Jumes Payne, a well known farmer 
of that town, some time since cut and 
put into his barn about ten tons of 
clover hay, which was quite in a green condi- 
tion. A few days afterward smoke was Been 
issuing from Mr. Payne's barn, and it was Boon 
discovered that the clover was on fire, and only 
by the most strenuous exertions of himself and 
neighbors were the flames finally extinguished. 
The fact of spontaneous combustion from tbe 
fermenlive heat of uncured clover, is admited 
by all as being the cause of the fire. 



DoptES-pc EcofJopy. 



Importance of the Inorganic Constituents 
of Food. 

The bodies of animals in a state of health, 
though chiefly composed of organic substances, 
contuiu, nevertheless, always certain inorganic 
salts, eiihor in combination or solution. The 
soft parts of the bodies are here intended, and 
not tbe bones, which are, of course, largely 
composed of inorganic matter. Mr. J. Forster 
has recently described some interesting experi- 
ments on the effect of gradually reducing the 
quantity of these salts in the system, by feed- 
ing nniraals with food of an entirely nutritious 
description, but completely deprived of such 
salts. The food employed consisted of albu- 
men, starch aud fat, with entirely pure water. 
Animals thus treated suffer gradual derange- 
ments of the functions of various important 
organs, which derangements go on until tbe 
power of assimilation of the food taken is so 
far reduced as to prevent the proper repair of 
the ordinary waste of the system. The natural 
consequence of this would be to produce decline 
or death. But death usually ensues before it 
could be brought about by a cause so slowly act- 
ing, since the deficiency of salts, by arresting 
some of the processes necessary to life, precip- 
itates the destruction of the organism before it 
could perish by exhaustion. Exhaustion is the 
effect produced upon the muscles by withhold- 
ing salts, but in the nerves there appear, first, 
increased excitability, and then paralysis of 
the nerve centers. The quantity of salts neo- 
essary in the food iB less than has heretofore 
been supposed, but further experiments are 
necessary to determine its exact amount. 



Mystery of the Lakes. — Lake Erie is only 
GO or 70 feet deep; but lake Ontario, which is 
592 feet deep, is 210 feet below the tide level of 
the ocean, or as low as most parts of the Gulf 
of St. Lawrence, and the bottoms of lake Hu- 
ron, Michigan and Superior, although the sur- 
face is not much higher, are all from their vast 
depths, on a level wiih the bottom of Ontario. 
Now, as the discharge through the river De- 
troit, after allowiug for the probable portion 
carried off by evaporation, does not appear by 
any means equal to the quantity of water 
which the three upper lakes receive, it has 
been conjectured that a subterranean river may 
run from lake Superior, by the Huron, to lake 
Ontario. This conjecture is not improbable, 
and accounts for the singular fact that salmon 
and herring are caught in all the lakes commu- 
nicating with the St. Lawrence, but no others. 
As the falls of Niagara must have always ex- 
isted, it would puzzle the naturalist to say how 
these fish got into the upper lakes without 
some subterranean river; moreover, any peri- 
odical obstruction of the river would furnish a 
not improbable solution of the mysterious flux 
and reflux of the lakes. 



Dkteotion of Adulterated Wine. — M. De 
Cherville gives the following useful hints for 
deciding whether red wines are artificially col- 
ored or not: "Pour into a glass a small quan- 
tity of tbe liquid yon wish to teBt, and dissolve 
a bit of potash iu it. If no sediment forms, 
and if the wiue assumes a greenish hue, it has 
not been artificially colored; if a violet sedi- 
ment forms the wine has been colored with 
elder or mulberries; if the sediment is red.it 
has been colored with beet root or Pernambuco 
wood; if violet red, with logwood; if yellow, 
with pbytolac berries; if violet blue, with pivet 
berries; and if pale violet, with sunflower." 



Cure for Corns. — The safest, the most ac- 
ce^ible", and the most efficient cure of a corn on 
the toe is to double a piece of thick, soft buck- 
skin, cut a hole in it large enough to receive the 
corn, and bind it around the toe. If in addi- 
tion to this the foot is soaked in warm water for 
five or more minutes every night and morning, 
and a few drops of sweet oil or other oily bud-. 
stance, are patiently rubbed in on the end after 
the soaking the corn will almost, infallibly be- 
come loose enough in a few days to be easily 
picked out with a fiugernail. This saves the 
necessity of paring the com which operation 
has sometimes been followed with painful and 
dangerous symptoms. If the corn becomes in- 
convenient again, repeat the process at once. — 
Hall's Journal of Health. 

Healthfulness of Apples. — The frequent 
use of apples, either before or after meals, has 
a most healthful effect upon digestion. Better 
eat less meat and more fruit. An eminent 
French physician thinks that the decrease of 
dyspepsia and bilious affections iu Paris is 
owing to the increased consumption of apples, 
which fruit he maintains is an admirable pro- 
phylactic and tonic, as well as a very nourish- 
ing and easily digesied article of food. The 
Parisians are said to devour one hundred mil- 
lions of apples every winter — that is. they did 
before the war. Whether this estimate i* true 
r not, the French are extravagantly fond of 
Apples and other fruit. 



Blasting Accidents — A Hint Worth Re- 
membering. — Most people are familiar with 
the fact that friction of the feet on a dry carpet 
or other non-conducting floor is capable of so 
charging the person with electricity that a 
spark may be drawn from almost any part of 
the body. Thus it is a common trick to light 
the gas with the finger after shuffling along the 
floor. An exchange calls attention to the cir- 
cumstance that the facts just stated may prove 
to be a frequent but little understood cause of 
accidents in blasting, and which applies to 
powder as well as nitro-glycerine. The blaster, 
not aware that he is often a walking charge of 
electricity, proceeds to his work, inserting car- 
tridge after cartridge of nitro-glycerine, until 
he comes to the last, which is armed with the 
electric fuse. The moment his hand touches 
one of the naked wires, a current of electricity 
may pass from his body through tbe priming, 
and produce an explosion. Hence, before the 
blaster handles the wires he should invariably 
grasp some metal in moist contact with the 
earth, or place tioth hands in contact with the 
moist walls of the tunnel or shaft in Vhich he 
is working. 

To Keep Ice from Windows. — This advice is 
hardly appropriate for our California climate 
under ordinary circumstances; but if the cold 
continues to increase as it has for the last two 
week's, it may be found useful even her: Take 
an ordinary paintbrush or sponge and rub over 
the glass once or twice a day, a little alcohol. 
This will keep the glass as free from ice as in 
middle of summer, and give as fine a polish as 
can be got iu any other way. 

A process of pulping leather in engines, sim- 
ilar to those used for beating rags in a paper 
mill, is now in use iu Massachusetts. By 
rolling into sheets under considerable pressure, 
a product of great tenacity, homogeuity, and 
closeness of texture is obtained which is, more- 
over, perfectly waterproof. 

SingulabFact. — When the beautiful feathers 
on the breast of a humming bird are examined 
under the microscope, no colors are to be seen. 
The brilliant tints come from the display of 
light upon the bird under different angles. 



Professional Statistics. — In England there 
is one lawyer for every 1,240 of the population* 
France, one for every 1,970; in Belgium, one 
for every 2, 700;. and in Prussia, one for every 
12,000 only. Another curious fact is 
that in England' the number of persons belong- 
ing to each of the different professions is nearly 
the same. Thus there are 34,970 lawyers, 35,- 
488 clergymen, and 45,955 physicians. In 
Prussia, on the other hand, there are 4,809 
physicians to only 1,362 lawyers. 

Chinese Fish-Hatching. — A curious mode 
of fish-hatching is said to be followed in China. 
Having collected the necessary spawn from the 
water's edge, the fishermen place a certain 
quantity in an empty heu'segg, which is sealed 
up with wax and put under the sitting hen. 
After some days they break the egg, and empty 
the fry into water well warmed by the sun, and 
here nurse them until they are sufficiently 
strong to be turned into a lake or river. 

A recent patent for a map consists in having 
those portions intended to represent the rivers, 
lakes and oceans filled with actual water. This 
is done by attaching the map to a back of vood 
of sufficient; thickness. The rivers, etc., are 
dug out, filled with water and glazed. Such 
maps may be hung upon the wall iu tho usual 
manner. 



First Use of Postal Cards.— Prof. Emanuel 
Herman, of Vienna, first introduced postal 
cards. They were used in England, Germany, 
and Switzerland in 1870, in Belgium and Den- 
mark in 1871, and in Norway, Russia and the 
United Stated in 1872-3. In some foreign 
countries a card is attached on which an an- 
swer may be returned. 



Cocks' Comb3 as Food. — The combs of Span- 
ish and Leghorn fowls are sold in some parts 
of Europe as choice delicacies for the palates 
of thoae who sigh for fresh appetizers. Under 
the name of "Cretes de Coq," a supply of 
these morsels has been recently imported from 
Paris. The combs are of large size, both single 
and rose, and are put up in white vinegar, in 
long tubular glass bottles, holding about a pint, 
sealed with black wax. When we say that 
these small bottles cost at wholesale in Paris 
more than a dollar in gold each, the reflection 
is forced that many a large combed rooster 
may in future be sacrificed to Mammon, as 
many were offertd up to Esculapius. There 
are enough large combs in the yards of some of 
our breeders to make a fortune if they could be 
utilized. We hope, however, the combs on the 
Mediterranean class will be reduced in size, 
as many large ones amount to positive deform- 
ity.— Poultry World. 



Miss Sedgwick has asserted that the more 
intelligent a woman becomes, other things 
being equal, the more judiciously she will 
manage her domestic concerns. And we add 
that the more knowledge a woman possesses 
of the great principles of morals, philosophy 
and human happiness, the more importan.ee 
she will attach to her station, aud to the name 
of a good housekeeper. It is only those who 
have been superficially educated, or instructed 
only in showy accomplishments, who despise 
the ordinary duties of life as beneath their 
notice. Such persons have not sufficient clear- 
ness of reason to see' that domestic economy 
includes everything which is calculated to make 
people love home and be happy there. — O&r- 
mantown Telegraph, 



Beef Tea. — Take one pound of juicy, lean 
beef — say a piece from the shoulder or the 
round — and mince it. Put it, with its juice, 
into an earthen vessel containing a pint of 
tepid -water, and let the whole stand for one 
hour. Then slowly heat it to the boiling point, 
and let it boil for three minutes. Strain the 
liquid through a colander, and stir in a little 
salt. If preferred, a little pepper or allspice 
may be added. 

Mutton tea may be prepared in the same 
way. It makes an agreeable change when the 
patient has become tired of beef tea. 



A chain of compressed cakes of gun cotton 
tied around the trunk of a large tree and ex- 
ploded will, it is stated, cut it down instantly 
by the violence of its action. The cut through 
tne trunk is as sharp as that made by the keen- 
est ax. 



The Brooklyn tower of the East river Brook- 
lyn bridge was completed on the 16th of 
"December. Its total hight is 268 feet— 48 feet 
higher than Bunker Hill monument. It pre- 
sents a very imposing appearance; we hope it 
will not prove a tower of folly. 

Use for Snakes. — A farmer in Washington 
county, Ky., has found a practical use for a 
snak6. For two years ho has had one shut up 
in his corn crib, and all that time not a single 
mouse has been seen there. 



European Languages. — A recent calculation, 
relative to the European languages shows that 
English is spoken by 99,000,000 of persons, 
German by 45,000,000, Spanish 55,000,000 and 
French by 45,000,000. ______ 

Eelskins dried and cut in slips make very 
strong belt lacings, 



Beef Clubs. — Beef clubs are in order in 
some parts of the west. A dozen or 20farmers 
combine and each one agrees to furnish a fat 
steer at a time allotted him. This is divided 
among the members of the club. Accurate ac- 
counts are kept, and at the end of the year a 
settlement made. The quality of the beef is 
regulated by the proportion of tallow to the 
meat, a fine being levied if it falls below a cer- 
tain per cent. 



Sponge Gingerbread. — One cup of sour 
milk, one cup of molasses, one half cup of 
butter, two eggs, one and one-half teaspoonfnls 
of salaratus, oue tablespoonful of ginger, flour 
to make it thick as pound cake. Put the but- 
ter, molasses and ginger together and make 
them quite warm, then add the milk, flour 
and salaratus and bake as soon as possible. 



Dripping Cake. — Mix well together two 
pounds of flour, a pint of warm milk, and a 
tablespoonful of yeast; let it rise about half an 
hour; then add half a pound of broken sugar, 
a quarter of a pound of currants, and a pound 
of good fresh beef dripping; boil the whole 
well for nearly a qurater of an hour, and bake 
in a moderately hot oven. 



24 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



[January 9, 1875. 




W. B. EWER Sbhioe Editob. 

OEWEY «fc CO., I»ix"blisliers. 

i T. DEWEY, GEO. H. STB0NG 
W. B. EWER, JKO. L. BOONE 

Office, No. 224 Sansome St., S. E. Corner 
of California St., San Francisco. 

Subscription and Advertising- Bates. 

SUBBOBrFXlONS payable in advance — For one year $4; 

glx months, $2.25; three months, $1.25. Remittances 

by reefntfirftd tettmrB or P. f>. orders at our rink 

Advebtibino Bates. — 1 week. 1 month. 3 months. 1 year. 

Per line 25 .80 $i.i>0 $3.00 

One-half inch $1.00 3.00 7.50 24.00 

One inch 1.50 4 00 12.00 40.00 

San Francisco: 

Saturday Morning. Jan. 9, 1875. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS- 
editobials AND GENERAL NEWS.— 

Eastern Investors in MineB; Hydraulic Mining in 
California: Academy of Sciences. 17- Brooks' Im- 
proved Process of Distillation; The Bullion Product; 
The Mining Laws; The Centennial Exhibition Huild- 
fug, Philadelphia, 1876, 24-25. The United States 
of Colombia; Patents and Inventions; Congress; The 
SpaniBh Revolution; Terrible Explosion, and other 
Items of News, 28- 

ILLUSTRATIONS.— Hydraulic Mining in Califor- 
nia, 17. International Exhibition; The Centennial 
Art Gallery, 25. 

CORRES -ONDEMCE.- Arizona— The Dreary De- 
sert Trip— The Quaha^e Mines, 18. 

MECHANICAL PROGRESS. — Economic Use 
of Fuel; Glass for Veneering, Paneling, Etc.; New 
Engraving Process; Imitation Patents; Improving 
Kiver Navigation; Cutting Steel KailB Cold; Bronzes 
Inorustes; A New Shell; Improvement in Map Mak- 
ing, 19- 

SCIENTIFIC PROGRESS.— The Vacuum an Ab- 
solute Non-Conductor of iilectricitv; Singular Cause 
of Boiler Explosion; The Magic Lantern in Disease; 
The Mysteries of the Human Throat; Metallic Sul- 
phides; Action of MagDetB on Spectra; An Experi- 
ment with Silver; Fatty Matters in Cast Iron, 19. 

JOINING STOCK MARKJET.— Thursday's Sales 
at the San Francisco Stuck Board; Notices of Assess- 
ments; Meetings and Dividends; Review of Stock 
Market for the Week. 20. 

MINING SUMMARY.— From various counties in 
California and Nevada, 20-21. 

GOOD HEALTH. Wet and Dry Bathing; Poisoned 
Confectionery; A Singular Case; Cure for Corns: 
Healtntulness of Apples; Care of the Ear; Effect of 
Imagination; Ignorant Practitioners, 23. 

USEFUL INFORMATION. — Mystery of the 
Lakes; Blasting Accidents— A Hiot Worth Remem- 
bering; To Keep Ice from Windows; Singular Fact; 
Combustion of Coal; Spontaneous Fire in Hay; De- 
tection of Adulterated Wine; Professional Statistics; 
Chinese Fish Hatching; First Use of Postal Cards; 
Use for Snakes; European Languages, 23. 

DOMESTIC ECONOMY. — Importance of the 
Inorganic Constituents ot Food; Cocks' Combs as 
Food; Beef Tea; Beef Clubs; Sponge Gingerbread; 
Dripping Cake. 23. 

MISCELLANEOUS.— The Empire Mine; Placers 
in Nevada; I'he New "C and C. Shaft;" Covered up 
the Nugget; Beaver District; Village Belle, 18. Jute; 
TheO"iuha Mine; Panamint District; The Eureka 
Mine; Lively Times on the Comstock; Paper Barrels, 
22. South Mountain; New York Hill Mine; Gold in 
Sonora; Geological Puzzle; Opening Outside Mines; 
Coal Borer; Hew Shaft; From Alturas, 26. 



The Mining Laws. 

Within the past week no doubt many thou- 
sand mining claims have been re-located, by 
reasm of forfeiture of claims by the owners not 
complying with the provisions of the mining 
laws of the United States. The fact that claims 
have been located by parties not original own. 
ers, has no doubt created considerable dis- 
satisfaction in many places. There seems to 
be, moreover,a difficulty among the miners con- 
cerning the correct interpretation of tne law, 
and it is to be expected that considerable liti- 
gation will arise from disputes as to ownership 
of mines. A correspondent, one of many, 
writes to us from Mon tor, Alpine county, and 
says: "On Jan. 2d, 1875, the writer re-located 
a claim in this to *d. which claim at the time 
had not received the amount of work upon it 
required by the law which took effect upon the 
advent of the new year. Does the re-location 
hold good? 

It is to be supposed that by this time the 
miners know the amount o"f expenditure re- 
quired on their claims annually. On claims 
located after May 10. 1872, $100 of work must 
be done or improvements made each year; and 
on claims located prior to May 10, 1872, $10 
worth of work for eaoh 100 feet on the vein, 
until a patent is issued. The time required for 
fir* 6 anuuai expenditure on claims located prior 
to the pis-age of the Act, was extended twice, 
the Ia*L time to January 1, 1875. Those claims 
nut patented were subject to the provisions of 
the law requiring expenditure and if the work 
was not done is most decidedly open to reloca- 
tion. If the claim referred to by our corres- 
pondent had not had the work done upon it, 
or the improvements made which were required, 
his re-location most certainty holds good. 

However, even if located after the passage 
of thf Act of May 10th, 1872, and the annual 
expenditure had not been made within the year, 
it was open to re-location in both cases; pro- 
vided, however, that the original locators had 
not commenced work upon it on the 1st of Jan- 
nary. If they only did five minutes work on it 
on that day, however, their chances are good 
for holding, as the law says the claims can be 
held provided the original locators, their heirs 
or assig b have resumed work on the date above 
ment.oned. It d es nut say that they must do 
ali the work continuously from that day, but 



simply that they must have "resumed work." 
Sticking to the letter of the law they may do 
$50 worth of work on the first day of the year, 
and $50 on the last and still hold their ground. 
This view is maintained to be right by many 
competent judges. 

Our correspondent also says that another 
claim was jumped in which is a large quantity 
of valuable machinery, hoisting works, e etc. 
He wants to know if the location holds whether 
the machinery becomes forfeit also. To this 
we may answer assuredly not. The Govern- 
ment owned the land and gave it to be worked 
on certain conditions; when the conditions are 
not fulfilled, the Government simply reserved 
the right to take it back and give it to some one 
else who will fulfill the conditions. It never 
owned the machinery and has nothing to do 
with it, that being property entirely out of the 
Government reach. There is no mention in 
the law of forfeiture of machinery. If the 
claim is not worked it may be re-located; but 
you can't originally locate machinery, so you 
can't re-locate it. 

A decision made last month by the Depart- 
ment in a hypotbttu al ca>e may be of interest, 
or decide some important question among the 
miners. It is as follows: 

"A claim located prior to March 10, 1872, 
upon whii'h the amount required by the Act of 
that date shall since have been expended will 
not be subject to re-location January 1, 1875, 
provided that the claimants have complied, in 
all respects, with the local laws." 

That is as much as to say that provided the 
first annual expenditure has been made at any 
time since May 10th, 1872, the claim could not 
be relocated on the 1st of January even though 
the work was not done in 1874. Such claims 
are safe until January 1876. 

Another correspondent says he has located 
1500 feet on a ledge, then moved 10 feet away 
from the end of his claim, -sunk ji shaft and 
claimed 1500 feet more. He wants to know 
whether he can hold both. He cannot hold 
both claims in any such way, as the law ex- 
pressly states that a miner can only locate 1500 
feet on one veto. But he can get some one else 
to locate the other olaim in the usual way, and 
then buy him out and so get possession legally 
of the whole 3,000 feet. But what a man wants 
wit a 3000 feet of a ledge is a puzzle. Il is hard 
work enough generally to take care of 1,000 
feet. 

The Bullion Product. 

The total bullion product of the Pacific 
States and Territoiies for the year 1873 was 
$72,258,693. This year it was $74,401 055 
showing an increase of $2 142,362 over 1873. 
Jno. J. Valentine, General Superintendent of 
Wells, Fargo & Co.'s Express, who computes 
the most reliable statistics on this point writes 
a6 follows: 

We hand you herewith a copy of our annual 
statement of precious metals produced in the 
States and Territories west of the Missouri 
river, including British Colombia, during 1874, 
which shows an aggregate yield of $74,401,055, 
being an excess of $2,142,3*62 over 1873. Cali- 
fornia, Nevada, Ut.ih, Colorado and British 
Columbia increased; Oregon, Washington, 
Idaho, Montana, Arizona and Mexico (west 
coast) decreased. The increase in Nevada and 
Colorado is merely nominal, but in California 
and Utah it is $3,100,000, three-fourths of 
which is to the credit of California. 



lllt&llllll 



co oo o to as oo 



CO oi O co — >■ en — 



Or wo 



Gold Dust and Bullion 
by Express. 



mm »a <*» en *. »-» 
co "ca "i-> '-a « co "oi oi 

co -j co c. co ZTi co or 



-JO* 

wo; 
o o * 






- r: '"*- "— 



Gold Dust and Bullion 

by 

other Conveyances. 



Silver Bullion by 
Express. 



Ores and Base Bullion 
by Freight. 



In our statement for 1873 we referred to the 
yield— $72, 258,693 -as "undoubtedly the lar- 
gest, for one year, in the history of the coast." 
The accuracy of the statement has been ques- 
tioned, and the yield of 1853 referred to as 
b-ing greater. Dr. L'nd^rman, Director of the 
U. S. Mint, whose information is probably as 
leliable as may be had, names $65,000,000 as 
the amount produc d in 1853, and that amount 
was not exceeded until 1873, which is now ex- 
ceeded by 1874, and the recent developments 
on the Comstuc'; lode justify the belief that the 
total product for 1875 will approximate $80,- 
000,000, Yours truly, Jno. J. Valentine, 
General Superintendent. 



Brooks 7 Improved Process of Distillation. 

We take pleasure in laying be/ore onr read- 
ers an improvement in distillation, which.the 
inventor, Mr. Bobert C. Brooks, of this city, 
has just patented through the Mining and 
Scientific Press Patent Agency. Before de- 
scribing the process we will state that Mr. 
Brooks is a practical distiller, of about thirty 
years' experience, the last ten years of that 
time having been expended in completing the 
improvements which he has just secured by 
patent. By the new process and improved ap- 
paratus the inventor claims to produce alcoholic 
spirits directly from the still, and by a single 
distillation, which are absolutely free from fusi 
oil. We have seen the reports of several of 
our best chemists, who have analyzed the pro- 
ducts of Mr. Brooks' process and which verified 
his claims to purity and the absence of fusil 
oil. It is held by many persons that whiskey 
without fusil oil would be of no value, in fact 
that it would not be whiskey, but alcohol. 
This error of opinion arises from the fact that 
fusil oil, or amylic acid, as it is chemically 
known, is erroneously supposed by many per- 
sons, and even in some of our standard books, 
is defined as the oil of grain, oil of potato, etc. 
Mr. Brooks has discovert- d, and his experiments 
have proven, that the essential oil of grain is an 
entirely separate product, which vaporizes 
below, or at about the boiling point of water, 
212° Fahr., while fusil oil requires a tempera- 
ture of 280° to be converted into a vapor. This 
would therefore spoil such an argument. All 
the volatile products which are obtained from 
wort, volatilize below the boiling point of 
wa^er, except fusil oil, and between the boiling 
point of the^e two products there is a diflVrenoe 
or space of temperature of about 70 degrees. 
Mr. Brooks takes advantage of this difference 
or space of temperature to prevent the volatil- 
ization of the fusil oil and leave it in the spent 
wort, and to do this he has invented an im- 
proved distilling apparatus which he has also 
secured by letters patent. This apparatus is 
so constructed that it is impossible to obtain a 
temperature in the upper chamber of the still 
exceeding- the boiling point of water or 212° 
Fahr. Consequently we can only convert to 
vapor those pioducts of the wort which volatil- 
ize at a point below that temperature, thus 
leaving the fusil oil and a large portion of the 
water in the wort. The ether which is first 
volatilized, is condensed and withdrawn entirely 
from the siill before the alcoholic product 
begins to vaporize so that the subsequent op- 
eration proceeds without hiudmnce. 

Mr. Brooks calls his still an automatic pul- 
sating still, because when it is at work its 
operation is automatically intermittent, thus 
producing a pulsation as the products of differ 
ent specific gravities pass up into the conden- 
ser. 

We cannot spare the space in which to de- 
scribe the complete construction and operation 
of this improved apparatus, and to attempt to 
give the reader a full understanding of the 
claims of the inventor, without such descrip- 
tion would be folly. We will, however, at- 
tempt to show the importance of the invention 
and explain the theory upon which it is based. 

Wort, which is the fermented solution from 
which spirits are obtai ed contains four volatil- 
izable products which vaporize as follows, 
(Fan) : ether, 173°; alcohol, 188°; water, 212° 
and fusil oil. 269°. It will be Been that the 
water product stands between the alcohol aDd 
fut.il oil, giving a clear space of 81° Fah. of 
temperature bttween the desirable and unde- 
siiable products. 

In Mr. Brooks' apparatus he employs a con- 
densing and sep irating vessel between the 
upper chamber of the still and the main con- 
denser through wbich a constant stream of 
cold water is made to pass, and this vessel re- 
ceiving the vapors of ether which first pass 
from the still condenses them without allowing 
them to pass into the worm of the still. The 
condensed ether is then withdrawn entirely 
from the still before the next product (alcohol) 
enters the vessel. The condensation of the 
ether raises the temperature of the vessel so 
that the alcoholic vapors will pass oyer into the 
worm and to the main condenser before it is 
oondensed. 

Messrs. Van Winkle & Brooks the proprie- 
tors of this patent have a large still in practical 
operation at School House station, near this 
city, with which they have proven beyond a 
doubt that the result of their process is all that 
is claimed for it. 

As is usually remarked in such cases "the 
greatest wonder is that distillers "have been so 
1 ng seeking for some method or process for 
frteing spirits from fusil oil without discover- 
ing this simple common-sense plan. Fre- 
quently the very thing we seek for lies just at 
our doors while we explore the country in a 
vain search for it. The rationale of the process 
comprises nothing that is not familiar to the 
chemist. It only required that this and that be 
put together and a practical means of carrying 
out the plan devised to produce the long 
looked for result. We shall speak again of this 
invention as it is developed. 

The Jersey mines are attracting a good share 
of attention. The mines are situated 50 miles 
in a direction weBt of north from Battle Moun- 
tain, Nev. But little work has been done, ex- 
\ cept on the Trimble mine. 



The Centennial Exhibition Building, 
Philadelphia, 1876. 

We will suppose that all the readers of the 
Rural Press have already heard of the manner 
in which it is proposed to celebrate the hundredth 
anniversary of the existence of the United States 
as an independent nation, and of the magnificent 
building in which all the nations of the earth are 
invited to exhibit their products. Of this build- 
ing we give a splendid illustration, as also of the 
Art Gallery, which it is expected will contain 
some of the most distinguished works of painting 
and sculpture to be found in Europe or America. 
The whole structure will be supported on piers 
of massive masonry, while the superstructure 
will consist of wrought iron columns with roof 
triasses of the same material. The columns will 
be of rolled channel bars with plates riveted to 
the flanges, while the roof trusses are straight 
rafters with struts and tie bars. The building 
in shape, a parallelogram, extends east and west 
1,688 feet, and north and south 464 feet. 
Should necessity arise, these dimensions will be 
increased. 

The Principal Buildings 
Are the Main Building, the Art Gallery, the Ma- 
chinery Hall, the Agricultural and the Horticul- 
tural Halls. In the aggregate they cover a floor 
space of about 46 acres. 

The larger portion of the structure is one story 
in highth, and shows the main cornice upon the 
outside at 45 feet above the ground, the interior 
hight being 70 feet. At the centre of the longer 
sides are projections 416 feet in length, and in the 
centre of the shorter sides or ends of the building 
are projection's 216 feet in length. In these pro- 
jections, in the centre of the four sides, are locat- 
ed the main entrances, which are provided with 
arcades upon the ground floor, and central facades 
extending to the highth of 90 feet. 

Upon the corners of the building there are lour 
towers 75 feet in highth, and between the towers 
and the central projections or entrances, there is 
a lower roof introduced showing a cornice 24 feet 
above the ground. 

In order to obtain a central feature for the 
building as a whole, the roof over the central 
part, for 184 feet square, has been raised above 
the surrounding portion, and four towers, 48 feet 
square, rising to 120 feet in highth, have been in- 
troduced at the corners of the elevated roof. 

The areas covered are as follows: 

Ground Floor 872,320 sq.feet 20 02 acres. 

UpperFloors in projections. 37,344 " " .85 " 

" " in to were .... 26,344 " " .60 " 

Total 936,008 " " 21.47 " 

Ground Plan. 

The general arrangement of the ground plan 
shows a central avenue or nave 120 feet in width, 
and extending 1,832 feet in length. This is the 
longest avenue of that width ever introduced into 
an Exhibition Building. On eilher side of this 
nave there is an avenue 100 feet by 1,832 feet in 
length. Between the nave and side avenues are 
aisles 48 feet wide, and on the outer sides of the 
building smaller aisles 24 feet in width. 

In order to 'break the great length of the roof 
lines, three cro.^s avenues or transepts have been 
introduced of the same widths and in the same 
relative positions to each other as the nave and 
avenues running lengthwise, viz: a central tran- 
sept 120 feet in width by 416 feet in length, with 
one on either side of 100 feet by 416 feet, and 
aisles between of 48 feet. 

The intersections of these avenues and transepts 
in the central portion of the building result in di- 
viding the ground floor into nine open spaces free 
from snpporting columns, and covering in the 
aggregate an area of 416 feet square. Four of 
these spaces are 100 feet square, four 100 feet by 
120 feet, and the central space or pavilion 120 
feet square. The intersections of the 48 foot 
aisles produce four interior courts 48 feet square, 
one at each corner of the central space. 

The main promenades through the nave and 
central transept are each 30 feet in width, and 
those through the center of the side avenues and 
transepts 15 feet each. All other walks are 10 
feet wide, and lead at either end to exit doors. 

The Art Gallery. 

Is located on a line parallel with and northward 
of the Main Exhibition Building. 

It is on the most commanding portion of great 
Lansdowne Plateau and looks southward over the 
city. 

It is elevated on a terrace six feet above the gen- 
eral level of the plateau — the plateau itself being 
an eminence 116 feet above the surface of the 
Schuylkill River. 

The entire structure is in the modern renais- 
sance. The materials are Granite, Glass and 
Iron. No, Wood is used in*the construction, and 
the building is thoroughly fireprcfof. The struc- 
ture is 365 feet in length, 210 feet in width, and 
59 feet in highth over a spacious basement 12 feet 
in highth, surrounded by a dome. 

The dome rises from the center of the structure 
to the highth of 150 feet from the ground. It is of 
Glass and Iron and of a unique design; it termi- 
nates in a colossal bell— from which the figure of 
Columbia rises with protecting hands. 

A figure of colossal size stands at each comer 






January g, 1875.] 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



25 



of the base of the dome. These figures typify 
the four quarters of the globe. 

The main entrance opens on a hall 82 feet 
long, 60 leet wide, and 53 feet high, decorated 
in the modern renaissance style; on the farther 
side of this hall, three doorways, each 16 feet 
wide and 25 feet high, open into the center 
hall; this hall is 83 feet square, the ceiling 



14 feet wide, which opens on its north line into a 
series of private rooms, thirteen in number, de- 
signed for studios and smaller exhibition rooms. 
All the galleries and central hall are lighted 
from above; the pavilions and studios are lighted 
from the sides. The pavilions and central hall 
are designed especially for exhibitions of sculp- 
ture. There will be 



Dept. VII. Apparatus and methods for the in- 
crease and diffusion of knowledge. 

Dept. VIII. Engineering, public works, arch- 
itecture, 

Dept. IX. Plastic and graphic arts. 

Dept. X. Objects illustrating efforts for the 
improvement of the physical, intellectual and 
moral condition of man. 



In this connection we may mention that the 
San Francisco Journal of Commerce has ap- 
plied for a space 50x50, wherein to represent raw 
materials and staples produced on the Pacific 
Coast. 

How the Work Progresses. 

Philadelphia papers represent the work as pro- 
gressing favorably. The contractor is trying to 



wm*mmmw 




Nei<i§>^- 



the dome rising over it So feet in highth. 

From its east and west sides extend the galler- 

es, each 9S feet long, 48 leet wide, and 35 feet 

n highth. These galleries admit of;temporary di- 

isions lor the more advantageous display of paint- 



Ten Departments 

Of classification, divided into one hundred and 
nine groups, subdivided into one thousand and 
ninety-nine classes. The departments of classifi- 
catfon will be as follows: 



The Pacific Coast Commissioners 

With their alternates are as follows: 

California — j Dunbar Creigh, San Francisco; al- 
ternate, Benj. P Kooser, Santa Cruz. Oregon — J 
W Virtue, Baker City; alternate, A J Ditfur, 



place the Memorial Hall under temporary cover* 
to allow work inside during the winter. The 
interior walls have reached a highth of about fifty 
feet, or above the span of the arches which form 
the entrance to the magmficient vestibule. On 




lgs. The center hall and galleries form "one 
rand hall 2S7 feet long and 85 feet wide, capa- 
le of holding eight thousand persons, nearly 
vice the dimensions of the largest hall in the 
)untry. From the two galleries, doorways open 
ito two smaller galleries, 28 feet wide and S9 
:et long. These open north and south into pri- 
He apartments which connect with the pavilion 
)oms, forming two side galleries 210 feet long, 
.long the whole length of the north side of the 
tain galleries and central hall extends a corridor 



THEUCENTENNIAL ART GALLERY. 



Dept. I. Materials in their unwrought condi- 
tion — mineral, vegetable and animal. 

Dept. II. Materials and manufactures the re- 
sult of extractive or combining processes. 

Dept. III. Textile and felted fabrics — apparel, 
costumes and ornaments for the person. 

Dept. IV. Furniture and manufactures of gen- 
eral use in construction and in dwellings. 

Dept. V. Tools, implements, machines and 
processes. 
^Dept. VI. Motors and transportation."^ 



Portland. "^Nevada— W W McCoy, Eureka; al- 
ternate, Jas W Haines. Genoa. Utah— John H 
Wickiyer, Salt Lake City; alternate, Oscar G 
Sawyer, Salt Lake City. Idaho— Thos Donald-- 
son, Boise City; alternate, Christopher W Moote, 
Boise City. Montana — W H Claggett, Deer 
Lodge City; alternate, Patrick A Largey, Vir- 
ginia City. Washington Territory — Elwood Ev- 
ans, Olympia; alternate, Alexander S Abernelhy, 
Cowlitz county. Arizona — Hon. Richard C Mc- 
Cormick, D. C.; alternate, John Walson, Tucson. 



the|exterior walls all the rough granite up to the 
warer-table" is in place, and on the southwest 
corner the masons have laid a considerable quan- 
tity of the fine Richmond granite which is to 
form the superstructure. Enough is now laid at 
the Memorial Hall to indicate its beauty and dem- 
onstate the imposing character of the edifice. The 
granite at the southwest corner is about six feet 
above the water-table. It is backed with brick, 
laid in cement, the entire wall being five feet thick 
and is to be continued to the full highth. 



26 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS 



[January 9, 1875. 



South Mountain. 

This camp which, until recently, has been 
wholly unknown to everybody with the excep- 
tion of a few, is now commencing to attract the 
attention of capit lists, both in Idaho and 
Nevada, and is destined to become a large 
and prosperous mining camp at no far distant 
day. 

The South Mountain 
Consolidated Mining company-, an organization 
which numbers among its members several 
wealthy and influential citizens, not only of 
Owyhee, hut also of San Francisco, has em- 
ployed a large number of men all the fall in 
the work of extracting the precious metal from 
the bowels of mother earth, and consequently 
has a large amount of ore on hand which will 
yield $300 to $500 per ton. They have recently 
constructed a large furnace for the purpose of 
smelting the ores of that camp, and have ap- 
pointed Sam "Weasels, a skillful metallurgist, 
and one of the original looators of the camp, to 
superintend the works. 

The Furnace is now Working to a Charm, 
And surpasses the most sanguine expectations 
of those who always had the utmost confidence 
in its ultimate success. "We understand that it 
is the intention of the company to erect 
another furnace next spriug. We, in common 
with hundreds of others who take an interest in 
the future welfare of Owyhee county, sincerely 
hope that suocess will crown their efforts, and 
that they will succeed in every enterprise which 
they may undertake; for it depends on the suc- 
cess of the persons who have money invested 
in South Mountain for the success of every 
person in Owyhee county. Comparatively 
speaking, the people of South Mountain have, 
until quite recently, been isolated, they being 
almost entirely cut off from any connection 
with the outside world ; but now that Platte 
Burr, the energetic superintendent of the 
Atlantic Pacific, Nevada and Northern Tele- 
graph Line, has extended his line of telegraph 
from 

Silver City to South Mountain, 
The people of that isolated burg 'can no longer 
be wholly ignorant of what is transpiring 
around them. Next spring, when the company 
commences mining operations in good earnest 
and the permanency and value of the mines 
become established, good wagon-roads will un- 
doubtedly be constructed from various points, 
or no doubt some enterprising man will run a 
regular line of stages from Silver City to South 
Mountain. South Mountain City, formerly 
Bullion City, is located in close proximity to 
to Silver City, both camps not being over 30 
miles distant from each other. This circum- 
stance cannot fail to be of great benefit, finan- 
cially, to the people of both camps, inasmuch 
as they can go from one camp to another in a 
day's ride. , When we take all our natural ad- 
vantages into consideration we are led to the 
conclusion that there is, as we have already 
stated, a bright future in store for the people 
of Owyhee county. We think' that when the 
sun of another summer shall make its appear- 
ance that Silver City and South Mountain com- 
bined will 

Employ at Least 2,000 Men, 
And we furthermore think that the day is not 
far distant when Owyhee county will prove it- 
self to be one of the richest and most extensive 
gold and silver prodncing districts on the 
Pacific Coast. — Cor. Bedrock Democrat. 

New York Hill Mine. 

This mine is owned by an incorporated com- 
pany, whose principal place of business is at 
San Franaisco. The most of the stock of the 
company is owned by the estate of the late A. 
Delano. The miue is situated about two miles 
and a half south of Grass Yulley, It employs 
45 miners, and is paying, at the present time, 
$2.50 per day to each aimer. It is said that at 
an early day, and as soon as the mine has 
something better of surroundings, full wiges 
will be paid. The cost of drifting is $15 prr 
foot, and stoping costs $15 per ton, making the 
extraction of ore cost $15 pel: ton. Milling the 
ore costs §4.50 per ton, and the work has been 
so far done at the Larrimer mill. The number 
of tons worked during the year has been about 
500, and the average yield has ber-n not less 
than §50 per ton, making a total bullion yield 
of $25,000. The location is about 3.000 feet in 
length, and the ledge runs northeast and south- 
west, dipping to the northeast. The length of 
pay zme, so far as explored is 1,400 feet, with 
an average thickness of 2% feot. The country 
rock, as far as explored, consists of greenstone 
and slate. The ledge is worked through a tun- 
nel which has now a total length of 750 feet 
Th re are two drifts opened from the tunnel. 
There are 40O feet of backs above .the tunnel 
wordings. On the ledge there is a shaft, not 
used at present, but which is available at any 
time for working, of the depth of 700 feet. The 
total length of drifts in the mine is 500 feet. 
Mr. Joseph Snyder is the Superintendent of 
the mine. — Grass Valley Union. 

Gold in Sonoka.. — There is a report in 
Tucson, Arizona, regarding a rich gold mine 
in Sonora, on the San Miguel river, near Urea. 
Some lumps, worth $60, which were obtained 
by washing with a wooden bowl, have been ex- 
hibited here. The claims cover a mountain 
two mileB square, more or less, and gold is 
found on the entire surface. High up on the 
mountain a great deal of mining was done a 
century ago and continued down to the point 
where the vein turned to sulphurats of silver, 
which they could not work. 



Geological Puzzle. 

Prof. E. Weiser, of Georgetown, Colorado, 
contributes the following to the Journal of 
Science and Arts: Geologists have been not a 
little perplexed with the frozen rocks found in 
some of our silver mines in Clear Creek county, 
Colorado. I will first give a statement of the 
facts in the case, and then a theory for their 
explanation. There is a silver mine high up 
on McCiellau mountain called the Stevens 
mine. The altitude of this mine is 12,500 
feet. At the depth of from 60 to 200 feet, the 
crevice matter, eoDsisting of silica, calcite and 
ore, together with the surrounding wall-rocks, 
is found to be in a solid, frozen mass. Mc- 
Clellan mountain is one of the highest eastern 
spurs of the Snowy range; it has the form of a 
horseshoe, with a bold escarpment of felds- 
pathic rock, near 2,000 feet high, which in 
some places is nearly perpendicular. The Ste- 
vens mine is situated in the southwestern bed 
of the great horseshoe; it opens from the north- 
western. A tunnel is driven into the mountain 
on the lode, where the rock is almost perpen- 
dicular. Nothing unusual occurred until a 
distance of some 80 or 90 feet was made; and 
then the frozen territory was reached, and it 
has continued for over 200 feet. There are. no 
indications of a thaw, summer or winter; the 
whole frozen territory is surrounded by hard, 
massive rock, and the lode itself is as hard 
and solid as the rock. The miners being 
unable to excavate the- frozen material by pick 
or drill, to get out th*e ore, (for it is a rich lode, 
running argentiferous galena from 5 to 1,200 
ounces to the ton), found the only way was to 
kindle a large wood fire at night against the 
back end of the tunnel, and thus thaw the fro- 
zen material, and in the morning take out the 
disintegrated ore. This has been the mode of 
mining for more than two years. The tunnel 
is over 200 feet deep, and there is no diminu- 
tion of the frost; it seems to be rather increas- 
ing. There is, so far as we can see, no open- 
ing or channel through which the frost could 
possibly have Reached such a depth from the 
surface. There are other mines in the same 
vicinity in a like frozen state. 

From what we know of the depth to which 
frost usually penetrates into the earth, it does 
not appear probable that it could have reached 
the depth of 200 feet through the solid rock in 
the Stevens mine, nor even through the crevice 
matter of the lode, which as we have stated, is 
as hard as the rock itself. The idea, then, of 
the frost reaching such a depth from the out- 
side, being utterly untenable, 1 can do no othor 
way than to fall back upon the Glacial era of 
the Quaternary. Evidences of the Glacial 
period are found all over the Rocky mountains. 
Just above the Stevens mine there are the 
remains of a moraine nearly a mile long, and 
half a mile wide. The debris of this moraine 
consists of small square and angular stones, 
clearly showing that they have not come from 
any great distance-. And just over the range, 
on the Pacific slope, there are the remains of 
the largest moraine I have ever seen, consist- 
ing of fieldspathic boulders of immense size. 
I conclude, therefore, that it was during that 
period of intense cold that the frost penetrated 
so far down into these rocks, and that it has 
been there ever since, and bids fair to remain 
for a long time to come. 

Opening Outside Mines. 

Oar brother editors here in Virginia are 
spliitiug hairs about something which we sus- 
pect they would not disagree about for a mo- 
ment if they would sit down and exchange 
ideas instead of firing at long range at each 
other, as they are now doing. One wants meu 
of small means to explore Eastern Nevada 
and open up new enterprises. The other re- 
torts "Oh, yes, give up four dollars a day and 
go to Eastern Nevada and starve." Now both 
are right and both are wrong. It would be 
foolish to leave a means of making a comfort- 
able livelihood to go on auy uncertainty. But 
if several men, each with a surplus of several 
thousand dollars, choose to make up a purse 
with a part of their hoarded means to open 
some as yet unexplored field, there can be no 
objection; on the other hand, there is every 
reason to encourage such a course, for it is 
by such means that new mines are developed 
and new districts opened. There are two 
reasons why so mauy mining enterprises are 
failures. They are generally, first, lack of 
judgment, aud secondly, lack of means. One- 
half the woik done on mines in this State is 
dead work, because men followed their hopes 
after their leads were lost. In this we are 
not talking of the chronic prospector, whose 
feet have climbed every hill in the State, and 
who, were he to come upon a Potosi today, 
would trade it to-morrow for a mustang and 
a sack of flour to follow again his dream. 
Such mortals need a book of their own to 
describe them as they are. But, with careful 
business men, the easiest thing in the world 
is to be mistaken about a mine or the best way 
to explore it. Hence, this work should be ap- 
proached with the greatest care, and never 
started uutil capital sufficient to a little more 
than do the expected work is secured. For 
meu of small capital there is no way to go to 
work except by means of joint-stock companies 
or incorporations. The proof of this is, that 
notwithstanding thousands have tried, the 
really successful mining enterprises in the State 
outside of Storey county can be counted on 
one's fingers, and that after 12 years of toil. 
But if a company of men will each put in his 
quota, then secure a property which a man of 
experience is sure will justify the work, and go 



to work praotically and honestly, the proba- 
bility is that they will more certainly secure a 
fortune than by wandering about'these streets 
and betting on a guess. — Virginia Enterprise. 

Coal Boeer. — The Nanaimo Free Press says: 
The Vancouver Coal company are importiug 
from England a Diamond Rock Boring ma- 
chine which is calculated to work 'wonders in 
piercing the hard rock of the country hereabout. 
A machine similar to the one the company have 
obtained has been in operation at Middleboro'- 
on-Tees, and it bored a hole 690 feet in sand- 
stone in the short space of three months, in- 
cluding the time occupied in fixing the engine 
aud apparatus. By the Diamond Drill samples of 
the strata passed through are brought up in the 
form of cylindrical cores. Such a method mustbe 
invaluable, -securing, as it does, solid specimens 
of the rocks and minerals, which cannot only 
be judged by appearance in their natural con- 
dition, but may be analyzed without risk of 
error by mixture with contiguous rocks, as in 
the old system of boring. The speed of bor- 
ing with the new patent drill is considered to 
be from six to twelve times quicker than by 
the ordinary way. 

New Shaft. — A new shaft thro*ugh which 
to work that portion of the great bonanza lying 
in the Consolidated Virginia and California 
mines was started a few days since. The shaft 
will be of the largest size, and will be pushed 
downward as rapidly as possible. Its location 
is 1,040 feet northward from the main shaft of 
the Consolidated Virginia mine, aud it will be 
known as "C and C" shaft. As soon as it shall 
have been completed, hoisting apparatus of the 
most improved pattern will be pliced upon the 
surface and everything prepared to bring the 
great ore body below to daylight. And what 
with this and other improvements both in con- 
templation and in actual progress at our mines 
and the building of business and dwelling 
houses on every hand about us, a most pros- 
perous season for builders and mechanics gen- 
erally seems about dawning, or, rather, to have 
already dawned. 

The Cerro Gordo furnace men, says the Inyo 
Jndependent, since the establishment of the 
smelting industry have been dilligenily prose- 
outing experiments with a view to ascertaining 
exactly how to construct a furnace that will 
wear the longest and produce the best results. 
The annual increase of bullion testifies to their 
success; but of late some improvements have 
been introduced which seem likely to supersede 
all the old styles. Belshaw has in very suc- 
cessful operation what is known as a "water 
jacket," which is simply a double iron boiler, 
the inner one lined with fire clay, and between 
them is the water. Beaudry proposes substi- 
tuting a species of soapstone, found some five 
miles south of the town, for the molded fire- 
clay brick hitherto in use. The stone has been 
used in "patching," and found to stand the 
intense heat for a loDg time. 



From Altukas. — Hon. S. B. Dilly and lady 
have arrived from Rocky Bar; the latter will 
remain with her friends through the winter, 
while Mr D. will return after a short visit. The 
news which Mr. Dilly brings from Alturas shows 
a healthy state of affairs in that camp. He says 
they have a fair quantity of supplies, and the 
freight now on the road will get in, and they 
will have an abundance. There don't appear 
to be any idle men in the camp, as has usually 
been the caso during the winter. Dr. Newton, 
Superintendent of the Pittsburg company Col. 
Ward of the Valley company, Mr. Cavanaugh, 
of the Buffalo company, Mr Thomas, of the 
Wide TWst company and Jake Reaser &, Co. 
who own the Visbuu and have also leased the 
mines of "Waul & Bros., are each working 
about ten men, and the Pittsburg, Valley and 
Wide Wrst mills are running nearly all the 
time night and day with good results. — Idaho 
Statesman. 



From an Inventor. 

The following letter, which was recently re- 
ceived from an old client of Dewey & Co., now 
residing in one of the Eastern States, speaks 
for itself : 

Gentlemen: It was through your house that I se- 
cured my first patent, and although I hive since dono 
business here in the Atlantic States with the ablest pat- 
ent solicitors — gentlemen who have done me justice — yet 
I have often regretted that you were too far off to ad- 
vise with me in my cases. It has taken a longer time 
with every patent I have taken out since I left Cali- 
fornia and came East, than iu the cases you prepared 
for me In San Francisco, which is certainly very credi- 
table to you. 

By the wny, one of my patents has passed the ordeal 
which is the essential test of a patent's value. I mean 
that of a trial in the courts, and it stood the battling 
of one of th« best lawyers in the country. The speci- 
fications and claims were completely made out and 
there was a perfect comprehension of its principle dur- 
ing the trial. Since giving it this test we tuought that 
we would make it even stronger, if possible, and sub- 
mitted it to one of the best patent solicitors for advice. 
After a careful examination of tue case he advised us 
to let it alone as it stood, saying that whoever made up 
those papers understood their business. I then in- 
formed him that they were drawn up by Dewey & Co ., 
of San Francisco, and he replied that he knew yon 
very well by reputation. Very truly yours, 

L. L. Sawyer. 

Meridan, Conn., May 16, 1874. 



Truckee, Cal., July 10, 1874. 
Messrs. Dewey 4l Co.— Gen tlcmen.- My patent is just 
received, and is entirely satisfactory. Permit me to 
tender you my sincerest ihanks for the care and atten- 
tion, the promptness and interest you have displayed 
In managing my affairs. Gratefully yours 

0. F, McGlashan, 



DEWEY & CO. 
American & Foreign Patent Agents, 

OFFICE, 224 SANSOME STREET, 8. F. 

PATENTS obtained promptly; Caveats filed 
expeditiously; Patent reissues taken out; 
Assignments made and recorded in legal 
form; Copies of Patents and Assignments 
procured; Examinations of Patents made 
here and at Washington; Examinations made 
of Assignments recorded in Washington; 
Examinations ordered and reported by Tele- 
graph; Rejected cases taken up and Patents 
obtained; Interferences Prosecuted; Opinions 
rendered regarding the validity of Patents 
and Assignments; every legitimate branch of 
Patent Agency Business promptly and 
thoroughly conducted. 

Our intimate knowledge of the various in- 
ventions of this coast, and long practice in 
patent business, enable us to abundantly 
satisfy our patrons; and our success and 
business are constantly increasing. 

The shrewdest and most experienced InventorE 
are found among our most steadfast friends 
and patrons, who fully appreciate our advan- 
tages iu bringing valuable inventions to the 
notice of the public through the columns of 
our widely circulated, first-class journals — 
(hereby facilitating their introduction, sale 
and popularity. 

Foreign Patents. 

In addition to American Patents, we secures 
with the assistance of co-operative agents, 
claims in all foreign countries which grant 
Patents, including Great Britain, France, 
Belgium, Prussia, Austria, Victoria, Peru, 
Russia, Spain, British India, Saxony, British 
Columbia, Canada, Norway, Sweden, Mexico, 
Victoria, Brazil, Bavaria, Holland, Den- 
mark, Italy, Portugal, Cuba, Roman States, 
Wurtemberg, New Zealand, New South 
Wales. Queensland, Tasmania, Brazil, New 
Grenada, Chile, Argentine Republic, AND 
EVERY COUNTRY IN THE WORLD 
where Patents are obtainable. 

No models are required in European coun- 
tries, but the drawings and specifications 
should be prepared with thoroughness, by 
able persons who are familiar with the re- 
quirements and changes of foreign patent 
laws — agents who are reliable and perma- 
nently established. 

Our schedule prices for obtaining foreign pat- 
ents, in all cases, will always be as low, and 
in some instances lower, than those of any 
other responsible agency. 

We can mid do get foreign patents for inventors 
in the Pacific States froin two to six months 
(according to the location of the country 
6ooneb than any other agents. 

Home Counsel. 

Our long experience in obtaining patents for 
Inventors on this Coast has familiarized us 
with the character of most of the inventions 
already patented; hence we are frequently 
able to save our patrons the cost of a fruitless 
application by pointing them to the same 
thing already covered by a patent. We are 
always free to advise applicants of any 
knowledge we have of previous applications 
which will interfere with their obtaining a 
patent. 

We invite the acquaintance of all parties con- 
nected with inventions and patent right busi- 
ness, believing that the mutual conference of 
legitimate business and professional men is 
mutual gain. Parties in doubt in regard to 
their rights as assignees of patents, or pur- 
chasers of patented articles, can often receive 
advice of importance to them from a short 
call at our office. 

Remittances of money, made by individual in- 
ventors to the Government, sometimes mis- 
carry, and it has repeatedly happened that 
applicants have not only lost their money 
but their inventions also, from this cause and 
consequent delay. We hold ourselves re- 
sponsible for all fees entrusted to our agency. 

The principal portion of the patent business of 
this coast has been done, and is still being 
done, through our agency. We are familiar 
with, and have full records, of all former 
cases, and can more directly judge of the 
value and patentability of inventions discov- 
ered here than any other agents. 

Situated so remote from the seat of government, 
delays are even more dangerous to the invent- 
ors of the Pacific Coast than to applicants in 
the Eastern States. Valuable patents may be 
lost by the extra time consumed in transmit- 
ting specifications from Eastern agencies back 
to this coast for the signature of the inventor. 

Confidential, 

We take great pains to ' preserve secrecy in all 
confidential matters, and applicants for pat- 
ents can rest assured that their communi- 
cations and business transactions will be held 
strictly confidential by us. Circulars free. 

Engravings. 

We have superior artists in our own office, and 
all facilities for producing fine and satisfac- 
tory illustrations of inventions and machinery,, 
for newspaper, book, circular and other 
printed illustrations, and are always ready to 
assist patrons in bringing their valuable is- 
coveries into practical and profitable use. 

DEWEY & CO., 

United States and Foreign Patent Agents, pub- 
lishers Mining and Scientific Press and the 
Pacifio Rural Press, 224 Sansome St., S. P, 






i 

■v., 
b 

I 

E 









85 



January g, 1875.J 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



27 



The Mining and Scientific 
Press—Ever Onward. 



Our careful *fM*m of compiling, JuJtc.oiiH.y cod - 
dezulug, and conveniently arranging loco regular dc- 
p*rtm<nt«, hat. been Uoartily endurw-j. It renders Mlti 

paper worth nan to Aiders, wno cad tind handily Uut 
whKL ixjt.-r.-«t» them most. 
The weekly iMQL-t) of the Pbui will cohtain reliable 

Information for Practical Miners, 

Treating on tho Opening of Mines; Mining of Orea ; 
Hilling of Ores ; Smelting of Oren ; Separation and 
Boarting of Orea; Amalgamation ; Saving of Gold and 
ail precious MetaU : New Proceaw-8 of Metallur:'\ . N< w 
DhKorerlea of afinea ; Mining Engineering and Hy- 
draulic*. 

For Inventors, Mechanics and Manufac- 
turers. 

All new and Important development*) in Solentiflc 
aii<l M< 'hanlcal Progress; Patents and Inventions of 
the Paciiic States ; Pnigresu of Some Industrie ; Hints 
•or Local Manufacturers : Illustrations of N<w Ma 
ahlnery ; Report* of Popular Sclentlflo and Industrial 
Lectur'M. 

Our Mining Summary 

Given the progress of mining work from week to week 
Id the various counties and districts throughout the 
principal mining regions of the United States, arranged 
m alpbalietlcal OraST. It in the most extensive record 
of mining operations published in the world. It afforas 
the Intelligent miner a rare opportunity to know and 
iroflt by the work and experience of his neighbors. 
liners have few sources of practical luf urination in 
heir calling, and should onibrace every reliable means 
for improvement. Mining Operators and Shareholders, 
it home and abroad, weekly examine our Suninmry with 
Increased interest and profit. 

Our " Domestic Economy " 

Embraces new and important facts which should be 
Known in every cabin and household. Short and inter- 
wtlng — the articles onder this heading are freely read 
ind practiced with profit and Improvement to the read- 

!B. 

The Press is not strictly a " paper for professional 
ieientlhcmen,"but rather a 

Jberal and Popular Scientific Journal, 

Well calculated to make, practically scientific men from 
Intelligent masses. This is our stronghold for ac- 
»mplishing good. Plain, correct and pleasing language, 
■asily comprehended by all, confined mostly to short 
trttcles, is our endeavor. 

For Selfrlmprovement, 

Every issue of the Press abounds with articles of an 
ilevatlng character, to stimulate the higher virtues and 
mtures and progressive intellects of both men and 
ironies'. 

Hundreds of Dollars 

Lre oftentimes saved to the readers of this paper by a 
Ingle hint or article of information in its columns; 
inch instances have been repeatedly* reported to the 
idltors and proprietors during their long connection 
vith the Press. Onrpaper presents 

The New and Novel Developments 

n the progress of this comparatively new section of the 
Union (but recently settled and now rapidly increasing 
vith a population of tho most intelligent and venture- 
lome people, attracted from nearly every quarter and 
dime on the globe) , enable us, with due enterprise, to 
Ueplay vigor and freshness in our columns not met 
rith in similar journals elsewhere. The same oircum- 
tancea also render such a paper more especially valu- 
ble to its readers in a new, and, to a certain measure, 
in tried field, where the best methods aud processes of 
ndustry are not so well established or traditionally 
mown as in older communities. Published experiences 
if ten save costly experiments and disastrous results. 

I Great Variety of Industrial Information, 

n brief and fresh iorm, suited to the wants and tastes 
4 the readers of this coast, which is not obtainable 
itherwise so timely, or in so cheap and convenient 
orm. As an industrial publication, meeting the wants 
>f bo many kindred industries, this journal stands pre- 
iminent and without a precedent. 

Subscriptions payable in advance— $4 per annum 
Single copieB. pos*. paid, 10 cents. Address 



DEWEY & CO., 

fliNiNG and Scientific Pbess and Pacific 
■BuEiL Press Office, 224 Sansome St., S. F. 



opulation of the U. S— Census of 1870 



Jabama 99G 

.rkansas 484,i 

3alifornla 5b0,' 

Jonnecticut 537 

Delaware 125 

lorida .187 

Georgia 1,181 

llinola 2.539 

ndiana 1,680 

owa 1,191 

laneas 364 

Kentucky l-,ai21.. 

Louisiana 726, 

laine 626 

tfassachusetts 1,457 

Michigan 1,181 

Karvland 780 

Minnesota -.. 439, 

ffisssisippi 827. 

Hiesonrl 1,721 

Nebraska 122 

Nevada 42 

Sew Hampshire... .318 

Sew Jersey 906 

Sew York 4,382. 

Sorth Carolina 1,071 

3hio 2,665 



Oregon 90,923 

Pennsylvania 3,521,791 

Rhode Island 217.353 

South Carolina 7,05,606 

Tennessee 1,258,520 

Texas 818,579 

Vermont 310,551 

Virginia 1,225,163 

West Virginia 442,014 

Wisconsin 1,054,670 

r tal 38,113,253 

Territories. 

Arizona 9,658 

Colorado 39,864 

Dakota 14,181 

District Columbia. ..131,700 

Idaho 14,999 

Montana 20,695 

New Mexico 91,874 

Utah 86,786 

Washington 23,955 

Wyoming 9,118 

Total 442,730 

Grand Total 38,555,983 



i. Population of Some Foreign. Countries, ; 
Which Dewey & Co. Obtain Patents 
and Protection for Inventors. 



"Wood Cuts for Sale. 

We are willing to sell a large number of the wood 

cutB and electrotypes which have appeared in the 

Press, on very liberal terms to publishers abroad, and 

would invite correspondence on that business. 



3anada 3,537,887 

Ureat Britain 31,187,108 

France 36,583.559 

Belgium 4,839,094 

Prussia 24,043.902 

instria & Hung'y.35,943,692 

RuBBia 77,268,858 

Spain 16,031,267 

Italy 25,906,937 

3weeden 4,195,681 

(Norway 1,701,478 

Poland 5,317,362 

Denmark 1,726,724 



Baden 1.434 ; 

Bavaria 4,824 

Portugal 3,996 

Saxony 2,423 r 

Hanover 385, 

Wurtemburg 1,778 

Brazil 11,780. 

Chili 2,000 ; 

Peru 2,500. 

N.Grenada 2,794. 

India 191,000. 

Australia 1,500 

N.Zealand 326 ; 



uiisipess uirectory. 



01 LSI B. GK4I. aHL, M. uiVk.v 

Q-RAY & HAVEN, 

ATTOK»K\S ASOCOlNSKLOllS AT LA V* 

in Building of Pacific Insurance Co.. If." E. corner Call 

'ornla an < Le.dxsd.jrfl ttreeui, 

SAN FBAHOISOQ, 



JOHN ROACH, Optician, 

429 Montgomery Street. 
. W. corner Sacramento. 



(.JOSEPH GILLOTT'S 

STE EL PE NS. 
j Sold hj iili Dwlarf tbrough.Outtl.fl ffttrtd. 



HH-ifi-ly 



WU. BAttTLIMQ. 



U KURT KIMBjU.L 



BARTLING & KIMBALL. 
«OOKBINr>ERW, 

Paper Rulers and Blank Book Manufacturers. 

&OA Oluy .ii-.-.-i , (Kouthwest cor. Sansorael, 
I5v!2-Sm SAN FRANCISCO 



BENJAMIN MORGAN, 

Attorney at Law and Counselor in Patent Cases 

Office, 207 Sansome Street, S. F. 

Rofors to Dewey & Co., Patent Agents ; Judge 8. 
Heydenfeldt or H. H. Haight. 6v28-3m 



banking. 



The Merchants' Exchange Bank 

OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital, One Million Dollars. 

0. W. KELLOGO President. 

H. F. HASTINGS Manager. 

K.N. VAN BRUNT Cashier. 

BANKING HOUSE, 
No. 423 California street, Ban Francisco. 



Kototse Brothers, Bankers, 

12 WALL STREET, NEW YORK, 

Allow interest at the rate of Four per cent, upor 
daily balances of Gold- and Currency. 

Keceive consignments of Gold, Silver and Lead 
Bullior, and make Cash advances thereon. 

Invite Correspondence from Bankers,. Mining 
Companies, Merchants and Smelting Works. 



French Savings and Loan Society, 

411 Bush street, above Kearny BAN FRANOISOO 

4v27tf G. TffiAHE, Director. 




Ayer's Cherry Pectoral, 

For Diseases of tile Throat and Longs, such 
as Coughs, Colds, Whooping: Cough, Bron- 
chitis, Asthma and Consumption. 

The few composition 6, 
■which have won the confi- 
dence of mankind and be- 
come household words, 
among not only one, but 
many nations, muBt have 
extraordinary virtues. Per- 
haps no one ever 6ecuredJO 
wide a reputation, or main- 
tained it so long, as Ayer'b 
Cherry Pectoral. It has 
been known to the public 
about forty years, by a long 
continued series of marvel- 
Ioub cures, that have won 
for it a confidence in its vir- 
tues, never equalled by any other medicine. It still 
maltefi the most effectual cures of Cotfgks, Golds, Con- 
sumption, that can be made by medical skill. Indeed 
the Cherry Pectoral has really robbed these danger- 
ous diseases of their terrors, to a great extent, and given 
a feeling of immunity from their fatal effects, that is 
well founded, if the remedy be taken in season. Every 
family should have it in their closet for the remedy and 
prompt relief of its members. SicknesB, Buffering and 
evan life is saved by this timely protection. The pru- 
dent should not neglect it, and the wise will not. Keep 
it by you for the protection it affords by its timely use 
in Budden attacks. 

prepared by 
DR. J. C. AYEK & CO., Lowell, Mass., 
PRACTICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTS. 
Sold by all DruggiBts and dealers in Medicine. 

CRANE 4 BRIGHAM, Wholesle Agonta, 

V29-Iy BAN FRANC SCO . CAL. 



STEAM ENGINES AND BOILERS 

Of all sizes— from 2 to 60-Horse power. Also, Quartz 
Mills, Mining Pumps, Hoisting Machinery, Shafting, 
Iron Tanks, etc. For sale at the lowest prices by 

10v27tf J. HENDY, No. 32 Fremont Street. 



New Inventions I 

Of real merit, if brought plainly before the publio 
when fresh, are moot likely to become profitable to the 
patentee. For this reason, patentees (of worthy de- 
vices) should have the best of Engravings Made, and 
published in the Press. Superior Engravings Made, 
at reasonable rates, by artists in this offlc§- Pp-ti 



Machinery. 



N. Seibert's Eureka Lubricators. 




THE HIGHEST PREMIUM 

Awarded by the Mechanics' Institute Fair, San Fran- 
cisco, and State Fair, Sacramento, 1871. 
These Lubricators are acknowledged by all engineers 
to be superior to any they have ever used; feed con- 
stantly by pressure of condensed water, supplied by 
pipe A, regulated under tho oil by valve J, and forced 
out through check valve and pipe B into the steam pipe 
C; it then becomes greasy steam, passes to all the 
valveB and cylinder at every stroke of the engine; glass 
tube I indicates amount used per hour. Packing oa 
rodn and stems lastB longer, aud tho rini-'s on the piston 
will uot corrode. One pint of oil will last from three 
to six days, according to speed and' size of engine; T, 
sliding gauge; K, valve to Bhut off when engine stopps; 
H, F, valves to shut off in case of frost; Bteam does not 
enterthe cup; it is always cool; warranted t givetatis- 
faction. Patented February 14, 1871. Man facturedby 
California BraBs Works, 125 First street, S F. 24v23 



BALL'S* 

SWEEPING DREDGE, 

A NEW AND VALUABLE 

CALIFORNIA INVENTION, 

Has heen very lately well proven hy per- 
forming a job of dredging: at the mouth of 
San Antonio Creek, at Oakland, Cal. 

There is but this one machine that haB ever had these 
improvements employed. It is an old machine, for- 
merly built for another device, and is unfavorably con- 
structed for Ball's improvements; yet thiB first tempo- 
rary experimental machine has filled a scow of eighty- 
five cubic yards in sixteen minutes in unfavorable dig- 
ging. For durability, digging hard material and fast 
work, it has a reputation (supported by leading engi- 
neers) as having no equal. 

Testimonials and references will be given on appli- 
cation to the inventor, who is the sole owner of patents 
(excepting having made an assignment of the one ma- 
chine now belonging to the Central Pacific Eailroad 
Company) Having resolved not to sell any rights 
unless upon a basis of actual work performed by a 
machine built by myself for the purpose of fairly es- 
tablishing the worth of the invention,! therefore offer 
to sell machines or rights on the following plan, which 
is warranting the capacity of the machine by actual 
work; 

I will enter into an agreement with any responsible 
party to build and Bell a machine, scows and tender, 
all complete, and right of all my improvements in 
dredging machines throughout the Pacific Coast for 
£2u,000, warranting the machine to dredge six cubic 
yards per minute (to fill a scow at that rate) . $20,000 
will but little more than pay the coBt of building the 
machine, scows, etc., all complete; therefore I am pro- 
posing to ask notliing for my patents uoleBS my machine 
dredges more than Bis cubic yards per minute. But 
it shall be further agreed that in caBe (at a fair trial to 
be made within a stated time) the machine shall fill 
a scow at the rate of more than six cubic yiirds per 
minute, then $10,000 shall be added to the price above 
stated for each and every such additional cubic yard 
thus dredged per minute, and for additional fractions 
of a cubic yard thus dredged in the same ratio the 
$10,000 is ti be added to said price above stated. 

I will sell any other Territorial or State rights (either 
TJniied States or Foreign) upon the same plan and at a 
lower price proportionately than the rights for the 
Pacific Coast. 

I will sell a single machine with scows and all com- 
plete, and right to use the same in a limited territory, 
for $20,000 on the same plan as above stated, but will 
add only $2,000 to each additional yard over the six 
cubic yards per minute. Each machine is not to em- 
ploy more than two 10x20 inch engines. 

PaymentB to be made in U. S. gold coin on delivery 
of machine, as may be indicated by agreement. 



' Address, 



JOHN A. BALL, 

Oakland.- 



TWELVE COLUMNS OF PRICES EVERY WEEK. 



SAN FRANCISCO 

JOURNAL OF COMMERCE 

— AND— 

Weekly Price Current. 

NO MERCHANT SHOULD BE WITHOUT IT. 

XV. H. MURRAY, Rnminens Maanger, 
414 Clay Street. 



RELIABLE REVIEWS OF THE MARKETS. 



TVOJVPAIiEIL OIL. 

140 Degrees Fire Test, for Family Use. 

OWNERS OF MILLS AND MANUFACTORIES, your 
attention is particularly called to this beautiful and 
safe Illuminattno Oeu Its use is urgently recom- 
mended by the New York Fire ComimsBi oners and In- 
surance Companies. For sale to the trade in lots to 
BU it A. HAYWARD, 224 California St. 

19v28-3m 



JMalltijiy and Ores. 



JOHN TAYLOR & CO., 

IMPORTERS OF AND DEALERS IS 

ASSAYERS' MATERIALS 

Chemical Apparatus and Chemicals, 

Druggists' Glassware and Sundries, 

PHOTOGRAPHIC GOODS, ETC., 

512 suil 614 Washington street. SAN FRANOISOO 

We would call the special attention of Assayera 
Ohemlste, Mining Companies, Milling Companies 
Prospectors, etc., to our lurge and well adapted stock 

ASSAYERS' MATERIALS 

— AND— 

Chamical Apparatus, 

Having been engaged in furnishing these supplies Bine* 
the first discovery of mines on the Pacific Coast. 

1&~ Our Oold and 811ver Tables, showing the value 
per ounce Troy at different degrees of fineness, aud val- 
uablo tables for computation of assays in Grains 
Grammes, will be sent free upon application. 

7v25-tf JOHN TAYLOR ft CO. 



Varney's Patent Amalgamator. 

These I» uclil net. Siaml (in rivaled. 

For rapidity pulverizing and amalgamating ores, they 
have no equal. No effort has been, or will be spared 
to have them constructed in the most perfect manner 
and of the great number now in operation, not one has 
ever required repairs. The constant and increasing de- 
mand for them is sufficient evidence of their meritB. 

They are constructed so as to apply steam direotly 
into the pulp, or with steam bottoms, as desired. 

This Amalgamator Operates as Follows ; 

The pan being filled, the motion of the mtfller forces 
the pulp to the center, where it is drawn down through 
tho apperture and between the grinding surfaces. — 
Thence it is thrown to the periphery into the quicksilver. 
Tho curved plates again draw it to the center, where it 
passes dow^i, and to the circumference as before. Thus 
it is constantly paSBing a regular ilow between the grind- 
ing surfaces and into the quicksilver, until the ore is 
reduced to an impalpable powder, and the metal amal- 
gamated, 

Setlers made on the same principle excel all others 
They bring the pulp so constantly and perfectly in con- 
tact with quicksilver, that the particles are rapidly and 
completely absorbed. 

Mill-men are invited to examine these pans and setlers 
for themselves, at the office, 229 Fremont Street, 

San Francisc* 



Nevada Metallurgical Works, 

21 First street San Francisco. 



Ores worked by any process. 

Ores sampled. 

Assaying in all its brauches. 

Analysis of OreB, Minerals, Waters, etc. 

Plana furnished for the most suitable pro- 
ceBB for working Ores. 

Special attention paid to the Mining and 
Metallurgy of Quicksilver. 

E. N. BJOTTE. 

C. A. LTJCKHARDT, 

Mining: Engineers and Metallurgists- 

RODQERS, MEYER & CO.. 

COMMISSION MEBCHANTS, 

ADVANCES MADE 
O* all kind, of Ore., und partlcdlur tillcnllua 

PAID TO 

VONKlfiNUENTR OF «OOi9B. 

iv!6-3m 



LEOPOLD KUH, 

{Formerly of the U. S. Branch Mint, S. F.) 
Assayer and JSIetallnrgrloa^ 

No. Oil Comiuerclul Street, 

(Opposite the U.S. Branch Mint 

San Fhanoihco Oal. 7v?i-:tra 



California Assay Office— J. A. Mars & 

Wm.Irelan, Jr.,ChemietB and Assayers, Rooms 47 and 
48 Merchants' Exchange, San Francisco. Analysis of 
Ores. Mineral Waters. Etc. 8v28-Sm 



San Francisco cordage Company. 

Established 1856. 

We have just added a larce amount of new machinery o 
the latest and most improved kind, and are again prepared 
to fill orders for Hope of uny -special lengths and sizee. Con- 
stantly on lmnd alarge stock of Manila Rope, all sizes: 
Tarred Manila Rope ; Hay Rope ; Whale Line, etc., etc. 

TTJBBS & CO., 

de20 fill and 613 Front street, San Francisco. 



Glasgow Iron and Metal Importing Co. 

Have always on hand a large Stock of 

Bar and Bundle Iron, Sheet and Plate Iron 

Boiler Flues, Gasand Water Pipe, Cast 

Steel, Plow and Shear Steel. Anvils, 

Cumberland Coal, Etc- 

WM. McCRINDLE, Manager, 22 & 24 Fremont St., S. F. 

mfi-m2 

Buy Real Estate while at Low Rates. 

NINE WATER-FRONT LOTS, CHEAP, 
On Gift Map 4, 

Forming ahout half of a block fronting on the hroad 
ship channel of Islais Greek; will be sold so low as to 
make it an inducement to the buyer, Inquire for the 
owner at this office, bpti 



28 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



[January g, 1875 



The United States of Colombia. 

We had a conversation this week with a gen- 
tleman who has recently returned from, the 
United States of Colombia. He speaks hope- 
fully of the prospects of the Americans who are 
opening up the gravel mines in the interior. 
The gravel mines owned by Weaver & Co. are 
30 miles from Barbacoas, on the Nyambe 
river. They h*ve plenty of water for hydraulic- 
ing and have ono monitor at work, employing 
seven or eight men. The other mines are 15 
or 20 miles above Barbacoas, and a company of 
San Franciscans expect to take down the re- 
quisite machinery to work them. There are 
some five or six companies, some getting their 
claims inx>rder to work. Brown & Gentry have 
a large estate on which one monitor is at work, 
and three or four more will be added. These 
mined are on the Yacula river. The gravel is 
pretty good, and where water can be had. will 
pay well. Some of the gravel will pay hand- 
Bomely. Labor is pretty cheap and men can 
be employed for from 37% cents to $1 per day 
and board. Weaver & Co. p»y 37% cents and 
board for common men and $1 per day and 
board to drifters. Most of the companies have 
just started in and have done little as yet. On 
all the large estates the natives mine in a rude 
way for a share of the profits. All the mines 
pay well where the water can be brought on; 
some, however, have very little water. 

The gentleman who gave us this information 
brought up with him a number of articles from 
the country which are interesting. He showed 
us the Brazil nuts in the gourd-shaped cover in 
which they grew. Also, some "milk" of the 
India-rubber tree which grows up in the moun 
tains. He brought some coffee from the 
Cauca valley, which is of excellent quality; an 
American there has a plantation of 70,000 cof- 
fee trees which yield an average of 3% pounds 
to a tree. The coffee grows there plentifully 
and his trees are of such a growth that he is 
continually gathering, as some trees are in 
while others are out of season. The owner of 
this plantation also has 160 acres in sugar cane. 
This sugar cane takes 15 months to mature af- 
ter each cutting, the roots of course remaining. 
We were shown also from the Cauca valley, 
some exoellent wild cotton. This valley is 
about 48 miles from the. coast on an air line, 
and has an elevation of 3,000 feet. The cotton 
has a first-rate fibre. It has never been culti- 
vated there to any account. Our informant, a 
practical cotton grower and manufacturer, 
thinks the Cauca valley the best locality for an 
investment for a cotton mill there is in the 
world. The natives would cultivate the cotton 
if there was a demand for the product. A 
small cotton mill of 50 looms w ould do exceed 
ingly well, and our informant thinks it would 
clear $600 per day right along. Common cot- 
ton cloth, without print, could be sold there in 
quantities at 20 cents per yard. There is 
plenty of water power to run a mill and plenty 
of ground to be had to cultivate the cotton, and 
the product would meet with ready sale. We 
should judge from the figures shown us, that 
this favorable opportunity will not long lie idle, 
for some enterprising American will take it up. 
We were shown among other things several of 
the "ivory nuts" grown there, from which 
small articles are made. Also a species of 
cloth, resembling th* Kapa cloth of the Suuth 
Sea islauds, made from the inner bark of a 
tree. It is tough and thick, and in a cold cli- 
mate would do very well for clothing. Some- 
of the wood grown there is very hard and fine 
grained. 

There are no roads in the mining part of the 
country, except the trail from Barbacoas, all 
the travel being done in canoes or on the backs 
of Indians. The trail to the mines has been 
traveled for 30U years, and w •m down in places 
from ten to forty feet. The government is now 
building a road from Barbacoas to the interior 
80 miles long, 20 mile-; of it being finished, and 
200 men being at work on the rest. To the up- 
per mines they go by the trail. The road will 
give access to the mines so that horses can be 
used. To the Cauca valley there is a trail or 
small road, which is pretty good for this 
country. 

A ledge of silver ore has lately been discov- 
ered in the State of Caucdi in the foothills, 
which assays $50 per tou in silver and $6 in 
gold, 

The Mechanics' Institute Faik. — The Board 
of Trustees of the M ^hauics' Institute an- 
nouoce the opening of the next Mechanic*' Fair 
for the middle or August next. They have 
already commenced makiug arrangements for 
it. It is intended to make the horticultural 
diBpL.y one of the most marked features of the 
next exhibiion. The garden, which was ar- 
ranged last year by th Bay District Agricul- 
tural «ocit ty, will be flooded over and us*d for 
other purposes The lot adjoining the pavilion 
on the east, which has a frontage of 17U feet on 
Mission street and runs back to the boiler 
house, a distance of about 300 feet, will be laid 
out with walks, avenues, shady groves and 
fountains. 

The partnership of Conruy, O'Connor & Co., 
the well known hardware dealers in this city, 
has expired by limitation and tne entire inter- 
ests of the firm have been purchased by B. F. 
Dunham, E. W. Piayter, B. Hayden, W. L. 
MeCurmick un I A. Carrigan, who have been 
clerks and partners in the establishment for 15 
years. The new firm is known as Dunham, 
Carrigan <& Co, 



General News Items. 

Conobess. — A large amount of work is in 
preparation for Congress, during the recess 
and upon the reassembling there will be 
a rush of business as well as great politi- 
cal activity. The Arkansas Investigation Com- 
mittee's report will then be forthcoming; to be 
followed soon after by the reports of several 
select committees now in various sections of the 
Souih and the Civil Eights bill must be acted 
upon shortly, as it i^at tbe top of the pile on 
ihe Speaker's table. The new finance bill 
comes up by ppecial order on January 7th. 
The Senate Caucus Committee will make their 
report on cheap transportation. The Com- 
mittee on Appropriations expect to have the 
remaining Appropriation bills completed by 
the time of re-assem ling, and their considera- 
tion will be press* d upon the House fortwith; 
indeed, all the most i nportant subjects are in 
such a shape as to to presented almost simul- 
taneously for action. 

The Spanish Revolution. — A very sudden 
termination has been given to tbe Spanish He- 
public, by the proclamation of the son of ex- 
Queen Isabella, as King of Spain, under suoh 
circumstances as secured his immediate recog- 
nition by almo t the entire army and navy and 
a large majority of the leading civilians 
throughou the country. Even Ca^tell <r, it is 
understood, with other leading Republicans, 
gives in his adherance. There- seems to have 
been a very general impression that nothing 
else could restore that distracted country to 
tranquility. The European Governments ap- 
pear to be very well satisfied with the result, 
and will recognize the accession of the young 
Prince of Astaria to power, as soon as he ar- 
rives and assumes the reigns of Government, 
which will be in a few days. The Prince is 
now about 16 years of age, but well educated 
and possessing a full understanding of the re- 
sponsibility he is assuming. 

Tereiele Explosion. — Two miners were in- 
stantly killed in the Sutro tunnel on the 30th 
ult., and a number of others seriously injured 
— one fatally. The accident was of quite a sin- 
gular native, and should be studied and borne 
in mind by all persons using nitroglycerine : 
It happened at the time of changing shifts, and 
a blast was about to be exploded in the face, or 
header, of the tunnel. The men retreated 
back about Rix hundred feet, where the battery 
used in exploding blasts was situated. Several 
boxes of giant powder had been left near the 
battery, and when the blast in the header was 
touched off, the powder near the battery also 
exploded, by what means is not fully under- 
stood. 

The Pacifie Mai' investigation makes slow 
progress. The testimony thus far looks bad 
for somebody, and especially for Mr. Consres- 
sional ex- Po*i master King. A Washington 
Rpecial says: If the testimony given in New 
York concerning Mr. King proves true this 
gentleman has subjected himself to the punish- 
ment attached to perjury, since in his examina- 
tion before the committee in tbe last Congress, 
he testified then lhat he did not receive one 
dollar, either directly or indirectly, in behalf of 
the subsidy schemes. Efforts are evidently be- 
ing made on the part of certain persons to 
cover things up. 

Theown Fbom a Wagon and Killed. — The 
body of A. Koscoe, a farmer, about 70 years of 
age, residing about a mile from Sheridan, Pla- 
cer county, was found Friday morning on the 
plains, north of the Rancho de Passo. The 
jury of inquest decided that he was killed by 
being thrown from his wagon. 

Gaeibaldi. — After all that has been said and 
done Garibaldi cannot be induced, even in his 
poverty, to accept of aid from any Bource — 
either public or private. He has just refunded 
ihe substantial aid which the Italian Govern- 
ment offered him, on the plea that that the 
finances of the Government were suffering. 

Cold Weathee. — Halleck station, east of 
Elko is said to be the coldest point on the Cen- 
tral Pacific railroad. The mercury went to 9 
degrees below zero there a few days since. 
Considerable floating ice from above was seen 
in the Yuba river at Marysville, yesterday 
something unusual in that region. 

Fiee in the Tules. — During last week the 
tules on the Sacramento river, directly west of 
Marysville, were on fire, giving forth lurid 
flames at night, and clouds of smoke during 
the day time, when viewed from Sacramento 
city. 

Spontaneous Combustion:. — Some wool in 
the Oiegon woolen mill at Portland took fire 
from spontaneous combustion, last week, but 
was extinguished before much damamage re- 
sulted. 

The Beechee-Tilton Case. — Five hundred 
witnesses were subpoenaed for the Beecher- Til- 
ton case which went to trial on Monday. It is 
said that Beecher received 1,000 calls on New 
Years. 

Vabqtjez. — The trial of this noted bandit com- 
menced on Tuesday last. The law's delay 
could not be forced any farther. 

Deaths peom Famine. — Accounts from Asia 
Minor show that distress from the famine is in- 
creasing, and that many deaths occur daily. 

New Postmsstee at Quinoy.— T. F. Hersey 
has been appointed postmaster at Quincy. 



Industrial Items. 

OrjE Building Industbies.— The value of 
houses erected in this city during the past year 
cannot be less than five millions of dollars. 
The total number of workmen employed during 
the year in the building trade has not averaged 
less than 3,000, who with their fmilieB, etc., 
represent not less than 10,000 of the city's 
population. There is no sign of any decrease 
in the number, as at the present moment not 
lflss than 400 houses are in course of construc- 
tion in various parts of the city, and the incom- 
ing year is regarded as likely to be more active 
for the building business than even the last. 

Manufacturing of every description is flou- 
rishing in this city and State as never before. 
The mills, the boot and shoe manufactories, 
the manufactories of case goods, and, in fact, 
every description of industrial productions are 
increasing their number of employes. The 
increase in this direction in this city during the 
past year has been over 1,000 hands. We are 
just entering upon a new year with most extra- 
ordinary evidences of prosperity. 

The foundaries and machine shops in this 
city were never more busy than now, on ac- 
count of the demand from the mines for ma- 
chinery and house work in this city. 

Another Palace. — Milton S. Latham has 
made a large purchase of property ou the south- 
east corner ot Pine and JoneB extending down 
to Bush street. He means to build a fine city 
residence there. 

The last spike of the railroad from Saucel- 
lito to Tomales was driven on the 29th ult., 
and the road will soon be open for travel. 

Mebced City is moving for a flouring mill. 

The Nevada Legislature met a' Carson on 
Monday last, was duly organized and listened 
to tbe message of Governor Bradley, which is 
a plain, straightforward document, presenting 
a most encouraging account of the general con- 
dition of the State, particularly in relation to 
the State finances. The net indebtedness of 
Nevada is next to nil — aggregating only $84 - 
164, with a school fund in the treasury amount- 
ing in round numbers to $250,000. The 
assessed value of real and personal property iu 
the State is $26,866,605, with a revenue for 
State and county purposes of $930,888. The 
Republican members of both Houses met in 
convention on Wednesday, and ur animonsly 
nominated Mr. Sharon for U. S. Senator, 
which is equivalent to an electioDbya large 
majority over all competitors. Subsequent to 
the nomination Mr. Sharon received the con- 
gratulations of his friends at his rooms in the 
Ormsby house. The Leeistature is now pre- 
pared to enter upon tbe business of tbe session, 
which will doubtless be a short and successful 



Impeovfd Concenteatoe — Mr. John Viu- 
cent, familiarly kuovvn as the "One-eyed Scis- 
sors-grinder," who keeps a stand o'nighta on 
the corner of Pine and Kearney streets, be- 
sides being a poet and scissors -grinder has also 
proven himself to be an inventor. He has 
invented a dry ore concentrator for which he 
has applied for lettarB patent, through the 
Mining and Scientific Peess Patent Agency. 
The machine is very ingenious and appeals 
more than ordinarily effecive. When Mr. 
Vincent gets his patent we will favor our read- 
ers with a description of bi« concentrator. 

Hot Watee. — The watar encountered in the 
main east drift of the 2000-foot level of the Im- 
perial mine, is the hottest on the Comstock. 
The temperature, carefully noted, was found 
to be 150% degrees. 



patents & Inventions. 



A Weekly List of U. S. Patents Is- 
sued to Pacific Coast Inventors. 

[Fbom Official Repoets fob the Mining and Scien- 
tific Pbebb, DEWEY & CO., Publishers and 
U. S. and Foreign Patent Agents.] 

By Special Dispatch, Bated Washington. 
D. C, Jan. 5th, 1875. 

Fob Week Ending Dec. 22d, 1874.* 
Habbow.— David T. Gillis, Stockton, Cal. 
Gbatn HEADEB.^David T. Gillis, Stockton, 

Cal. 
Animal Teap. — Gamos Richardson, Sun .ToBe, 

Cal. 
Safety Pin.— Lucy Emma Andrews, S. F., 

Cal. 
Wateb Gauge foe Steam Boilees. — Charles C. 

Redmond, San Jose*. Cal. 
Chuck.— William F. Foothaker, S. F., Cal. 
Distilling Spieits. — Bobert C. Brooks, S. F., 

Cal. 
Locking Latch. — Henry Rogers, Eureka, 

Cal. 

Tbademaek. 
Foe Boots.— S. W. Rosenstock & Co., S. F., 

Cal. 

*The patents are not ready for delivery by tte 

Patent Office until some 14 days after tbe date of issue. 
Note. — Copies of TJ. 8. and Foreign Patents furnlBhed 
by Dewey h Co., in the shortest time possible (by tel- 
egrapbor otherwise) at the lowest rates. All patent 
business for Pacific coast inventors transacted with 
perfect security and in the Bhortest time possible. 



Woodward's Gabdens embraces an Aquariam, Mu- 
Beum, Art Gallery, Conservatories, Tropical Houses, 
menagerie Seal FoudB, and Skating Bink. 



[Business Notice.] 

Mining and Scientific Press- 

' A VALUABLE WEEKLY FOR 

Miners, Mechanics and Manufacturer | 
on the Pacific Coast. 

Volume XXX of this first-class, standar i 
journal commences with the year 1875. 11 j 
proprietors, having the successful experiencj 
of ten years publication of the Peess, have n i 
hesitation in saying that for the ensuing yet-} 
the paper shall, in keeping with the time. ' 
reach a higher mark of merit than ever befon 

With oar own printing press, folding mi 
chine, 

Able Editors, Correspondents, 

And skilled woikmen in different departmen 1 
of our now extensive and growing establish 
ment, we mean to print a journal throughou 
the year, which all citizens, whether patroi 
or not, may be proud of seeing published an., 
supported on this side of the ccntinent. 

No kindred journal in America furnish* ■ 
more real 

Fresh, Novel, Interesting Information; 

In its volumes than the Mining and Scikntifh 
Press We have the 

Largest Mining Field in the World 

To report from. It embraces tbe largest variei 
of mines and mining; methods of working; ar 
eiomnumerous wonderful discoveries than ai 
other section of the globe." It is the birth plai 
of mnny of the 

Latest and Best Inventions in Golf 
Silver and Labor Saving, 

With brief, reliable, well chosen and prepare- 
editorials; varied and condensed correspond' 
ence and selections; tables and statistics au( 
ranged for ready reference, 

Superior Illustrations, 

Of local and general interest to its readers, ,,' 
forms a weekly journal of individual charactc 
and unrivalled worth to its intelligent and in 
dustrial Patrons at home and abroad. It is til' 

Leading Mining Journal of America, 

And in its practical, interesting and substantial 
make up, it is unrivalled by any mining 1 1 
mechanical journal in the world- 

Home Manufactures and Home Invei 
tions 

Will be constantly encouraged. Both help 
build up the brain and material wealth of tt 
country. They are kindred to our individuit 
enterprise. Our interests are mutual with eif 
home aitizans and producers. Where on tl.' 
face of the globe do inventoes and Mandfa^ 
tueees either need or deseeve more encourage 
ment? 

Its Value to the Community, 

In disseminating important information; dist: 
pating false notions; checking expensive follieJ 
instigating important enterprises ; by wise eou: I 
sel and scientific direction, enriching the rewart ; 
of honest labor, we are annually saving ar 
adding 

Millions of Dollars 

To the products of our country. The Pbe> 
has already 

A Large Circulation, 

And is deserving of more universal patrons), 
from those whose interests it specially repi 
sents. This sparsely populated portion of U 
Union is a difficult one for publishers to pi 
sent the claim of their journal iu to all wl 
should subscribe. In these times of seeming 
cheap (but largely, trashy and worthless) jot 
nalism, it is desirable and proper that tho 
who know the real merits of a faithful journ 
should 

Speak and Act in its Favor. 

We Bhall not spare our efforts to make soui 
and improved issues, maintaining constant 
the rights of all, and forwarding the materr 
and intellectual rights of our patrons, and 
our sturdy, progressive community. 

Necessarily, scientific and mining public 
tions generally are costly and high priced, b j 
considering the size, character and location 
our publication, our rates are favorable for 
valuable a print. 

We invite correspondence from all sectior: 

Subscription.*, payable in advance, $4 a yet 
Single copies, postpaid, 10 cents. 

AddresB, DEWEY & CO., 

Publishebs, No. 224 Sansome St., S. F. 



January 9, 1875.! 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



29 



The Nerw Oregon Minks. — Speaking of the 
new qu«rtz niiues in Southern Oregon, the 
Times, of Jacksonville, Bays: "A late dispatch 
from Rock Poiut aayB J. L. Colvig and James 
Birdaeve have just arrived at this place from 
the new quartz mines. They say the road is 
lined with men and pack-trains going to the 
land of gold and silver. The great Mammoth 
ledge is abont 180 fret in widih at a poiut 
wht-ru the Rogue river has worn its way 
through to a depth of BOO foe*. About 200 
claims are now tuken up. It has been traced 
for twenty niilt-a through a very rough coun- 
try. Guides get from $10 to $20 a day to truce 
the lead. Colvig sayB he crushed a few pounds 
of the ore, and it averaged ten cents per pound 
in gold. A town has aprunt; up in a few weeks. 
It is to be known as Mammoth City. Hotels, 
feed stables, Bhops and other buildings are going 
"P-" 

Thb first be ils of cowl were discovered in 
Wahhii gton Teriitory in 1852, and since that 
time coal has been discovered in all parts of the 
Territory west 1 f the Ctscade range. 

Onk hundred aud fifteen mining locations 
were recorded during 1874 by the Recorder of 
Tuolumue county. 



Fatal Infatuation.— Do not as you value your life* 
entertain tin- Idea that a cough 1b one ni those casual 
affection* which require but little atte tibn. This -pe- 
at infatuation itt fatal Jo thousands. A cough 1b 
th>- Brat sit. n;»r.' uf consuuipTion — renit-niber that. An- 
afjillato the dan^r by extiuKuiHiiing he complaint 
The means await yon at .very drug store. Hate's 
Honey of Borekound and Tar will, in every im-tance, 
iflbct a perfect cure of the threatening niltuetit without 
caUfinu n lUhOa. for It 1b pl'.usaut to the palate as well 
an Infallible. 

ike's Tooth- Arhe Drops — Cure In one minute 



Pacific Machinery Depot ! 

H. P. GREGORY, 
Empire Warehouse, 

Bcale »tr«»ot, near Market, 

San Francisco. Cal. 



METALS. 



Wednesday m., Jan. 6, 1875. 



American Pin Iron, ? ton . 
Scouih Pig Iron, 1* urn.... 
Whit* Pi«, » too. . 



. 42 00 



(g 46 00 
■t, 16 (Ml 
■a) 16 W 
@ 16 OH 
3S 



Oregon Pig.? ton.. 

Refined Bar, bad assortment, "ft lb 

Renned Bar, good aaBortmeni.fi lb 

Boiler. No. 1 to 4 

Plate, No. 5 to S 

Sheet, No. 10 to IS @— 5L 

Sheet, No. M to 20 - - g - »S 

Sheet, No. 24 to 27 -; « 9 ~ °9 

Horse Shoes, per keg. » 7 sn ® a ■ 

Nail Rod • ■ — '» 

Norwajklron — j 

Rolledlron — 6 tt 

Other Irona for Blaokamitha -Miners, eto. ® — 4'i- 

^Bra^.er*' * - 31 @ - 32 

OopperTin'd — « @-~ 

SheatbfniMJ"*'- 8 "" 21 

Sbeaihing. vellow a — 25 

Bheathir.vOld Yellow -- f - 12* 

Oo'ip^ 11 " 00 Nails — 24 @ 

R0oe^ O8lt ' on B olta —24 :m 
flatus.— 

a tee, Charcoal, IX 'H box 13 00 (3 15 10 

Plates, I O Charcoal 13 00 @ 14 50 

Rootlnjt Platea 12 5" (3) 15 00 

Banca Ti o, Slaba, *Hb — 82,^® - 33 

iTEEL.— English Oast, 1» lb — 2ll (5) — 25 

Anderson A Woods* American Cast @ — 16* 

Drill (Q) — 16!i 

Flat Bar — 18 @ — It 

Plow Steel — 9 tfiT— '0 

■ISO @ — II 

Zmo, Sheet — <3 — 11* 

JaILb— Aa^orted sizes , 4 25 @ 8 00 

IOTPKCTT.Vrrt pftr -v — — (fo 15ft 



& 



W. T. Q-ARRATT. 

AC I T Y 
Brass and Bell Founder, 

Corner Natoma and Fremont Streets, 

MANTTFAOTURKRa OF 

Brass, Zino and Anti-Friotion or Babbet Meta 

CASTINGS, 

Church and Steamboat Bells, 

r.WERN AND I. AND BEI.I.S. OOM1S, 

FIEE EN0IHES. F0R0E AND LIFT FDHPS. 

Steam. Liquor, Soda, Oil, Water and Flange Cocks, 
rad Valvee of all deBcriptioDe, made and repaired. 
Boae and all other Joint*, Spelter, Solder and Cop- 
per Rivets, ete. Gauge Cocks, Cylinder Cocks, Oil 
Ulobes. Steam Whistles. HYDRAULIC PIPES AND 

St NOZZLES lor mining purposes. Iron Steam Pipe fur- 
nished with Fittings, etc. Coupling JointB of all sizeB. 
Particular attention paid to Distillery Work. Manufac- 
;urer of " Garratt's Patent Improved Journal Metal." 
O-Highest Market Price paid for OLD BELLS, COP- 

;,ol| PER and B RASS. 6-tf 

■t[f 



i'i- 



PURE OAK-TANNED 
LEATHER BBI/TINQ 

AT THE 

PACIFIC MACHINERY DEPOT, 

H. P. GREGORY, 

Beale Street, near Market, San Francisco. 




Our AufiUr.. 

Odb Frikndb can do much in aid of oar paper and the 
cause of practical knowledge and aclence, by assisting 
Agents in their labors of canvassing, by lending their 
influence and encouraging favors. We Intend to send 
none but worthy men. 

Ooas. T, Bkix— Alameda , Santa Clara and Santa Cm.-. 
Counties. 

J . W. Aitdebsoh— Orange and Santa Ana, in Lob Angeles 
County, Cal. 

J. O. Kellkt— For Washington Territory. 

B. W. Crowkll — California. 

F, B. ALDEitaoH— City agent, San Francisco. 

J. L. Tharp— Southern California. 

0. H. Whi:i:i,hb— Southern California. 

A. C. Champion— Tulare, Fresno and Inyo Counties. 

1). J. J am ks— Australian ColonleB, 

J. 0. Ewino— Contra CoBta County. 

John Kostran— Sonoma County. 

J. W. Riley— San Joaquin and Stantlfllana Counties. 

W. C. Qoinbt. Eastern and Western States. 



Milling and Other Companies. 



Calaveras Hydraulic Mining Company. 

Principal place of business, San Francisco, California. 
Location of works, Calaveras county, Stato of Califor- 
nia. 

Notice is hereby (riven, that at a meeting of the Trustees 
of said 'orapany held on the Tih day of Deoi'inbor, 1H74, 
an aasessment of five (M cents per abare watt levied upon 
the capital dteck of Maid Comp >ny payable immediaU-ly, 
in United Staius ffOtd coin, to the Secretary of th Com- 
I'.in in tbe otHce of the l'ni-ed Suites InLernnl Collec- 
tor. No. 'Sil Batleo' »< r eet, San Franoiseo, California. 

Any stock upon which thin autieinment shall regain un- 
paid "ii :\ii 11 il .y. in- ninth dny of .lanuary, l.- 5. Bliullbc 
delinquent, and advertised for aale at public auction, and 
nnl<'-- payment is made befon-, will be Bold nn Monduy, 

ibe iw.-niy-fi th Ciftth) diy of Januarv, LJ73, to pay the 
elinguout aosusament, together with QQSts of advertising 
and expenses .if sale. .aBRAM SHEAR. Secretary. 

Office. No 321 Battery street, iotflce of_the U. S. Inter- 
Franc ac 



Gold Mountain Mining Company— Loca- 
tion of works, LoWer Rancherie, Amadof t'ouutv, < nl. 
Notice is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board ef 
TruBtcea of i^ald Company held on the 4tn day of Jannary, 
l-. >, an ;i---i' -stiicm of twentv-Qve cents per share was 
levied upon the vapital stock ol aaid Com pan \ . payable 
iniiiit-.il., fly. in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, 
.it HtiLeidesUorn* street 

Any itock upon which this assessment shall remain un- 
paid on tbe bth day of February. 18>&. shall be deemed 
•U-hmiucnt, and will be duly ndvurti^ed for sale at publia 
auction, and unless payment ahull be made before, will 
be sold on Saturday, the '21st day of February, i675, to 
pay the delinquent asses«ment together with costs of 
advertising and expem-es of Bale. By order of the Board 
of Trustees. 

W. AUGS. KNAPP, Secretary. 
Office.— 116 Leldesdorff street, San Francisco. 



"Golden Rule" Silver Mining Company — 

Principal place of business, San Franoiseo, Olifnrniu 
Looatlon of workf. Ophir 1 Mining District, Utah Terri- 
tory. 

Notice Is hereby given, that at a meeting of the 
Board of Dir. ct-rs held on the 8 h dav 01 December, 
inj.aniMea-nientof nvecaniBpertbarewas hvicd upon 
the ca 1 al -tock of the corporation, jiayablu immediaiely 
in Unted stiitesgold und silver coin to the SccreUrv 
No. MU C^ay streei. S.in Francinco, California. 

Aa\ stock upon which thi- a at-sBino t slmll remain un- 
paid on the fifteenth day of January. 1S7A, will be delin- 
quent, and advertised for sale at public auction, 
and unless nuymi-nt be made before, will bo sold on 
Monday, ttie fifteenth day of Fcbruurt , 187'., ^• pay the de- 
linquent assessmoni. together with costs of advertising 
and expenses of sale. 
«««*«, K - WKRTHEIMER, Secretary. 

Office, 630 Clay street, San Francibco, t al. 



nal Revenue Collector,; San 



.■ sco, Cal. declfl-lt 



J. A. Fay & Do'a Woodworkingf Machinery. 
Blake's Patent Steam Pumps. Tanite 
Co> Jfimery Wheels and Machinery, 
fitchburg: Machine Co's Machin- 
ists' Tools, Edson'a Recording- 
Steam G-aug-e, Triumph Fire 
Extintruisher. 
Also on hand and for Sale: 
STUltTEVANT'S BLOWERS AND EXHAUST FANS, 
JOHN A. ROEBLING'ii SONS' WIRE ROPE, PURE 
OAK TANNED LEATHER BELTINO, PERIN'8 
FRENCH BAND SAW BLADES, PLANER 
KNINES, NATHAN & DREYFUS GLASS 
OILERS, AND MILL AND MINING SUP- 
PLIES OF ALL KINDS. 
P. 0. Box 168. 



J. D. Yost. Saa Francisco. H. S. Cbocbbb, Sacramento 



H. 8. CROCKER & CO., 



IMPORTING STATIONERS 



General Job Printers. 



401 and 403 Sanaome St., S."'F- 



PARTICULAR ATTENTION PAID TO 



Manufacture of Blank Books. 



BANK AND INSURANCE WORK 



A SPECIALTY. 



23v8-3m-16p 



California Beet Sugar Company.— Loca- 

tion of principal place of busine-r., San Francisco, Oal- 

fornia. L c&ltun of works, Soquol, Santa Cruz County, 

Ca Ifornia. 

Notice it* hereby civon, tfaatat a meetimcof the Board of 
D>rectora, held on the Wd day of Deci mber, IttH, iin a^- 
S4>BAinent of Five Dollars pi r share wan levied upon the 
oapit'il stock of thu u rporation, payable immediately in 
Uniiod States gold coin, to the hec-retary, at the office 
of tbe Company. 314 California strest, S.<n Francison, • ni. 

Any stock uuon which this aaaussniont snail remain un- 
paid on the 31st <<ay of Janua y, 1S75 will be delinquent 
and advertised for Bale at jinulic auction, and unless 
payment is made before, wi[< bo sold on the 21st duy of 
February, 187a. to puy the delinquent assessment, together 
with oosie of advertising and expenses ol sale. 

LOUIS iKANCOM, Secretary. 

Offioe, No. 314 California street, San Franoisao. Cal. 



Geneva Consolidated Silver Mining Com- 

§anv. Principal place of b'leiness. City and County of 
an Franoi-co, Stme of Caltfornii. Location of works, 
Cherry Creek Mining District, White Pine County, Ne- 
vada. 

Notice is hereby civen that at a meeting of the B >ard of 
Directors, held on the 2d day of Januiry, 1875. a assess- 
ment of twenty cents p r share was levied upon the 
capital etnek of the corporation, puyable immediafblv. In 
United St.itee uold coin, to the ecr. tary, at the office 
of the Company, Room 14, 3U2 Montgomery street, San 
Francisco. 

Any stock upon whi'-h this assessment shall remain un- 
paid on the 8th day of February, 1875, will be delinquent, 
and advertised lor sale at public auction, and unless pay- 
ment is made before, will be sold on Monday the first day 
of Marob, 1875, to pay the delinquent asse-ement, together 
with cosis of advertising and excesses of sale. 

I. T. MI LLIK1N. Secretary. 
Office— Room 14. No. 302 Montgomery street, S. F. 



of 




THE BIRMINQHAM SHOVEL. 
These Shovels have No Rivets nor Straps. 



The blado Is made or ona piece of BEST SOLID OAST STEEL, 
the blade and shank beiDg one piece. 

THEY WILL WEAR TWICE AS LONG 

As the ordinary shovel. They are the STRONGEST, BEST and 
CHEAPEST SHOVEL EVER MADE. Examine the engravings care- 
fully and yon can see how they are made. 

THEY NEED ONLY TO BE TB.IED 

To prove their value. ^"Prices same 'as ordinary shovels. Ask 
for the BIRMINGHAM SHOVEL. Take no Other. 

.TEEADWELL & CO., Sole Agents for Pacific : States, 



2v8-eo , w-bp 



San Prancif/oo, Cal- 



Electric Mining Company— Location 

Principal placeof business, San Franoiseo, Cal. 
Notice — There are delinquent upon the following 
described stock, on account of assessment, lev- 
ied on the twenty-eighth day of November, 1874, the 
several amounts set opposite the names of the respec- 
tive shareholders, as follows: 
Names. No. Certificate. No. Shares. Amount. 

Geo Hasen 31)1 

C J Rader 302 

J Rader 324 

C J Rader 330 

JRader 331 

C J Rader 332 

T B Wingard Trustee 320 

T B Wingard Trustee 322 

TB Wingard Trustee 326 

TB Wingard Trust?e 327 

T,B Wingard Trustee 347 

J B Houghton 90 

J B Houghton 91 

J B Houghton 392 

J B Houghton 202 

J B Houghton. 314 

Wm R McCaw 348 

John Mullen 158 

G W Malone 66 

GW Malone 67 

GW Malone 58 

G W Malone 69 

G W Malone CO 

li W Malone 177 

G W Malone 206 

OWTerrill 61 

JMEllBworth 178 

G W Mullen Trustee 88 

■6 Vf MnllinTrustee 604 

iVirb Annie Woods 76 

Mra Annie Woods 131 

Mrs Annie Woods 280 

vi rn Annie Woods 303 

Mrs Annie Woods 318 

.vlrs Annie Woods 346 

Herbert Eastwood 102 

Herbert EaBtwood 224 

HWolleb, Trustee 105 

G Wolleb, Trustee 113 

E Wolleb, Truutee 114 

B Wolleb, Trustee 115 

E 'Wolleb, Trustee 116 

S Wolleb, Trustee 117 

E Wolleb. Trustee 118 

fi Wolleb, Trustee 119 

E Wolleb, Trustee 121 

E Wolleb, Tru-tee 122 

E Wolleb, Trustee 123 

E Wolleb, Trustee, 124 

E Wolleb, Trustee 294 

W Clayes 14S 

ioseph White 164 

Joseph White 166 

Joseph White 255 

Louisa Thompson 239 

Henrietta Grant 240 

Wm. H. Sharp 163 

Wm. H. Sharp 241 

M. G. Rader 317 

J. B. WeBton 183 

J. B. Weston 308 

J. W. Wesson 257 

J. W. Wesson 313 

And in accordance with law, and an order of the 
Board of Directors, made on the 28th day of November, 
1874, bo man/ shares of each parcel of said Stock ac 
may be n< cea ary, will be sola at public taction at the 
lalesroom of Maurice Dore & Co., No. 326 Pine street, 
San Frant sco on the 26tu day of January, 1875, at the 
iimrof 12 o'ol .ctt.M.of said day. to pay said delinquent 
ssessment tuereon, together with costs of advertising 
and expenses of the sale. 

T. B. WINGARD, Secretary. 
Office— Room 13, No. 318 California streat, S. F. 



300 


16 00 


160 


7 60 


1060 


53 00 


300 


15 00 


100 


5 00 


1200 


60 00 


1000 


50 00 


60 


2 50 


100 


5 00 


400 


20 00 


2826 


J41 25 


50 


2 60 


25 


1 25 


41 


'2 05 


a 


a«c 


476 


23 75 


160 


7 60 


760 


37 50 


50 


2 50 


60 


2 60 


50 


2 50 


50 


2 60 


50 


2 60 


1O00 


50 00 


187 


9 35 


500 


25 00 


60 


2 60 


100 


6 00 


160 


7 611 


100 


6 00 


500 


26 00 


650 


27 60 


147 


7 35 


300 


15 00 


600 


30 00 


60 


2 60 


7 


35 


25 


1 25 


100 


5 0C 


100 


5 0C 


100 


6 0C 


100 


6 0C 


100 


6 0C 


100 


5 0C 


100 


5 0C 


60 


2 51 


100 


6 0C 


100 


5 00 


60 


2 5C 


188 


6 9C 


600 


25 0C 


260 


12 51 


250 


12 50 


75 


3 75 


.60 


3 0C 


60 


3 0( 


100 


5 0C 


15 


75 


1700 


85 00 


75 


3 76 


25 


1 25 


175 


8 75 


125 


6 26 



Keystone Quartz Mining Company— 

Location of principal pla<e uf business, San Francis- 
co, California. Location of works, Butte Township, 
Si»-rra County, California. 

Notice. — TLere aro dellnqnent upon the following 
described stock, on «ccoiint ol' •HoeBsn cnt hvied on 
the tenth duy of November, 1874. thi- Fevr-rul ntni'unta 
«et i'p osita the names of the resptctive share huldt-rH, 
as follows: 

Nunx-s. No. Certificate. No. Shares. Amount. 

OH Simpkins 37 1248 $1248 00 

J Clem Lhler, trustee 86 500 600 00 

J Clem Dhler, trustee 67 274 274 00 

And in accordance with law, and an order of the 
Bo»rd of Directors, made on the tenth day of Novem- 
ber. 1874, so many shares of each parcel of Baid stock 
as niuy be necessary will be sold at public auction, at 
the salesroom of John Middleton & Son, No. 310 Mont- 
gomery street, San Franctnco, on the ekventh day of 
January, 1875, at the hour of one o'clock P. m", of 
said day, to pay said delinquent assessment thereon, 
together with costs of advrtiBing and expenses of Bale. 
LoUIa VESARIA. Secretary. 
Office— Northwest corner Sansome and Pine BtreetB, 
San Francisco, Cal. dec26<3t 



Orleans Mining Company— Location of 

principal place of buaines ', Man Frmoisoo, Cal. Loca- 
tion of worka, Gra^a Va ley Township, Nevada County. 
O.1 1. 

Notice is hereby siven, that at a meeting of the Trus- 
teeabeldoo the tth day ol January, 1875, an fiBHessment 
(No. 2) of one dollar (91) per share was levied upon the 
capita' Btnckof the co p>>ratiun, payable Immediat. ly n 
United Slat' s gold coin, to the Secretary, at the office 
of the Company, Room 8, Jl5Californi.i sireet, San Fran- 
cisco, C"l. 

A y aiook U'>on which this bsb sament ahall remain nn- 
"nid on the 9th day of February, i8T>, will he delinquent 
aiuladvf>ril ed for sale at public am. ti n. mU unles pay- 
1:1 -li ie made before will «e sold on Tvesd.iy, tbe 2d 
day of Mm ch, 1875, lo pny the delinquent a-ses-sment, to 
getl»er with costs of advertlning auil eKpenses of sale. 

J. F. NESMITH. Secretary. 
Office-Room 6, No. 315 California street, S F. 



Page Tunnel Company.— Locaion of 

£11 opal place of hii- ini'.-.M, Sau Francisco, t alifornia. 
ocation 01 works, Big Cottonwood District, Salt Lake 

County. Utah. 

Notice is her by given, that at a meeting of the Direc- 
tors, held on the l2tn day of December, 1874, an saesa- 
tnent of Jive cento per share was levied apon the caoital 
stuck uf the unrpi ration p<yabie immediately in IJuired 
States gold coin, to the Secre ary, ai the office o( the 
Company, Room 1, Sa. 4U8 Oaliiormu utrect, San Franoiseo 
Cali for Din. 

An> *toek npo-a -which this assessment shall rem -tin un- 
paid on the 20th day of January, 1875, will b« delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at imblic auction. .>nd onles- pay- 
ment is made before, will be -o il on the 20th day of Feb- 
ruary, 1875, to pay the delinquent aa<-es^ment, together 
wnli costs of advertising and expenses of sale. 

JAOuB HARDY, Secretary. 

Office. Room 2, No. 4<& California street, San Francisco, 
California. decliMt 



Theresa Mill and Mining Company. 

Locution of principal place of business, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. Location of works Coulterville District, 
Mariposa county, Cal. 

Notice.— There are delinquent upon the following 
deecribed stoek, on account of assessment No. 1, levied 
on the 25th day of November, 1874, the several amounts 
Bet opposite the names of the respective shareholders, 
as follows: 
Names. No. Certificate. No. Shares. Amount. 

Cornell, Richard 74 100 $60 

Carnell, Richard 87 60 26 

Carnell, Richard 88 ' 60 96 

Coulter, Mary Ann 2 100 3 60 

Coulter, Mary Ann 3 100 60 

Donovan.M.J 183 600 260 

Ellis, Fred N 187 100 60 

Finck, George 128 300 160 

Finck, George 133 200 100 

Gillan, James S 160 1000 600 

Hickox, B. F 139 25 12.60 

Hickox, B. F 140 25 12.50 

Lamar, T.D. 3 134 100 60 

Lamar, T. D. S 135 100 60 

Lee.R.H 163 100 60 

McFadden, John 14 100 60 

McFadden, John 15 100 50 

McFadden, John 16 100 60 

McFadden, John 20 60 25 

McFadden, John 23 60 25 

McFadden, John ...27 50> 25 

Quinn.John 4 200 100 

Riley.H.K 181 60 25 

Shelden, Mark 159 1000 500 

Stewart, John 130 100" 60 

Stewart, John 131 100 60 

Taylor, D. W ...124 500 250 

Taylor, D. W 125 1000 600 

Taylor, D. W 126 1000 500 

Tripp.J. W 141 50 26 

Tripp, J. W 142 50 26 

Tripp.J. W 144 ' 25 12.50 

Tripp.J. W 145 25 12.60 

Tripp, J. W 146 25 12.50 

Turnock, Joseph 136 60 25 

Wainwright, Wm 165 255 127.50 

Whalen, John *. 41 100 60 

Whalen.John 48 100 60 

Whalen, John 61 50 25 

And in accordance with law, and an order of the 
Board of Directors, made on the 25th day of Nov- 
ember, 1874, so many shares of each parcel of said 
stock" as may be necessary, will be sold at public auc- 
tion at the office of the Company, 408 California street, 
Room No. 16, on Friday, the 15th day of January, 1875, 
at the hour of 12 o'clock, m., of said day, to pay 
delinquent Assessments thereon, together with costs 
of advertising and expenses of sale. 

B. F. HICKOX, Secretary. 
Office, Room 16, 408 California street, San Francisco, 
•at. 



30 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



[January g, 1875. 



Ij-op apd fflachijie torts. 



San Francisco Boiler Works, 

123 and 126 Beale Street SAN FRANCISCO 

H. I. CUBBY, 

Late Foreman of the Vulcan Iron Works,) Proprietor 




High and Low Pressure Boilers of all 
Descriptions. 

BOLE MANUFACTURERS OP THE CELEBRATED 
SPIRAL BOILER. 

SHEET IRON WORK of every description done 
at the Shortest Notice. 

All kinds of JOBBING and REPAIRING promptly 
attended to. 17T25-3m 

TUB BISDON 

Iron and Locomotive Works, 

INCORPORATED APRIL 30, 1868. 

CAPITAL $1,000,000. 

LOCATION OF WORKS: 

Corner of Beale and Howard Streets, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

Manufacturers of Steam Engines, Quartz and Flour 
Mill Machinery, Steam Boilers (Marine, Locomotive 
and Stationary ) , Marine Engines (High and Low Pres- 
sure) . All kinds of light and heavy Castings at lowest 
prices. Cams and Tappets, with chilled faces, guaran- 
teed 40 per cent, more durable than ordinary iron. 
Directors : 



Joseph Moore, 
Wm. Norris, 



Jesse Holladay, C. E. McLane, 

Wm. H. Taylor, J. B. Haggin, 

James D. Walker. 



WM.H. TAYLOR President 

JOSEPH MOORE.. .Vice-President and Superintendent 

LEWIS R. MEAD Secretary 

2JvlT-qy 



FULTON 

Foundry and Iron Works. 



HINCKLEY & CO., 

WiKDri.0TDSEK8 OF 



stisjlm: engines, 

Quartz, r*lo\ir ana saw Mllle, 

II i ye*' Improved Steam Pump, Brodlc's Im- 

proved Crusher, Mining Fnmpa, 

Amalgamators, and all kinds 

Of Machinery. 

N. E. corner of Tehama and Fr jmont streets, above How- 
street, San Francisco. 3-qy 



PACIFIC 

Rolling Mill Company, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Established for the Manalactnre of 

RAILROAD AND OTHER IRON 

— AFB — 

Every "Variety oi ©hatting^, 

Embracing ALL SIZES i f 
Steamboat Shafts, Cranks, Piston and Con- 
o. necttng Sods, Car and Locomotive Axles 
and Frames 

— ALSO — 

HA-MMETIED IRON 

Of every description and sizs 

0&- Orders addressed to PACIFIC ROLLING MILL 
COMPANY, P. O. box 2032, San Francisco, Gal., will re- 
ceive prompt attention. 

a®- The highest price paid for Scrap Iron. 



SHEET IRON FIFE. 



Risdon Iron and Locomotive Works 

Corner Howard and Beale Streets, 

Are prepared to make SHEET IRON AND A8PHALTTJM 
PIPE, of any size and for any pressure, and contract to 
lay the same -where wanted, guaranteeing a perfect 
working pipe with the least amount of material. 

Standard sizes of railroad Car Wheels, with special 
patterns for Mining Cars . These small wheels are made 
of the best Car Wheel Iron, properly chilled, and can be 
fitted up with the improved axle and box— introduced bv 
this company, and guaranteed to outlast any other 
wheels made in this State. 

*y All kinds of Machinery made and repaired. 



24v22-3m 



JOSEPH MOORE, Superintendent. 



The Phelps 7 Manufacturing Co., 

(Late S. P. Screw Bolt Works. 

MANUFACTURERS OF AL L KINDS OF 

Maokine Bolts, Bridge Bolts, and Ship or 
Band Bolts. 

13, 15 and 17 Drnmm Street, San Franoisco. 4v241j? 




PARKE & LACY, 

SOLE AGENTS FOE THE 

Burleigh Rock Drill Comuany, 

— MANUFACTTTKEnS OF — 

PNEUMATIC DRILLING MACHINES, 

AIR COMPRESSORS AND OTHER MACHINERY. 



Also, Farmers' Dynamic Electric Machine and 

Hill's Exploders for IBlagting, Putnam Ha- 

L chine Company's Tools, Wright's Steam 

Pumps and Haskin's Engines. 

Address 

FA-RISIIE <fc. LACY, 

2iv28-3m-nd C 310 California St.. S. F. 





We have the test and most 
complete assortment of 

Machinists' Tools 

In the Country, 

Comprising all thoBe 

used in 

MACHINE, LOCOMOTIVE, 

AND 

R. R. Repair Shops. 

K?r*For Photographs, Prices and Description, etc., 
address 

r NEW YORK STEAM ENGINE CO., 

No. 4 Car "Wheel Borer. OS Chambers Street, New York* 

15v28-eow-ly 



UNION IRON WORKS, 
Sacramento. 

ROOT, NEILSON & CO., 

MAK07AOTUF.EC;; OF 

STEAM E1VGJ1V3ES, BOILERS, 

CROSS' PATENT BOILER FEEDER AND SEDIMENT 
COLLECTOR 

Dunbar' s Patent Self -Adjusting' Steam Piston 

PACKING, for new and old Cylinders. 

And all bind* of Miointc Machinery. 

Front Street, between X and O ■tro*t». 

Sachamento Oitt. 



OCCIDENTAL FOUNDRY, 

137 and 139 First street SAN FRANCISCO 

STEIGEB & BOLAND, 

IRON FOUNDERS. 

IKON CASTINGS of all descriptions at short notice. 

Sole manufacturers of the Hepburn Soiling Pan 
and Callahan Grate Bars, suitable for .Burning 
Screenings. 

Notice. — Particular attention paid to making Supe- 
rior Shoes and Dies. 20v26.3m 



California, Machine Works, 

119 BEALE STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 
BIRCH, ARGALL & CO., 

Builders of QUARTZ, SAW AND FLOUR MILLS 

Keating's Sauk Printing Presses, 

The Eoonobtt Hydeauxio Hoist foe Stones, 

And General Machinists. 25v28-3m 



THEODORE EALLENBEEQ. 

MACHINIST, 

arid Maker of Models for Inventors. All kinds of Dies 

Stamps and Punches made. Also, all kinds of 

Small Gears Cut. 

Repairing done on very Reasonable Terms and in the' 

best' manner. No. 32 Fremont street, S. F. 19v23-3m 



McAFEE, SPIERS & CO., 

BOILEB MAKERS 

UNO GKSiiUAL MACHINISTS, 

Howard 'st., between Fremont and Beale, San Francisco 

Miners' Foundry and Machine Works, 

CO-OPERATIVE, 
First Street, bet. Howard and FolBom, San Francisco 

Machinery and Oastiniro of all kinds. 



THOMPSON BROTHERS, 
JStJItEItA FOUNDRY, 

129 and 131 Beale street, between Mission and Howard, 

San Francisco. 

LIGHT AN » HEAVY CASTINGS, 

of every deaoriptlon, manufactured. 2%vlBor 



CALIFORNIA BRASS FOUNDRY, 

STe. 185 First •treet, opposite Minna, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

All kuids of Brass, Composition. Zinc, and BabbittMeta 
Castings, Brass Ship Work of all kinds. Spikes, .Sheathing 
Nails, Rudder Braces, Hinges, Ship and Steamboat Bells ano 
Gongs of superior tone. All kind so f Cocks and Valves, Hy 
draulicPipes and Nozzles, and Hose CouptinRS and Connec- 
tions of all sizes and patterns, furnished with dispatch 
JS- PRICES MODERATE. -£# 
J. H. WETST*. V. KINOWELL. 



G. W. PEESCOTT. 1 "W. R. Eokart. 

Marysville Foundry, 

MARYSVLLLE, _-__--_-- CAL. 

PEESCOTT & ECKART, 

Manufacturers of Quartz and Amalgamating Machinery, 
Hoiaiing Machinery, Saw :ind Grist Milt Irons, House 
Fronts. Car Wheels, and Castings of every de- 
scription made to order. 
Bteam Engines constantly on hand for sale. 9v28-ly 



Vallejo Foundry and Machine Works, 

VALLEJO, CAL. 

JOHN L. HBALD, Proprietor. 

Manufacturer of Flour and Saw Mills, Stationary 
and Portable Ste,am Engines, Pumps, etc. Boilers 
built and repaired, and all kinds of Iron and Brass 
Castings furnished at short notice. 



TO COPPER SMELTERS, BLl/E-STONE 

& SULPHURIC ACID MANUFACTURERS. 



For sale or to lease the LEVIATHAN COPPER MINE, 
in Alpine county, California. 

The ore, which is in the form of Bilicate, black and 
red oxide, and gray sulphide, with metallic copper 
finely disseminated, averages from two to five feet 
thick, and 15 to 50 per cent, copper. A few parcels 
taken out during exploratory operations, realized £30,- 
000 for Bluestone. In sight, 2,000 tons 20 per cent, ore; 
on dump, 300 tons 15 percent.. Supply inexhaustible. 
Title perfect. ■ Minimum present capacity, 10 tons per 
day, which may be extended indefinitely. Cost of ex- 
traction, $2. There is also a siratnm of sandstone 20 
feet in thickness, impregnated with 26 per cent, pnre 
sulphur. .To a coin purchaser highly advantageous 
terms will be offered. For further particulars apply to 
Leurs Chalmers, Silver Mountain, Alpine county, Cal. 



Diamond Drill Co. 

The undersigned, owners of LESCHOT'8 PATENT 
for DIAMONDPOINTED DRILLS, now brought to the 
highest staro of perfection, are prepared to fill orders 
for the IMPROVED PROSPECTING and TUNNELING 
DRILLS, with or without power, at short notice, and 
at reduced prices, Abundant testimony furnished of 
the great economy and successful working of numerous 
machines in operation in the quartz and gravel mines 
on this 1 coast. Circulars forwarded, and full informa- 
tion given upon application. 

A. J. SEVERANCE & CO. 
Officii, No. 316 California street, Rooms 16 and 17. 
21v26-tf 



pteam hppp. 




PARKE 

& 
LACY, 

Sole Agents for 
■WEIGHT'S 

BUCKET- 
PLUNGER 

SteamPump, 

ALWAYS 
BELIABLE 



THE SELDEN 

DIRECT-ACTING STEAM PUMP, 

A. CARE, Manufacturer & Proprietor. 



Patented 




Combining simplicity and durability to h remarkable 
degree. Its parts are easy of access, and it -n adapted to 
all purposes for which Steam Pumps are usea. 

As a Mining Pump it is Unsurpassed. 

— ALSO — 

STEAM, GAS & WATER PIPE, BRASS WORK STEAM 1 
& WATER GAUGES, FITTINGS, ETC. 

CAER PATENT STEAM KADIATOK. 

Send for Price LiBt and Circulars. Address, 

A.. CA.HH, 

10v28-ly 43 Courtland Street , New York 



SANBORN & BYRNES, 




Mechanics)' Mills, Mission Street, 

Bet. First and Fremont, San Francisco. Orders from 
the country promptly attended to. All kinds of Stair 
Material furnished to order. Wood and Ivory Turn- 
ers. Billiard Balls and Ten Pins, Fancy Newels and 
Balusters. 25v8-8m-bp 



Froisettvs New Sectional, Topographical 
and Mineral 

MAP OF UTAH. 

Size, 40 by 56 Inches ; Scale, 8 Miles to an Inch, 

Handsomely engraved on stone, colored in counties 
and mounted on cloth, showing the Counties, Towns, 
Rivers, Lakes, Railroads, Mines and Mining Districts 
throughout the Territory, and all Government Subveyb 
made to date. Price, mounted, $8: Pocket form, $5, 

— ALSO— 

New Mining- Map of TJtan, 
Showing the boundaries of the principal mining dis- 
tricts, some 30 in number, adjacent to Salt Lake City. 
Price, pocket form, $2.50. 

—ALSO— 

Froiseth's New Map of Little Cottonwood 
Mining: District and Vicinity. 

Showing the location of some 400 mines and tunnel 
sites, together with the mines surveyed for U. S. Pat- 
ent. Price $3. For sale and mailed to any part of the 
globe, on receipt of nrice, by A. L. BANCROFT & CO., 
A. ROMAN & CO., and LeCOONT BROS. & MANSUR, 
San Francisco. 10v25-tf 



£Very Mechanic 

Should have a copy of Brown's 

607 MECHANICAL MOVEMENTS, 

Illustrated and described. 

Inventors, model makers and ameature mechanics 
and students, will find the work valuable far beyond 
its cost. Published by Dewey & Co., Patent Agents 
and publishers of the Mining and Scientific PreBB. 

Price, post paid, $1. 



Brittan, Holbrook & Co., Importers of 

Stoves and Metals, Tinners' Ooods, Tools and Machines; 
111 and 11 - California St., 17 and 19 Davis St., San Fran- 
eisoo, and 178 J St., Sacramento. r»r -'y 



*!:■.; 



January g, 1875."] 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



31 



IMPROVED HOISTING ENGINES. 




HOISTING ENGINES. 



OOOK, RYME-* k 00/8 Celebrated Hoisting Engines have been too long 
In use on the Paeitio Coast to require any special recommendation from us. 
We refer with confidence to any one of the hundreds now in u*-e. We simply 
state that they still sustain their old reputation, the manufacturers uut 
having followed the now too common practice of reducing the quality of 
material and workmanship for the sake of competing with cheaper engines. 
For ilc-tailn of Bisoi send for price Hat. We desire to call particular attention 
to our new 

MINING HOISTING ENGINES. 

(Manufactured by the same parties.) 

Which have ju«t heen introduced on this Coast. The plans and specifications 
are the cuinbtned efforts of oun most successful mining enoineebs, and the 
result is the most complete 

DOUBLE-DRUM HOISTING ENGINE 

Ever built. Their advantages will be seen at a glance by any one familiar with 
the necusj-itles of a mine. One of these engines may be seen at work in the 
Belcher mine, and one in the Ophir, on the Comstock lode, to both of which 
we refer. flSTWe have all sizes of theBe engines constantly on hand. For 
Bale only at 

TREADWELL & CO.'S, 



23vI0-eow-tf 



San Francisco, Cal. 




fflipipg J/lachipery. 



STEEL SHOES AND DIES 

FOR QUARTZ MIIVLW, 

Mado by onr improved pro- < 
Bj». After many years of 
put 1'iit research and experiment 
wc nave succeeded in producing 
si 1.1 L shoes AMD DEE8 for 
QUARTZ 

MILLS 
which an 
HIM ■'infilled J 

for 

Strength, 
Durability, 




Economy 



Will wear three tines longer than any iron Shoes 
BUILDERS AND CONTRACTORS 

Of Quartz Mills, Pans, Separators, Concentrators, Jigs, 
Hydraulic Itock Breakers, Furnaces. Engines, Boilers 
end Shnftiug, and general Mining Machinery in all its 
details and furnishers of Mining Supplies. 
All orders proudly filled. 

MOREY & SPERRY, 

88 Liberty street, N. Y. 
Examination solicited. 9v28«ly 



EAGLE IMPROVED CHLORINIZING AND 
DESULPHURIZING FURNACE. 



(Patented July. 1873.) 




Hooker's Patent Direct Acting Steam Pump 

W. T. GARRATT, 

Cor. Eremont & Natoma 

streets, S. F., 
Sole Proprietor & Manu- 
facturer for the Pacific 
Coast. 
SIMPLE, CHEAP AND 
DURABLE. 

Adapted for all pur- 
poses for which Steam 
Pumps are used. 
The Best Pump in Use. 

B^ SEND FOR CEROULAR 

N. B. — Also manufacturer of Hooker's Deep Well and Double-Acting Force Pnmp. Received the Silver 
Medal awarded at the last Mechanics' Fair in San Francisco. 18v27-2am3ni 




The Cheapest and Most effective Furnace now in use 
Parties desirous of building above furnace, or for any 
information on same, address, 

I. T. MTLLIKEN, 

i31 No. 302 Montgomery St., room No. 14, S. F. 



CROCKER'S PATENT 

TRIP HAMMER QUARTZ BATTERY, 



VERY IMPORTANT 



TO MINERS AND MILL MEN. 



Silver-Plated Copper Amalgamating Plates for Saving Gold, 



Of all Sizes and in any Quantity, Furnished to Order. 



FULL INSTRUCTIONS -SENT FOB OPERATING THESE PLATES. 



Over fifty prominent Mills and MineB have already been furnished with these plates. Particular attention given 
to plating goods for Buiders, Plumbers, etc. Hotel and Restaurant -work replated. 



SAN FRANCISCO GOLD AND SILVER PLATING WORKS, 



653 and 655 Mission Street, 



E. G-. DENNISTON, Proprietor- 



SAN FRANCISCO 



25v29-lam-3m 




This machine, complete, weiphs 1.500 Idb. Has an iron 
| rauie, five steel arms with stamps weighing 17 lbs. each, 
" icb all ike 2,0iU blows per minute, in a mortar provided 
llwlth screens on buth sides, and crushes fine 600 lbs. per 
IbOur, requiring one-liorae power to drive it. Has been 
Hthnrnushlv tested, and is guaranteed to give gond satis- 
faction. PRICE. $i'-00. 

G. D. CROCKER, 



17v2G-tf 



315 California street. San Francisco. 



Stamp Mill For Sale at Ophir Canon, 

jjSye County, Nevada. Midway between Austin and 
IjBelmont, belonging: to the Twin River Consolidated 
Mining Co. A complete mill, comprising; twenty(20) 
1001b stamps, (dry-crushing) with Rock Breaker. Pans, 
tettlers, and entire outfit of milling appliances; 
together with an excellent engine (18x42) , two tubular 
ooilers and all requisite Bhafting, gearing, belting, &c; 
i valuable lot* of Sierra Nevada timber in Battery 
'rames and building. The whole is offered cheap. For 
further information apply to JAS. D. HAGUE. 
I8 v 27-3m 240 Montgomery St., S. F 



Improved Cast and Forged Steel Shoes and Dies for Quartz Mills. 

-[PATENTED MAT 26TH, 1874.] 
Price Reduced to 16 Cents Per Pound. 
San Francisco, November 10th, 1874. 

To Supls. of Quartz Mills and Mining Men generally: 
We take pleasure in stating that owing to the rapid 

increase in our orders, our Pittsburg Manufacturers 

have been compelled to add largely to their works — 
a new gas furnace and heavier trip hammer — and are 
thus enabled to reduce the cost of tteel and at the 

same time produce Shoes and Dies superior to any yet 

manufactured. We have consequently reduced the 

price to 16 cents per pound and solicit atrial order, 

guaranteeing that you will find them at least 10 per 

cent- cheaper than the best iron. There are no Steel 

Shoes and Dies made excepting under our patent and 

sold at this office, or by our authorized agents, though 

certain Eastern manufacturers advertise Steel Shoes 

and Dies which are only cast iron hardened by the 

addition of a composition. They will not out-wear two 
sets of common iron, though called steel. Tbey are 
very brittle and are not capable of being tempered, 
flying from under the hammer like cast iron. Our 
Steel Shoes and Dies are in ut-e in many of the largest 
mills on the Pacific Coast, and all who have tried them 
pronounce them cheaper and far superior to iron in 
every respect, even at the old price of 20 cents per | 
pound. Their advantages over iron arecbeapneBB on first 1 
cost, increased crushing capacity, time saved in chang- J 
ing and in setting tappets, increased value of amalgam r& 
by absence of iron duBt and clappings, and a saving of j<jj 
75 per cent, in freight. It takes 50 days to fill orders 1 
from the manufactory East. Price 1G cents per " 
pound shipped at San Francisco. Terms liberal. 

with dimensions, to 

OAST STEEL SHOE & DIE CO., Room 1, Academy Building, S. 





TEATS' PATENT FURNACE 

For Roasting*, Desulphurizing, Chloridizing 
and Oxidizing Ores, etc. For the reduction of 
Gold, Silver, Lead and other ores, saving a larger per- 
centage, at less cost, than any other invention now in 
use. Chloridizing Silver Ae more thoroughly, in leas 
time, with less fuel, salt and labor; also roasting Lead 
ore preparatory to smelting, better and cheaper than 
any other invention. The Furnace is so constructed 
that one man, of ordina/y ability, teudB five or more 
furnaces; controls them with ease; adding heat or air; 
stopping or starting at will; charging and discharging 
with ease. Also, Patent 'Conveying Cooler," for con- 
veying and cooling roasted oreB, heating the water for 
amalgamation and the boilers at the same time. Saving 
the large space in mill (covered with brick or iroii), 
and the labor of two men per day, exposed to the pois- 
onous chlorine gaBes. Also, Patent Air Blast "Dry 
Kiln." for drying ores direct from the mine or breaker, 
Baving fuel and labor heretofore necessary in drying 
ores for dry pulverizing. For description refer to 
Mining and Scientific Phess, No. 18, October 31, 1874. 
For particulars addresB 

TEATS & BREED, 

No. 12 West Eighth Street, Cincinnati, Ohio 

Circulars, &c, will be furnished, if required. 
18v29-3m 





"WATER TANKS of any capacity, made entire 
by machinery. Material the best in use;constmctio 
not excelled. Attention, dispatch, satisfaction. Cos 
less than elsewhere. 

"WELLS, RUSSELL & CO., 

Mechanics' Mills, Cor. Mission & Fremont Streets. 
3v28-3m-sa ____ 

BLACK DIAMOND • FILE WORKS. 




G. & H. BARIVETT, 

Manufacturers of Piles of every Description 

Nob. 39, 41 and 43 Richmond 6treet, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Sold by all the principal hardware stores on th 
Pacific Coast. 18v25.1y 



; 



32 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



January g, 1875.' 



BLAKE'S PATENT STEAM PUMP-MORE THAN 7000 IN USE. 




Hand Power 



MINING PUMPS, 
TANK PUMPS, 
MARINE PUMPS, 
FIRE PUMPS, 
Plunger PUMPS, 
SUGAR PUMPS, 
OIL PUMPS, 

Brewry PUMPS, 
Tannery PUMPS, 
Irrigating PUMPS, 
FARM PUMPS, 
;ACID KUMPS. 
Wrecking PUMPS 
FEED PUMPS. 




Send for our large 



The BLAKE PUMP may be seen in many o£ the principal mines of California and Nevada More than 7,000 have been sold and I we refer to any one found in use. 
and handsomely Illustrated Catalogue giving prices and details of over 100 different sizes. A large stock of all sizes on hand at the Machinery Depot ot 

San Francisco. 



TREADWELL 



1874.' A GRAND SILVER MEDAL.§ 1874. 




The highest and only prize of its oluas given to any 
Vertical Engine was awarded to the 

HASKINS ENGINES AND BOILERS, 



MASS. CHARITABLE MECHANICS' ASSOCIATION, 

at their F.air in Boston, in competition with the 

Baxter, New York Safety Steam Power 
and the Sharpley Engines- 



N. W. SPATJLDING, 

Saw Smithing and Repairing 

ESTABLISHMENT. 

Nob. 17 and 19 Fremont Street, near Market. 




MANUFACTURES OP 

SPA.UJL.DINGt'SS 

Patent Tooth Circular Saws, 

They have proved to he the most du able and economi- 
cal Saws in the Wond. 

Each Saw is Warranted in every respect. 

Particular attention paid to construction of 

Portable & Stationary Saw Mills. 

MILLS FDRNISHED AT SHORT NOTICE 
At the lowest Market Prices. 



DUNHAM, CARRIGAN & CO., 

SUCCESSORS TO 

CONROY, O'CONNOR & CO., 

IMPORTERS OP 

53iA.ttJD-W-A.tttt, IIROlsr, STEEL 

AND OTHfcR METALS, 

107, 109 and III FRONT STREET, 

lOS, 110 and 112 PINE STREET; 

SAN FRANCISCO, CA3L,. 



2v30-finl-eow 



GIANT POWDEB. 

Patented May 36, 1868. 

THE ONLY SAFE BLASTING POWDER IN USE. 

GIANT POWDEB, NO. 1, 

For hard and wet Rock, Iron, Copper, etc., and Submarine Blasting. 

GIANT POWDEB, NO. S, 

For medium and seamy Rocfc, Lime, Marble, Sulphur, Coal, Pipe Clay and Gravel Bant^Blasting, Wood, etc. 
Its EXCLU8IVE use saves from 30 to 60 per cent, in expenses, besides doing the work in half the time 
required for black powder. 

10- The only Blasting Powder used in Europe and the Eastern States. 

BANDMANTT, OTELSEN & CO., 
v22-3ml6p General Agents, No. 210 Front Street. 



THE PACIFIC 

REDUCTION WORKS. 



GUIDO 



Superintendent. 



KUSTEL, 

WTXL PURCHASE GOLD AND SILVER BEARING ORES, CtTPERIFEROTJS SILVER 
ORES, GOLD STJLPHTJRETS, ETC., AT THE HIGHEST RATES, OR "WORK 
THE SAME; FOR ACOOTXNT OF OWNERS. 
Office, SIO Front street, San 



ITVaiicisoo. 

• 4v29-6m-16p 



Cazin's Combination Gre-Sizer and Con- 
centrator — One Plunger System. 

[Covered by Letters Patent of July 2d, 1872, and recent 
applications.] 

Containing a sizing apparatus, (revolving screen) de- 
livering two or lour sizes of ore to two or four rows of 
sieves, each row independent of the other, and each 
having 6 sieves, each row concentrating according to 
specific gravity the Bpecial size automatically fed unto 
it, resulting in the simultaneous continual delivery of 
separated materials, working 2d and 3d-cl,iSb ores into 
lst-class ores*of perfect cleanness. It thoroughly sep- 
arates native gold or copper from quartz or any other 
lode matter;— galena and silver sulphurets from 
pyrites, baryta and quartz; and pyrites from quartz. 

Added to a battery of stamps these machines consti- 
tute a full system of ore concentration, sufficient in 
most cases for the requirements of western mines, with 
a capacity of 15 or 20 tons per 24 hours. 

For particulars apply to, 

F. CA2IN, M. & C. E. 
Supt. Denver Concentration and Smelting Co. 

At Denver, Colorado, Lock-Box 2225, or corner of 
Blake and 32d itreets, ag8-16p 



MAGAZINES. 



Harper's 

Atlantic 

Godey 

New York Ledger, . . . 

Blackwood 

Hours at Home 

Good Words 

Peterson s 

Arthur 

Lady e Friend 

Harper's Weekly 

Chimney Corner 

Literary Album 

London Society. 
All the Year Round. 
London 111. News 



3 00 

5 00 

6 00 
15 00 



W. E. L00M1S, 
Ne^ws Dealer 

AND STATIONER, 

S. E. corner of Sansomc &nd 

Washington streets, 

BUPPLEEB AIL 

Eastern Perodicals 

BT THE 

Year, Month, or Numb 



PACIFIC MACHINERY DEPOT. 

H. P. aiiGOBT, 
Sole Agent for the Tanite Go's 

EMORY WHEELS AND MACHINERY, 

Empire Warehouse, Beale St., near Market, S. F. 



Mxkebb write for your paper. 



ADAPTED TO. EVERY SITUATION 

«v / yys/.Vs ?^/o r-y 



GE0.P. HLAKS MFC CO. 



in. r. ontuuni, 
Sole Agent for Pacific Coast, 

Empire Warehouse, Beale St.near M'kt 

SAN FKANOISCO, OAL. 




THE AMERICAN 

TU R B I N I 

Water Wheel. 



Power Pledged Equal 1 

any Over-shot "Wheel 

Ever Built. 

Recently improved and submitted to thorough scie 
tific tests by James Emerson, showing the follow!] 
useful effect of the power bf the water utilized, being 

THE HIGHEST RESULTS EVER KNOWN. 

Percentage of part gate, H 50.08; H 69.64; H 78.1 
% 82.53; % 82.90. Percentage of whole gate, 83.M,> 
Mr. Emerson says: " These are the beat ave 

age results ever given, by any Turbine Whe< 

in my experience." 
A splendidly illustrated descriptive catalogue, or a: I 

further information desired, furniBhedon application 

TREADWELL & CO., 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. ' 
Sole Agents for the Pacific StateB and Territories. I \ 
18v29-eow-tf 




Sturtevant Blowers and Exhaust Fan: 

AT TEE 

PACIFIC MACHINERY DEPO 

H. P. GE.BSOR-S, 

Beale Street, near Market, San Francisco, 



J 




An Illustrated Journal of 



»Y I>I£W1£Y A CO. 
i*u I «> nt Solicitors. 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY. JANUARY 16, 1875. 



VOLUME XX-X 

Number 3. 



Hydraulic Mining in California. 

Wv 8. 

Connections With old Workings. 

The foregoing remarks about the opening of 
Hydraulic mines refer chiefly to those mines or 
gravel deposits which, having never worked 
before, offer all the difficulties of new and un- 
drained ground. . Whenever other mines have 
been worked in the same deep gravel deposits, 
and a neighboring claim has reached its boun- 
daries, thus setting free one side of the gravel 
bank, which shall be submitted to the hydrau- 
lic process, the tunnel can be connected with 
the free Bide by large drifts, constructed on a 
grade sufficient to receive sluice boxes. These 
drifts must be placed deep enough in the bed 
rock to permit the washing of the gravel into 
the sluice boxes from all sides. 

It must be borne iu mind that, under the con- 
ditions mentioned, the very gravel bank 
through which these drifts or cuts run will 
have to be washed away, and the closing up by 
oavings of the mouth of one or the other drift 
can hardly be avoided. 

The best way to clear a mass of caved matter 
from the mouth of a drift is to wash a small 
channel close to the gravel bank, so that the 
caved matter itself forms a wall and barrier on 
the outside, confining thus the water and gravel 
work to a small stream. In this way an open- 
ing is boon made, and the bulk of the caved 
matter can be dispatched through the drift 
whose mouth was cleared. 

The Working of Hydraulic Mines. 

ThiB is done by the power of water and pow- 
der. The power of the former depends on its 
quantity, and the pressure under which it can 
be applied. It is therefore most desirable to 
have the supplying ditch, or reservoir, not only 
at a high elevation above the mine, but also in 
its close proximity. The first condition in- 
sures a great hydrostatic pressure; the second 
a short line of feeding or conveying pipes. 

To give an idea of what a powerful agent 
water can be made under pressure, it may be 
stated that a quantity of water, equal to a 
thousand inches, miners' measure, and yield- 
ing 1,579 cubic feet per minute, can be dis- 
charged under a pressure of from 275 to 300 
feet, through a 6-inch nozzle, with a velocity 
of 140 feet per second, and in a quantity of 
1,645 pounds, for the same length of time. 
Such a quantity of water uninterruptedly 
Btriking the bank, with one-tenth the velocity 
of a cannon ball, must necessarily do great ex- 
ecution, and suffices, in many instances, to 
produce the caving of the gravel bank, without 
resorting to bank blasting. 

After a hydraulic mine has been opened for 
washing operations, a long line of sluice boxes, 
with under-currents, grizzlies, etc., laid down, 
and water under a high pressure connected 
through an iron pipe with one of the improved 
hydraulic nozzles, the real mining work can be 
commenced. The description of the different 
mechanical appliances will be given further on. 
At present the operation itself will be de- 
scribed. 

A single hydraulic nozzle, connected by an 
Iron pipe of any length, with a distributer— 
which latter is again connected with the feed- 
ing pipe, receiving the water from the bulk- 
head of a ditch or reservoir — has been placed 
at a safe distance from the gravel bank to be 
washed. A screw, attached to the distributer 
(for the purpose of opening or shutting a gate 
commanding the connection and flow of water 
between the distributer and the hydraulic noz- 
zle,) is turned, and a stream of water issues 
from the hydraulic nozzle. This stream in- 
creases in Bize and strength as the gate opens 
more and more, and after • a few minutes a 
body from five to seven inches in diameter, 
and representing from 500 to 1,000 inches, 
plays with magnificent force againet the oppo- 
site bank of gravel. The water issuing from 
the nozzle is to the touch as hard as a bar of 
steel, and retains, when thrown from a good 
nozzle, its cylindrical and condensed shape, 
till it strikes the gravel bank. The effect of 
this lance- thrust of water against the bank is 
soon visible. At the first shock, a thousand 
rays of water fly in all directions; a little later, 
the lance has buried itself deep in the bosom 



of the bank, and the water boils and hisses 
over the lips of the aperture, carrying with it 
gravel, saiid, clay, and whatever matter may be 
at hand. The opening widens; flakes of gravel 
tumble in all directions; an arch, wide and 
deep, is made in the gravel bank. The "jambs" 
of the arch to the right and left are demolished 
by turning the jet of water upon them, and the 
first "cave" in the hydraulic mine takes place. 

Condensed from an article by Charles Waldeyer, of 
the Inst Annual Report of the (..'. S. Coram ibsi oner of 
Mining Statistics. 

The Ladies' Friend. . 

We give herewith an illustration of a very 
useful device for dressmakers and those who 
have much cutting to do, it being really a lap 




Improved Lap Board. 

board upon l^gs which are so arranged tha* 
when not in use they can be folded up and 
fastened to the under side of the table so as 
not to be in the way. The cut shows the 
board opened out in readiness for working. 
The two pairs of legs, c, c, are hinged to the 
ends of the table, and have suitable bracinS 
cross bars to keep them steady. At the back 
of the table the two cros3 bars, d, are hioged 
so that when opened their lower ends pass 



An Improved Harrow. 

Frank Donohue, of May field, Santa Clara 
county, has recently patented through the 
Scientific Pbess Patent Agency an improved 
harrow, which we illustrate on this page. It 
is so constructed that by its natural hanging and 
draft, without extra weights, the outer edges 
will keep down to their work and preserve as 
nearly as possible a uniform level and pene- 
tration of the teeth. It is usual to employ a 
weight on each wing of a sectional harrow to 
keep the edges from buckling upward, but by 
the improvement of Mr. Donohue the harrow 
is so constructed that the edges will keep down 
without a weight 

Two hinged sections of a double harrow are 
made, each being rhomboidal in shape and con- 
sisting of as many parallel timbers as desired 
to hold the teeth. These timbers are united 
together by a transverse timber near each end. 
Atone end of each section a partial parallel 
timber is secured, so that when two rhomboid- 
al sections are placed together iu the usual 




Donohue's Improved Harrow. 

way of uniting the two sections of a harrow, 
the two partial timbers of the two sections will 
stand in the same line, and will, in effect, be a 
divided timber in the middle of the harrow. 
The hinge straps or plates are secured upon 
the parallel timbers so that the hinges at the 
opposite ends of the harrow will come on op- 
posite sides of the divided timbers. If a line 
should be drawn through the two hinges it 
would cut the harrow into two trapezoidal 
figures, thus causing the weight of the cor- 
ners to be nearly at right angles to the breaking 
line or joints of the two hinges, so that their 
superior leverage, owing to their greater dis- 




Diagram taken from Engine at the New Mint. 



through mortice slots in the legs, c, and are se- 
cured by a simple button, a, which fits into a 
notch cut in the brace. By this construction 
the whole table is rendered very steady and 
when it is desired to put the table away it is 
only necessary to fold the braces, d, down and 
the legs, c, c, across each other beneath the 
table where the whole can be held by means of 
a button shown upon the braces, d. In weight 
these tables do not exceed that of an ordinary 
lap board, and those who have tired themselves 
with holding one of the old kind, or who have 
seen the inconvenience of putting them down 
with all the work when they have to get up for 
anything, will recognize their value and the 
reason for calling them "The Ladies' Friend." 
A patent has been obtained upon this inven- 
tion through the Mining and Scientific Pbess 
Patent Agency by Mr. Benjamin Strawbridge, 
of Stockton, Cal., where he can be addressed 
for town, shop, or State rights or for single 
tables. 



The shipments of treasure from British 
Columbia by Wells, Fargo & Co., during the 
year 1874, amounted to $1,382,454.78, being 
more than any other year since 1868, an" 
$404,228.29 more than in 1873. 



tance from the hinges, will cause them to keep 
closely down to the ground when the harrow is 
working. 

The double-tree is attached to the harrow eo 
that its middle will be in a line with the two 
hinges, and in order to accommodate it to the 
harrow, the inventor constructs it iu two parts 
and hinges them together as shown. The 
draft will, therefore, be in a direct line with 
the hinges, and consequently the sections will 
have equal rise and fall, and as the diagonal 
corners are further away from the line of 
draft than any other portion of the harrow, 
they will keep close to the ground. 



Gbound was broken, last week, at the 
yard of the Vallejo Ship-building Association, 
for the foundation of the first building thatr-is 
to be erected, This is a two-story building, 75 
long by 30 wide; the upper story being designed 
for use as a loft, on the floor of which ships are 
to be "laid down." 



The Colusa Quicksilver Mines. 

From a private letter to a gentleman in this 
city with regard to the quicksilver mines in and 
near Colusa county, we make the following ex- 
tracts: The Abbot mine, which is just over 
the county line, according to the statement 
published by the Secretary, has produced siuce 
the first of October 125 flasks of mercury 
They are said to have con*idrrable quantiiie 
of ore in sight, and have flattering prospects. 
On the same side of the hill are several other 
"prospects." One of them called Excelsior, 
owned by Disturnell Brothers has turned out 
some very fine ore, having brought in for re- 
duction considerable that has run from 11 to 15 
per cent. The ExcelBior is an extension of the 
Abbot on the south. Adjoining it on the south 
is another mine called the Jackson, which 
from all accounts is prospecting very well, hav- 
ing 30 or 40 tons of pay ore on the dump. 

On the Colusa county side of the hill is the 
Elgin mine, which is about four miles from the 
present Wilbur Springs. The mine is under 
the management of J. O. Smith. They have 
one retort of about 800 pounds capacity per 24 
houra. Mr. Smith started up the retort on 
the 20th of August, and has produced 52 tanks 
of quicksilver. They have some very fine ore 
in sight, and large quantities of furnace ore. 

The Montezuma claim is owned by Hughes, 
Rood and others, who are having a tunnel run 
under their prospect on the smface. They 
have both gold and cinnabar ore. The Man- 
zanita is one of the oldest claims in the dis- 
trict, and the most of it is owned by C. B. 
Hughes. It produces some very good ore. 

The Buckeye mine, notwithstanding the diffi- 
culties they have had to overcome in law suits, 
lack of means, etc., has produced over 600 
tanks of meroury since starting. The mine is 
looking very well. They cleared up last week, 
after seven days' run about twenty-two flasks 
of mercury, which would be from eighty to 
ninety per month. They expect to exceed this 
when the drain tunnel is completed. It is now 
in ore 500 feet, and the shaft will be reached in 
about 100 feet more. Two more winzes are 
being sunk from the main level, 150 feet apart, 
to the grade of the drain turmel, and they will 
then work in from different directions. So 
that by March or April the Superintendent ex- 
pects to have it right in the heart of the mine 
with a heavy body of ore£overhead which they 
can break down as it suits their convenience. 



d,.W 



The coin dies of the United States mint at 
Carson for the year 1874 were defaced last 
Wednesday, with the usual ceremonies, all the 
officers of the mint being present. 



The New Mint Engine. 

Most conspicuous among the lavish equip- 
ments of the new Mint in this city, in the me- 
chanical department, and claiming the atten- 
tion of the numerous visitors, stands the mas- 
sive high pressure beam engine, built by Booth 
& Company, with its polished engine bed, pil- 
lars, and entablature. We have already des- 
cribed this engine and now present a diagram 
taken from it with a Richards' indicator, one of 
the first taken. The diagram is on a scale of 30 
pounds to the inch. The engine has a four-foot 
stroke, and had a comparatively light load at 
the time the diagram was taken, 9:30 a. m. The 
points to be deduced from the diagram are as 
follows : 

Commencing with the stroke at the top of 
the cylinder we see the steam valve begins to 
shut at one-eighth and closes at one-third of 
the stroke (the points dotted) whence we have 
the expansion curve the remaining portion of 
the stroke and returning get a well proportioned 
lead of steam, shown by the rounded curve. 

Starting from the bottom of the cylinder 
we have steam shut oft" at one-sixteenth, the 
steam expanding and falling in pressure, as 
shown by the expansion curve the remainder of 
the stroke. Returning we notice that the steam 
valve requires a litttle steam for cushioning, 
i. e. helping the piston over the dead point, 
which would give a rounded corner in the 
diagram similar to the top. The load is com- 
paratively light and the pressure small, but it 
would be desirable for top and bottom stroke 
to give the same reading in points of cut-off, 
etc. The valveB are each worked by a separate 
cam, and as this admits of independent and ex- 
act adjustment, doubtless ere this the points 
we have remarked have been carried into prac- 
tical operation by the very competent staff of 
mechanical engineers, 



34 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS 



[January 16, 1875 



: 



CORRESPONDENCE. 



Among the Quicksilver Mines. 



EditobsPeess: — Arrived here last evening 
by saddle from Capay valley, over a tolerably 
good mountain wagon road, the distance being 
from D. C. Ramsey's ranch, the highest up 
Capay valley, about 32 miles. But by trail up 
Cache Creek valley from same ranch, I could 
have reached Knoxville in about eight or nine 
miles, and that, too, over an excellent route 
for a good wagon road. From Knmsey's to 
Woodland, 46 miles of level road down Cache 
creek, thus making the entire distance to rail- 
road at "Woodland 45 miles. To Napa city it is 
53 miles. It seems strange that Yolo county 
should fail to see that this little internal im- 
provement is much needed in her own county, 
and where so small an outlay would be sure to 
return a quick profit. Private enterprise will 
soon take hold of it as a profitable investment, 
if the county does not move in the matter. Af- 
ter a weary day's travel it is truly a treat to 
dismount iu so pleasant a camp, which, by the 
way, would be a fully incorporated city in Ne- 
vada State. 

The whole aspect of the place here, however, 
speaks business, not town lot speculations, 
etc. One large hotel with ample accommoda- 
tions for man and a good stable for , horses. 
After an excellent night's rest, I Ballied forth 
to take a peep into some of the beauties of a 
quicksilver camp. After a cursory view of the 
quiet, but yet busy town, I took a two 
mile walk up the fine graded road to the Man- 
hattan Co.'s mines, under superintendency of 
Joseph Osborn, who being absent, Mr. Charles 
Howard kindly showed the various parts of the 
mine. The mining operations were being car- 
ried on very successfully under *H. Greertman 
and-J. H. Morse, Foremen. By aid of drills, 
powder, cars and long chutes the ores are very 
cheaply transported from their native beds to 
the reduction works, where I found Mr. Jo- 
seph Meyer, superintending the furnace oper- 
ations. Time does not allow me to detail this 
furnace matter further than the simple state- 
ment that they run a Koox & Osborn furnace, 
of 24 tons capacity, and are working 16 to 
to 20 tons daily, employing 65 to 70 men 
in all. Wages, to miners, $45.00; helper, 
§40.00; common laborers, $35.00 per month 
and board, with cabin accommodations. Every 
thing seems to move along in a systematic, 
common sense order, and is done by firs'-class 
white labor. The deepest work in the mine is 
about 200 feet, but now finding plenty of good 
ore at a depth of not over 60 feet from the sur- 
face, where it is well ventilated and healthy 
working. 

But I must pass on over the hills to the Cal- 
ifornia company's works, on the Keid mines, 
3 miles north of Knoxville. TheBe mines, sit- 
-Uittd just aoross the line of Napa into Yolo 
county, are esteemed highly among valuable 
claims. Through the kind attention of the 
Superintendent, T. J. Hall, his Assistant, J. S. 
Lambert.and Stephen Maynard, Foreman of the 
mine, I had abundant opportunity to visit and 
examine the principal points of interest at the 
furnace and mine. The lower tunnel, through 
which as a thoroughfare, all the ore from the 
various tunnels and surface workings for the 
300-foot above it will be discharged, is about 
500 feet long, with a well ironed car track. 
Above this is another tunnel 600 feet loDg, 
with its cross sections and stopings. Above 
this is a still a third tunnel, between 400 and 
500 feet long. And above, and "sky-ward" as 
they term it, are open surface workings, yield- 
ing good mineral, worked to the depth of 40 or 
5J feet. They employ genuine first-class, in- 
telligent labor in evtry part of their operations. 
They are using at present one of the best con- 
structed Knox & Osborn furnaces, with ample 
condensing chambers wiih vapor draught ex- 
tending nearly a quarter of a mile away, up the 
mountain side, thus freeing the whole premi- 
ses of any danger from hurtful gases or mercu- 
ry poison. Capacity of furnace, 24 tons daily. 
I noticed also, one peculiar feature, introduced 
by Mr. Hall with successful results for econo- 
my. The fine metal bearing dirt and gravel he 
concentrates by aid of water, so that he need 
pass but a small amount through the fur- 
nace and gets more satisfactory results. 

The amount of metal yield varies according 
to quality of ore used; last week gave a yield of 
40 tanks of 76% pounds each, but some weeks 
run less. 

They employ on all their workp, including 
extensive wood and farm operations, 100 men. 
The company erect all necessary dwellings and 
own all improvements made on their lands. 

They have plenty of water running through 
their valley into Cache creek and thence down 
Capay valley, paBt Woodland in Yolo county. 
Eight miles of easily graded road would con- 
neot them with the road at the head of Capay 
valley and thus enable them to reach their 
county seat, and also carry their metal over a 
beautiful down grade road to the railroad at 
Woodland. This California company alone 



could soon build the road if allowed to spend 
the road tax collected by Yolo county from 
their hands'on^that road. As now situated, 
they feel that there is some injustice done 
them. 

Napa county pursues a more liberal course 
with the Redington company, at Knoxville, in 
the disposition of road monies, and will be the 
gainer thereby. This Redington Quicksilver 
Mining company being a great representative 
mining operation has been fully written up and 
needs little to be said. Through the obliging 
clerk of the company, Mr. Hall, I obtained the 
following items — not having time to inspect 
the interior of the mine. Mr. C. E. Livermore 
superintends the entire operations. 

They employ 250 men. They have three 
Knox & Osborn furnaces and one more is being 
erected. These are old style furnaces that 
work about 200 tons per week. TheK & O. 
furnaces yielded about 600 to 1,000 flasks per 
month for the past few months. Plenty of 
good ore in the mine on the 400-foot level. 

The company own the entire town and miles 
of surrounding lands, with a vast store of all 
ihe ordinary and extraordinary necessities; 
provisions, clothes, medicines, etc.; hotel and 
stable, shops, and even the church edifiee, a 
very creditable emblem of civilization. Perhaps 
it is one vast monopoly! Who knows? If so, 
this fact failed to appear in any form of com- 
plaint from their tenants and operatives. I had 
a long talk with one who has been 8 years in 
their employ, and occupying a very responsible 
position. I heard no words of dissatisfaction. 
This same feature is common to all the three 
companies. Each having an entire ownership 
of extensive domain and supplying the princi- 
pal wants of their operatives. They even em- 
ploy a first-class physicians at a trifling ex- 
pense to each. Dr. Sweet, now employed by 
all three companies, seems very popular with 
all ;but very little sickness iu the camp. C. 
Knoxville, Dec. 25. 



The Sumner Mine. 

The Sumner mine, in Kernville, Kerncoun 
ty, is an old mine which has been worked for 
several years without profit, but which will 
shortly be heard from, and is likely to 
rank with the most famous mines on the 
coast. It might have liugered along, occasion- 
ally worked and oftener idle, had not the atten- 
tion of Senator Jones been attracted to it about 
Ihree years ago. It now belongs to the Sena- 
tor and E. It. Banke. Since that time it has 
yielded $8,000 to $10,000 a month from s< 
much ore as could be crushed by an old rattle 
trap 15-stamp mill. Most of the time since 
then has been spent in perfecting the title 
which was very much involved. The difficul- 
ties have all been removed, and United States 
patents obtained. The Sumner mine now in 
eludes the old Sumner and the Big Blue 
mines. The claim is 8,000 feet leng, with a 
vein 60 to 80 feet wide, of which 15 to 40 feet 
is pay ore. The character of the rock is free 
milling. A new water power mill of 80 stamps 
is just being completed. Hoisting works of 
the most approved Cormstock pattern, and lar- 
ger than anything yet erected in California, 
are building, and will be finished in April, 
when the new mill will be set to work on $35 
rock, of which the mill will crush 160 tons a day. 
As the Kern river runs past the mine, and the 
productiveness of the" mine with the new hoist- 
ing works cannot be estimated until it reaches 
the quantity necessary to 'feed 1,000 stamps. 
With such facilities a mine of this extent must 
contribute largely to the enrichment of its 
owners and the filling up of Kern county with 
inhabitants of every occupation. Senator 
Jones' investment in the mine alone is said to 
be $500,000. 



All Alive to ihe Nokthwakd. — L. H. Torp, 
keeper of the Gelger Grade toll-house, informs 
us that there, was a straggling army of men on the 
move along his road to the northward last 
night, all excited about their mining claims in 
that direction. The time for doing the requ red 
$100 worth of work expired at 12 m. last night, 
and the owne.s of claims felt that it was time 
for them to be up and doing. A great many 
parties of jumpers were out. Some whose 
claims are doubtless all right were out to guard 
against these and warn them away, while oth- 
ers who are probably not at all right went out 
in order that they might be found on their 
claims and at work when the hour of twelve 
should strike. Tha jumpers were very numer- 
ous, and it was feared that there would be 
bloodshed during the night. It is said that no 
less than four different parties went out north 
to jump a certain claim which all have been 
long watching. Those who first succeeded in 
posting their notice when the witching hour of 
midnight arrived would be the lucky ones. The 
parties leaving town went provided with pro- 
visions and otherwise fully equipped. Such 
was the demand for teams and riding animals 
that the stock of all of ihe livery stables was 
exhausted. — Virginia Enterprise. 



The Sheep Ranch Mine. 

A correspondent of the Call writing from 
Sheep Ranch mine says : Our camp being 
only eleven miles from the "big trees," tourists 
could make the call with scarcely any extra 
expense of time or money. Here is the well 
known Sheep Ranch mine, owned by Messrs, 
Ferguson, Wallace and Early,, without paying 
the best, for the money invested, of all the 
mines in the State. Their mill is running 
continually. They have just finished new 
hoisting works at the old shaft near the east 
end of the claim, and are now retimbering it 
Walter and I had a little game the other day. 
Taking a tub of water to the dump we tried to 
see which could find gold first. He rather 
b^at me, but I believe we did not pick up a 
piece of rock that did not show gold. Some of 
the ribbon rock was besprinkled with it. Now 
and then a little galena was seen, but this mine 
has but few sulpburets. 

Adjoining, and on the same lead to the east, 
is the McNair claim. This has been prospected 
sufficiently to warrant the belief that it is a 
first-class mine. A shaft about one hundred 
feet in depth has been sunk, and considerable 
drifting and stoping done, the rock paying 
well. This mine has not been worked for sev- 
eral years, but a new shaft is about to be sunk 
near the west end, where, in the claim adjoin- 
ing, excellent ore was taken out. There the 
water will not bother, as the contiguous mine 
has been worked up to the line. There is 
probably no better place for the investment of 
capital than right here, and I understand the 
claim is offered for sale, as the owner wishes 
to. remove. Here on these mines were cor- 
ralled for years a band of sheep, the shepherds 
daily stumbling over rich croppings, as un- 
suspecting of the wealth below as the woolly 
quadruped they tended. 

A little to the south is a new claim owned by 
Messrs. Bean, Smith & Hicks. They have 
only crushed nineteen tons of ruck, which paid 
$61 to the ton. This mine was discovered by 
Mr. Bean, an old prospector, and one of the 
best on the mineral belt. A little further to 
the south is the Lodi. It bas paid well, but 
has not been worked for the past two years. 
Messrs. Hull & Tichner, the present owners, 
are now preparing to resume work. 

A li tie to the east is anew mine discovered 
by Joseph Mason; he is busily engaged in get- 
ting out good-looking rock. .Near this mine is 
one owned by Messrs Toon & Hull, which has 
not been prospected much on account of water. 
So all are at work. 

Coal Slate.— Jeremiah Gibson has shown 
us a specimen of coal slate, taken from a dis- 
covery he has made but a short distance from 
this city. The substance is sufficiently carbon- 
iferous to burn with considerable coaxing, 
which the discoverer thinks is a splendid indi- 
cation that genuine coal will be found on dig- 
ging sufficiently far into the ground. It is to 
be hoped that these surmises will prove cor- 
rect, and we shall be pleased to record the fact 
as soon as made clearly evident. So many in- 
ducible evidences of the near presence of the 
genuine article have been found hereabout 
aud snbBeqneutly dwindled to a fine point and 
fiually to nothingness that faith in gemviue in- 
dications short of the real article itself has be- 
come somewhat shaken. It is to be hoped 
Mr. Gibson will persevere in his prospecting 
labors in this locality and finally bring an un- 
doubted specimen of coal. Such a discovery 
would be invaluable to this city. The gentle- 
man named has already made several discov- 
eries ol material of a useful character. — Beserst 
( Utah) N ews. 

Wabd and Julia. — The Gold Hill News says 
that an agreement was entered into on the 23d 
ult. between the Julia Gold and Silver Mining 
company and the Ward Mining company, 
wuose mine adjoins that of the former com- 
pany, by which, for the space of eighteen 
months, "the Ward Mining company have the 
privilege of working their mine through any of 
the levels of the Julia mine to the north line of 
the Wawi claim, with the use of the tracks, 
shaft and hoisting apparatus of the Julia com- 
pany. 

The New Standard. — A meter is three feet, 
three inches and three-eighths. Consequents, 
five centimeters are nearly two inches. The 
nickel half-dime is two centimeter-; in diameter, 
aud weighs five grammes. Eight kilometers 
are nearly five miles. Sixty-six kilometers are 
about forty-one miles. Twenty-five millimeters 
make almost an inch. All this is to become 
familiar after the Centennial. 



New Locations. 

The Virginia Chronicle says: A large number 
of locations of mining ground have been made 
since the law of Congress took effect on the 
first of January. On the hills surrounding townj 
notices are met with everywhere, some of which! 
are in out of the way localities, which had been 
abandoned years ago, and where there is no 
more probability of finding a paying mine than 
out in the Twenty-six- mile desert. Perhaps,* 
however, the object of the projectors is to form 
companies, issue stock and dispose of it fo«j 
whatever can be realized, as was common iu 
Washoe in early days. Some of the locations 
have been made in the most ridiculous manner, 
and without any regard to the points of tha 
compass. Some run directly east and west, 
and one at least extends 1500 feet directly 
across the Comstock ledge. What thiB mining 
sharp expects to accomplish is not easy to 
conjecture. Other property which has been) 
taken up is really valuable. In some cases* 
good claims had been abandoned yeara 
ago by the owners, who had followed other ex^ 
citements and gone off to new countries, while 
in other instances companies had been working 
on properties to which they had no title, ana 
took no pains to secure one, when the time ar- 
rived. A number of persons are still travefi 
sing the hills north and south of the ends oj 
the Comstock, looking for eligible locations, 
The weather has been as propitious as if seji 
apart especially to favor prospecting at thp 
right time. Had the ground been covered 
with snow a foot or two in depth for the las) 
week, nothing could have been done, but th| 
mild temperature and balmy atmosphere seel 
to draw persons out into the hills for amuB< 
ment as in the early days of spring. 



[1 



Sing 



i. 



Good for the " C and C. — There are thosj 
among bur mining men who predict that the ne* 
C and C shaft now being sunk near the works o] 
the Virginia City Gas company, will strike orj 
before attaining a depth of 600 feet. Thb 
would be a big thing and a fine send off for tbi 
C. and C. We all know that General Thomat 
H. Williams found fine prospects three or fottt 
hundred yards further east in boring' dowi 
from 600 to 800 feet with a diamond drill. TI 
progress of the C and C shaft will be watch 
with the keenest interest by all our mini] 
men, as all have looked upon the Burface co) 
figuration of the ground thereabout with 
wistful eye. In the whole basin extendi: 
across the eastern front of all of thebonanzi. 
claims nothing that could be called a shaft hn 
ever been sunk — nothing but the old-fashion* 
circular prospect holes. — Enterprise, 

FOUNDRYMEN EXEMPT FEOM LICENSE. — A 

agreed case was recently made in this city x< :: 
test the power of the City License Collector ttkii 
demand license tax from foundrymen Mr :■ . 
Palmer of the Miners' foundiy was arrestee pose 
for refusing to pay license and the case went ti{ fat 
trial. The defense set up in this case was thai ita 
the defendant and his partners only manuiac > 
tured articles in their line of business to ordeal 
» Lid did not keep any merchandise on hana 
and for sale. The court held that this was no 
a vendor within the meaning of the law, an 
therefore dismissed the complaint. 

Panamint is supplied by water from sprin. 
located in the canon above town, brought don 
in pipes and retailed at present at five cent 
per gallon. The supply is and will be ampt 
for quite a city, and may be increased indefi 
nitely by wells of about 100 ft in depth, two c Jj 
which' are now in use. About a sluice head c ^ 
the finest water bursts out two miles down ih>\ ^ 
canon and continues to the sands three mile ^ 
below, and along the only road by which team W 
can reach the town. ^ 

Theee are on exhibition at the office of Salt n > 

ulve) <* 
at abot *:' 

a lHn ■ 

I 



weighing 216 pounds, and valued 
§4,000, smelted at the Sacramento 6meltia?^ 
works, from ore which had been looked upo * 
as very difficult to reduce, but the new supe l 



simple process of his own. 



Cheeky. — Two well-known mining Superin- 
tendents of this city were yesterday discussing 
the bonanza, when one of them propounded 
the following question to his brother silver- 
hunter: "Supposing the Almighty to have 
given you full power and authority to make 
such a body of ore as you pleased, could you 
have made a better one?" "I don't know," 
said the other; "but I Bbould have made it still 
bigger." "Well," said the first Bpeaker, "you 
have more cheek than any man I ever saw — you 
have, by thunder!" — Enterprise. 



Mining Decision. — Tne Secretary of the In- 
terior has affirmed the decision of the General 
Land Office in the case of the Kempton mine, 
Utah. The question involved was the citizen- 
ship of the original locator and intermediate 
owners. The Secretary decides that applicants 
for patents must furnish proof of their own 
citizenship only. 

A nugget weighing 68 ounces was last week 
taken out of the Bald Mountain, Sierra county. 
The company have again washed up the dirt in 
the small dump at the mouth of the tunnel, 
and the result was a dividend of §1,000 to the 
share, $20, 000 in all. 

James Mabeon, a miner working in the Chal- 
cedony mines, near Gibsonville, was last week 
found dead in a tunnel, having been suffocated 
with smoke from the engine room. 

The town of Panamint stands directly in the 
midst of the mines. 



■ill, 

. Hi 

The Tribune, in its annual review of th 4 
mines, says that Utah produced in 1874 near- 
$8,000,000 in silver bullion. This is near! f[iir 
double the product of last year, and place ^ 
Ui ah next to California in the production < „ ff 
the precious metals. |U 

There are some of the richest gravel min 
in the State near Central hill, Calaveras coa - 
ty. A clean-up of the Haskins claim, aft 1 ;£ T 
washing the gravel obtained by two weel '*> 
drifting, yielded 180 ounces of the precio : K 
metal. ; ^ 

Oee Shipped. — Captain Richards sbippi 4I | 
yesterday four car loads of copper ore fro n j 
Battle mountain to San Francisco. The ore ^ 
from the English company's mine at Copr, 
canyon, and will be shipped from San Franc; *h 
co to Liverpool. — Silver State. 

The old Green mine, on Gold canyon, >M 
short distance below the Justice, after a rest h$ 
a couple of years, is now being reopened witl Vhj 
view to its thorough practical developme) H 
under the superintendence of W. W. Turnc 
who is also superintendent of the Pictou. 

Last week, says the Lake County Bee, W <,, 
WilliamB discovered a ledge of silver be ari £! 
rock in the vicinity of the Highland Spr>nt 
On last Tuesday a ledge, supposed to be of ( t 
same character, was discovered in Scott'sT ^" 
ley. 



January 16, 1875. j 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



35 



ECHANICAL 



Progress, 

_# 



Improvements in Glass Manufacture. 

Considerable attention appears to be given at 
the present time in relation to improvement* 
in the manufacture of glass, with a view to its 
more general utilization. The latest aimmiuce- 
ment we have noticed in this direction is the 
following: A French chemist professes to have 
discovered the secret of a chemical composi- 
tion which has the property of giviving to glass 
extraordinary hardness. Immersed in a bath 
of the new inveution the ordinary material ac- 
quired such a degree of cohesion that it opposes 
to shock of hard bodies or action of lire a resis- 
tance ten or fifteen times greater than before. 
The utilit\ of the discovery is evident, as, if 
employed windows will not be broken by hail, 
[a up glassses will not be cracked by the flames; 
in l may even fall from a bight of several yards 
without danger. The material being no longer 
fragile may be employed for many uses for 
which it is not at present fitted. 

A French journal of a late date alludvs to 
Lhe above invention as follows: "The iuven- 
;ion is termed 'steeped glass;' that is, a glass 
which has acquired its peculiarity by liqid ab- 
wrption— by being 'steeped' in some liquid. 
V number of experiment* were made with 
he 'steeped glass" at Buurg, where a cotn- 
.»iiiy had been organized to introduce the arti- 
ile iuto commerce. A sample of only three 
ilimeters in thickness resisted the weight of 
.00 grammes falling from the height of rive 
neters. Thrown on the ground with force it 
rebounded without breaking, and emitted a 
ton nd like a leaf of metal; and, in flue, it was 
'ound to be incombustible to any definite h< at. 
Che company will first introduce it in kitchen 
xticles. This seems to be the re-discovery of 
tne of the loBt arts of the ancients, which was 
ell known to the artificers of the Ptolemies, 
nd even as late as the time of Archimedes. It 
iromises to make a revolation in the material of 
learly every article of domestic utility. 
[We have taken measures to learn more defi- 
ritely with regard to the truth or falsity of this 
sserted invention, and shall communicate to 
ur readers whatever information we may ob- 
aiu as soon as received. — Ed3. Press.] 



•ingle Rail Steam Towage on the 
Belgian Canal. 

We learn from the Moniteur Industriel Beige 
nat a system of steam towage is about to be 
atablished on the Bourgogne canal, over a 
istance of about 150 miles. The tow path will 
e laid with a single rail weighing some 16 
oands to the yard, and fixed on traverses 
laced 3*2 feet apart. The locomotive has four 
rheels, two of which are placed directly along 
e axis of the vehicle, one in advance of the 
ther, and two, on-! at either side. The former 
air are directing, the latter driving, wheels, 
'he directing wheels are grooved, and fit the 
>il; the others have rubber ties which give 
OTchase on the macadamized road, and which 
ress thereon only to the extent of - 07 pounds 
er square inch. By means of simple mechan- 
m, the weight of the machine may be thrown 
ther upon the driving or directing wheels at 
ill . In the first case the maximum and in the 
.st the minimum of adherence is obtained, to 
lit the conditions of a loaded or an empty 
oat. A single road is to be used, with relay 
igines provided at suitable distances. Each 
icomotive tows one boat; and when a meeting 
ikes place of two traveling in opposite direc- 
ons, the engines change boats and retrace 
teir paths. 

This single rail system has already been 
itisfactorily tested for short distanc.es on the 
elgian canals, and the^projector, M. Larman- 
has obtained a government concession for 
s extended construction for 40 years. The 
comotives are to weigh four tons each, and 
ill travel at the rate of 3*1 miles per hour, 
ith full boats carrying a cargo of 150 tons 

*-• . 

India-KubrerTibes.— Messrs. Bird & Co., 
London, have lately brought into notice a 
and improved wheel, with India-rubber 
re, which is claimed to be capable of wearing 
i long as, or longer than an iron tire, and to 
we the great advantage of perfect noiseless- 
388 and absence of injurious jar. The draft 
the carriage is Baid to be reduced by the use 
this tire nearly one-third. It appears to be 
mply a tire of solid rubber, fastened on the 

Ifr ;terior of an ordinary wheel by bolts, such as 
'e used with iron tires, and it may be thinner 

jp] an the usual kind, merely serving the pur- 
>8e of a band to hold the wood work firmly 
gether. 



A han&ing railway car, suggested by Mr. Bes- 
mer's steam system, has been tested with 
iccess on the northern railway of France, 
sated in this car, which hangs on elastic 
fe irings, the traveler experiences the sensation 
*J a hammook, free from vibrations and bump- 
|E g. The movement is described as very gentle. 

nI_povED Stucco. — M. Landrin, recommends 
e mixing of the crude plaster in water con- 
i ining 8 or 10 per cent, of sulphuric acid, 
fter allowing the compound to rest for fifteen 
mutes, he calcines the plaster. This gives 
stucco of excellent quality in which all 
•ganic matters are burnt out leaving the 
aterial of exceptional whiteness. 



Relative Cost of Water and Steam 
Powers. 

The cost of the water power equipuiuut at 
Lowell was, for canals and dams, $100; for 
wheels, etc, another $100, per horse power. 

But this, an a first experiment, was more costly 
than a similar equipment need be. At Saeo 
the expense incurred was $175 per horse power; 
but at a later period, for turbines with high 
heads, the expense would be less. A con- 
struction and equipment, solidly carried out, 
with the latest improvement in wheels, would 
not cost over $200 for horse power, and would, 
nnder favorable circumstances, cost less. An 
estimate at Penobscot was for $112.50 per 
horse power. If the construction be with 
wooden dams, and the equipment with lower 
grade wheels, then the cost would be about $50 
per horse power; and although the construc- 
tion would be less permanent than the more 
solid, it would outlast any steam apparatus. 
On the other hand, Fall River estimates of 
steam equipment, exclusive of foundations and 
engine houses, run from $100 to $115 per 
horse power. A Boston authority gives $115 
per horse power for nominal 300 horse power 
and upwards, inclusive of foundations and 
masonry. Similarly a Portland authority 
places it at $100 per horse power. The actual 
cost of steam equipment in the water works 
of various cities of the United States varies 
from $150 to $300 per horse power. 

As to the cost of work done, it appears that 
in Philadelphia in 1807 the cost of raising water 
by water power was only 2% cents per 1,000,000 
gallon feet; whereas the cost by ateani power 
was in four cities 8 3-10, 11 1-10, and 10 1-10 
cents, with coal at $5.50 per ton. 




A New Wonder in Steam. 

A correspondent of the American Manufac- 
turer writes from the vicinity of Pittsburg, Pa., 
as follows: 

A conundrum for steam engineers to solve: 
Two gentlemen who engaged in engine building 
on the North Side, one of whom is largely in- 
terested in BuLler county and Alleghany oil 
regions, made a special trip this week to the 
Steel (originally the McClintock) farm, 'to in- 
vestigate a new system of using and utiliziug 
steam power. The owner first had a 40 -horse- 
power locomotive boiler, and had attached, 
separately, with the boiler two engines with 
12x8 inch cylinders, to pump wells, making 
each 56 revolutions per minute. He afterwards 
attached a third engine to work from the escape 
steam from one of the first engines, which 
made 65 revolutions. He then detached one 
of the first engines from the boiler and worked 
it by the escape steam from the second, being 
successful in running three cylinders of same 
size. He then branched off the escape pipe 
from the third engine, and is now running two 
of the same power by the escape steam, after 
doing duty in three next the boiler, all being 
same size, and two last escaping in the open 
air, the boiler only consuming one-half the 
fuel as when all connected separately. My in- 
formant being fully satisfied of the facts as 
stated, left orders with his manager to experi- 
ment on the farm of his company, having quite 
a number of wells now pumping by separate 
engines. Now who will be able to accouut for 
this new increased power from one-half the fuel 
consumed, if by adding en gi nes indefinitely and 
gaining power by each additional attachment, 
we have room y et to learn something about 
steam power. 



A New Paper Boaed. — A new method of 
manufacturing paper board, to make that arti- 
cle more generally useful and durable, is de- 
scribed as follows: "When a sheet of paper is 
immersed in an animonieal solution of copper, 
and then dried, it is said to be quite impregna- 
ble to water, and does not lose this quality even 
though the water be boiling. Two sheets of 
paper thus prepare*, and passed through a 
cylinder, adhere to each other so completely as 
to be quite inseparable. If a large number of 
sheets so prepared be cylindered together, boards 
of great thickness are obtained, the resistance 
and cohesion of which may be increased by 
interposing fibrous matters or clothes. The 
substance so prepared is quite as hard as the 
closest grained wood of the same thickness. 
The ammonical solution of copper is prepared 
by treating plates of copper with ammonia of 
the density of 0,880 in contact with the atmos- 
phere. 

Immense Photographs. — Photographs have 
been made of the new Opera House, Paris, four 
feet three inches in length, and three feet four 
inches in night. They were obtained in one 
Bingle piece, by well known processes, and with 
the aid of a large and specially constructed 
camera. All the lines of the pictures are of 
remarkable excellence, the moldings, the busts, 
the medallions, and even the minutest details 
being reproduced with rare perfection. The 
attempt is being made to secure pictures even 
larger than this: 



Paper Manufacture. — Upwards of one hun- 
dred firms are engaged in the manufacture and 
sale of paper in Philadelphia, the first estab- 
lished in the country being the Bittenhouse 
Mills, where the old Continental paper money 
was made. At the-present time all our bank 
note and fractional currency paper is made by 
the old and wealthy firm of J. M. Wilcox & 
Co., of that city. 



A New Bleaching Material— The essence 
of terebinthiua has recently been found to pos- 
sess extraordinary bleaching properties. Nearly 
every kind of organic matter subjected to its 
action becomes lapidly blanched. The discov- 
ery was accidentally made in the Jardiu dee 
Plants, while soaking tho skeletons of birds in 
the essence of terebinthiua, for tho purpose of 
cleansing them of the lleshy matter adhering 
to the bones. 

[The "essence" above referred to we pre- 
sume is obtained from the terebinth tree— P. 
Ibrebinthus— of the genus Pistachio, form which 
resinous substance known as Ck'tan turpentine 
is obtained. This tree flourishes in the island 
of Chio. One of tho vurieties of the tree pro- 
duces the Pistachio nut, the kernels of which 
are of a green calor, and of a very agreeeable 
flavor. The discovery may prove of some con- 
siderable importance. — Eds. Press.] 

Phenomenon in Iron Drawing. — In drawing 
certain numbers of iron wire, it often becomts 
necessary, in order to continue the use of the 
drawing bench, to anneal the iron. This is 
done in a hermetically closed receptacle, so as 
to avoid, as much as possible, the oxidation of 
the metal. In spite of this precaution, how- 
ever, the latter becomes covered with an 
ochraceousfilm, which it is necessary to remove 
by an acidulated bath. It frequently happens, 
however, tba't, subsequent to this process, the 
metal becomes so brittle as to render its further 
drawing impossible. M. Seroz, engineer of the 
Societe des Forges de La Frenche Compte, has 
examined into this phenomenon, and finds that 
the iron becomes charged with a condensed 
gas. On breaking the wire under water in a 
test tube, inflammable bubbles were generated, 
which detonated in the air. The exact nature 
of the gas has not yet been decided, nor that 
of its direct action upon the metal; but it is be- 
lieved to be either hydrogen or carbonic oxide. 



Scientific Discoveries in Cyprus.— It is re- 
ported that Dr. Dethier, director of the muse- 
um at Constantinople, has, in conjunction with 
the American Consul General, Signor Cesnola, 
secured an interesting collection of antiquarial 
objects in the island of Cyprus. The mass of 
treasures accumulated by these indefatigable 
explorers was so great that more than a fort- 
night had been absorbed in packing the forty*- 
four crates and thirty chests required for their 
reception. The discoveries of M. M. Dethier, 
ar.d Cesnola include several cylindrical grave- 
stones bearing Greek inscriptions, which may 
probably be referred to the early Christian ages 
and the closing period of paganism; but here, 
as in numerous other remains of the same 
kiud, there is no trace of a cross or any analo' 
gous religious symbol. 



Improved Chromo-Lithographic Process. — 
Messrs. Johnson, of Hatton Garden, London, 
have invented a new and very economical pro- 
cess for producing chronio-Ii Allographs. In 
place of using a special stone for each color, 
necessitating as many separate impressions as 
there axe colors, the entire subject is drawn 
upon a single stone and a proof is taken on a 
thin sheet of copper. This sheet is theu cut 
out carefully according to the desired contour 
of the colors, and upon each of the portions is 
fixed a solid block of color previously .prepared. 
The whole is combined into one form, and is 
printed on an ordinary press — all the colors at 
once. 

Electro-Magnets for Blasting. — An officer 
in the French army has communicated to the 
Paris Academy of Sciences the results of ex 
periments during the siege of that city, which, 
he believes, may prove important for firing 
military and other mines. It is found that, 
when two bars of soft iron, armed with thin 
coils, are placed side by side, and one is mag- 
netized, the other becomes also magnetized by 
induction, and the charge of the second is 
nearly twice as strong as that of the other. 
Hence the idea originated of employing aux- 
iliary bars to increase the power of the coil 
used for such purposes. 



Electricity and Muscular Action. — Scien- 
tists and the afflicted will await with interest 
the result of a trial of electricity in support of 
a pedestrian in a prolonged feat. In connec- 
tion with a challenge to a rival he announces 
his purpose to rely largely for physical support 
upon the electrical bath as administered in 
all the large cities. The test will doubtles at- 
tract great attention and perhaps develop facts 
but little understood by the general public. 

Sunspot and Ozone. — It would appear from 
the records of Mr. T. Moffat for nineteen years, 
1851-1869, that the maximum of sunspot gives 
a maximum of ozone, and that the minimum 
of sunspot gives the minimum of ozone. The 
years 1854 and 1863 appear to be exceptional. 
In 1854, however, ozone observation at Haw- 
arden were suspended for three months; which 
may account for the irregularity in that year. 



Professor Marsh and party returned to 
New Haven from the "West on Saturday, Dec. 
12. The soientifio results of the expedition 
are important, and will soon be published. 



The Great Telescope. 

The magnificent donation of Mr. Lick, of 
this city, for the construction of a telescope 
which shall ombody all that science and me- 
chanics, at the present day, can do to reveal to 
us more of the wonders of the starry universe, 
has excited much attention all over the world. 
Already a competent scieutist has been com- 
missioned to visit the leading observatories of 
Europe and learn all that can be of advantage 
to the commission designated by Mr. Lick for 
carrying out his praiseworthy purpose. 

Previous to Mr. Lick's purpose in this direc- 
tion being made known, measures had been 
taken in France to construct a telescope of 
mammoth dimensions. This was first pro- 
jected by M. Foucault, in 1865, but was laid 
aside in c.onsequence of the death of its pro- 
jector. It has since, however, been resumed 
under the direction of a well known astrono- 
mer, Mr. Wolf, and the construction of the in- 
struuient is being pushed forward as rapidly as 
possible. The tube of this gigantic instru- 
ment is nearly 50 feet long, and 6 feet 8 inches 
in diameter, while thatof Hersehell's is only five 
feet. The reflector is to be produced at the 
Saint Gobin glassworks, and the production of 
the mould alone, which is already completed, 
occupied six months. The mirror will be pro- 
duced spherical, and will afterwards he worked 
up nearly to a parabolic form; finally it is to be 
covered with silver or gold. It is said that the 
staircase and stages to be used with this giant 
telescope will present fine specimens of me- 
chanical ingenuity. The power of this instru- 
ment will greatly exceed any telescope hitherto 
constructed. 

The experience gained in the construction 
of this will doubtlebS afford many useful hints 
in the construction of the San Francisco in- 
strument, which will probably not be com- 
menced until the former is completed. The 
Lick telescope will greatly exceed the power of 
the French instrument, and will no doubt fur- 
nish some most important revelations in as- 
tronomical science. 



New Discoveries in the Mammoth Cave. — 
Professor F. W. Putnam, of thePeabody Aoad- 
emy of Sciences, Salem, Massachusetts, has re- 
cently explored the Mammoth Cave in Ken- 
tucky in the aid of science", and has visited sev- 
eral caverns never before entered. His inves- 
tigation have resulted iu finding colored fish 
without eyes, thus exploding the theory hith- 
erto held that all eyeless fish are colorless. 
White fish with eyes, and crayfish both with and 
without those organs, were obtained, present- 
ing many new features of great interest to nat- 
uralists. Skeletons of human beings, mounds, 
and a large variety of valuable aichseological 
relics were found in the new chambers. 



A new quality has lately been discovered to 
reside in autumn crocus, meadow saffran, or 
Colchichumautumnale, formerly used as a reme- 
dy for the gout and rheumatism — that of emit- 
ting a poisonous exhalation when its blossoms 
are opening. The touch of the flowers then 
imparts to the skin a yellowish green hue, de- 
scribed by M. Isidore Pierre, of the French 
Academy of Sciences, as being like that which 
"characterizes the human body in the early 
stages of decomposition." The effect passes 
off in a few seconds, but continued handling of 
the flowers in this stage induces numbness in 
the hand for some hours. 



Professor Young, of Darmouth college who 
was one of the observers of the transit of Venus, 
will return home by way of Egypt and India. 
He and Professor Watson, of Michigan Univer- 
sity, intend to make meteorlogical and astro- 
nomical observations in those countries. Pro- 
fessor Davidson, of tin's city, it will also be 
recollected will return by way of India, for the 
purpose of making scientific observations in 
that interesting portion of the East. 

Science Proving its Fruits. — Professor 
Tyudull's experiments on sound are already 
bearing fruit. The French government has ap- 
pointed a commission to conduct experiments 
upon a steam organ — the Calliope — heard 15 
leagues in fine weather at sea. These new ex- 
periments are to be made during the period of 
the equiooctial gales. 

Irregularity in the Earth's Kotation. — 
Professor Newcomb, of the Naval Observatory, 
Washington, asserts that the time of the earth's 
rotation on its axis is not strictly uniform. 
For twenty years prior to 1860 the rotation was 
slightly slower than the average. Since 1860 it 
has been accelerated. 



Spontaneous Combustion.— In a paper on 
the spontaneous combustion of hay, H. Kanke 
says that in consequence of a prolonged fer- 
mentation, hay can be transformed into a true 
coal, which, when exposed to the air at some- 
what elevated temperatures, acts as a pyro- 
phoius. 

An encouraging feature of the times is the 
increase in the number of scientific lectures, 
and the advance made in scientific literature. 



Proeessor W. D. Whitney has been elected 
an 'honorary member of the London Philologi- 
cal Society. 



36 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS 



[January 16, 1875* 



Mining Stocks. 

While there has been considerable excite- 
ment in the Btock market during the past week 
prices have declined very materially. The 
cloudy and rainy weather seems to have had a 
depressing effect, though the contrary should 
he the case. The "little piece of porphyry " 
struck in Ophir has had the effect of tumbling 
that stock down and bringing others with it. 
The decline is not considered permanent, and 
most people think it is not yet time for the big 
break. The letter from California dated the 
10th says: 

On the 1400-foot level, 200 feet north of the 
southern boundary, cross-cut No. 1 ia now in 
203 feet, and has penetrated the ore vein a dis- 
tance of 25 feet. The ore vein as crossed va- 
ries very much in value, assaying from $52.80 
to $300 per ton. The face of the drift to-day 
does not look as favorable as it did yesterday. 
Judging from the cross-outs on the level bulow, 
the vein on this level must be of great width. 
On the 1500-foot level east cross-cut No. 3 has 
been extended the past week 10 feet, and is 
now in 98 feet. The ore is identical in appear- 
ance and value with that found in cross-cut No. 
1 on the southern boundary. Oross-cut No. 2, 
100 feet from the southern boundary, is now in 
78 feet, and has not as yet reached the ore 
body. The rock passed through is v^ry hard. 
Cross-cut No. 1 on the southern boundary is 
now in 230 feet. The ore passed through the 
past week and now in the face of the drift is of 
a very high grade. 

A dispatch three days later than the letter 
states that the rich ore improves in the face 
and all signs of the wall have disappeared. 
The ore is now 314 feet broad. The new shaft 
is 1040 feet eaBt of the old one. One-third of 
this distance is already covered by the ascer- 
tained breadth of the ore, and the same trend 
of the vein may carry the No. 1 oross-cut quite 
to the new shaft, which will then not be far 
enough east. 

The Lady Bryan trustees have caught the ' 'in- 
crease of capital stock" fever. They propose 
with the consent of the stockholders, to in- 
crease from $50,000 to $300,000-six for one. 

The Iowa mining company also propose to 
increase the capital stock from $3,000,000 to 
$9,000,000 in 90,000 shares. 

The dividends declared this month are as 
follows: Beloher, $3 per share, or $312,000; 
Crown Point, $2 per share, $200,000; Consoli- 
dated Virginia, $3 per share, $324,000; Eureka 
Consolidated, 50 cents per share, $25,000; Rve 
Patch Consolidated, 25 cents per share, $7,500. 
This makes a total of $868,500. 



MINING SHAREHOLDERS' DIRECTORY. 



Compiled every Thursday from Advertisements in the Mining- and Scientific Press and 

other S. F. Journals.] 



ASSESSMENTS.— STOCKS ON THE LIST OF THE BOARDS. 



Company. 



Location. No. Ami. Levied. Heling'nt. Sale. Secretary. Place of Business, 



American Flat M Co Washoe 

Andes SMOo Washoe 

Arizona & Utah M Co AVaahoe 
Arizona SM Co' Unionville Nevada 

Baltimore Cons M Co Washoe 

Bellevne M 0" Placer Co Cal 

Bowery Oona M Co Ely District 

Caledonia S M Co Washoe 

Chariot Mill A M Co San Diego Co 

Daney M Co Washoe 

Empire Mill & M Co Washoe 

Florida S M Co Washoe 

Globe OobsM Oo Washoe 

Globe M Co Washoe 

Golden Chariot M Co Idaho 

Hale 4 Norcrcns S M Co Washoe 

Imperial S M Co Washoe 

Indus G & S M Co Washoe 

Iowa M Oo Washoe 

Justice M Co Washoe 

Kentuck M Co W ashoe 

Knickerbocker M Co Washoe 

Lady Washington M Co Washoe 

Mahogany UiSMCo Idaho 

Mint G & S M Co Washoe 

New York Cons M Co Washoe 
Original Gold Hill G&SM Co U'ashoi 



1 00 
fiO 
75 

I 00 

1 00 
50 
20 

3 00 
50 



75 
1 SO. 
SCO 
I 00 



5 00 
1 00 
1 50 



Overman S M Co 
Page Tunnel Co 
Pioche S M Co 
Pioche West Ex M Co 
Red Jacket M Co 
Savage M Co 
Sierra Nevada S M Co 
Silver Cord M Co 
South Chariot M Co 
Thrift G A S M Co 
Tyler M Co 
Utah S M Co 



Washington & Creole M Co 
Yellow JaoketSMC* 



Washoe 

Utah 

Ely District 

Ely District 

Idaho 

Washoe 

Washoe 

Idaho 

Idaho 

Calaveras Co Cal 

Washoe 

Washoe 



300 
1 00 
1 00 



Dec 7 
Deo 7 
Deo 10 
Nov 30 
Dec 5 
Dec 10 
Deo 15 
Jan 8 
Dec 24 
Jan 12 
Dec 28 
Jan 8 
Dec 10 
Deo 10 
Jan 4 
Jan 8 
Nov 26 
Dec 30 
Jan 13 
Jan 12 
Dec 3 
D c28 
Deo 17 
Jan 5 
Nov 17 
Dec 5 
Dec 12 
Dec 1 
Dec 12 
Dec 11 
Dec 28 
Nov 28 
Dec 5 
Dec 1 
Jan 2 
Jan 9 
Nov :'4 
Nov 19 
Nov 25 
Dec 8 
Deo 10 



Jan 9 
Jan 11 
Jan 14 
Jang 
Jan 8 
Jan 14 
Jan 25 
Feb 12 
Jan 23 
Feb 16 
.Tii ii 29 
Feb 10 
Jan 14 
Jan 14 
Feb 8 
Feb 11 
Dec 29 
Jan 30 
Feb IS 
Feb 12 
Jan 5 
Jan 30 
Jan 21 
Feb 11 
Deo 22 
Jan fi 
Jan 14 
Jan 5 
Jan 20 
Jan 21 ' 
Feb 3 
Jan 5 
Jan 1 
Jnn 5 
Feb 5 
Feb 16 
Dec 26 
Jan 21 
Dec 30 
Jan II 
Jan 13 



Jan 27 
Feb 1 
Feb 2 
Jan 29 
Jan 29 
Feb 4 
Feb 28 
Mar 5 
Feb 13 
Mar 9 
Feb 18 
Mar 2 
Feb 2 
Feb 2 
Fpb2S 
Mar 5 
Jan 19 
Feb 18 
MarlO 
Mar 2 
Jan 28 
Feb 19 
Feb 8 
Mar 4 
Jan IS 
Jan 25 
Feb L 
Jan2f> 
Feb 20 
Feb IB 
Feb 25 
Jan 28 
Jan 27 
Jan 26 
Feh2fi 
Mar 9 
Jan 16 
Feb 12 
Jan 20 
Feb 4 
Feb 13 



O A Sankey 
M Landers 
J Maguire 
Win Willis 
D T Bagley 
D F Vevdenal 
OE Elliott 
R Wegener 
F Swift 
G R Spinney 
W E Dean 
L Hermann 
J Ma -'u i re 
J Maguire 
L Kaplan 
J F Lishtner 
W E Dean 
D Wilder 
A D Carpenter 
J S Kennedy 
F Swift 
H Boyle 
ll C Kibbe 
C B Hlggins 
D A Je mugs 
H C Kibbe 
W M Helman 1 
G D Edwards 
JHaidy 
O E Elliott 
T L Kimball 
Wm Willis 
E B Holmes 
GD Edwards 
Frank Swift 
O H Bogart 
H R West 
O D Squire 
W E Dein 
F D Olesrv 
G W Hopkina 



331 Montgomery at 

507 Montgomery 8t 

419 C hforaia st 

419 California st 

401 California st 

409 California at 

419 California st 

414 California at 

419 California st 

320 California st 

419 Oa ifornia Bt 

1 1 Pine st 

419 California st 

419 California s! 

Merchants' Ex 

433 California st 

419 California st 

Mtrchan's* Ex 

6li5 Clay at 

Merchants' Ex 

419 California st 

Stevenson's Bldg 

419 California st 

402 Montgomery st 

401 Calilorniast 

419 California st 

'ireman's Fund Bldg 

414 California st 

418 Oalifornia st 

419 California st 
409 California st 
419 Oalifornia st 
419 California st 
414 California st 
419 California st 

■102 Montgomery fit 

210 MontKomery Bt 

Stevenson's Bldg 

419 California st 

Merchants' Ex 

Gold Hill 



OTHER COMPANIES— NOT ON THE LISTS OF THE BOARDS. 



Baltic Cons M Co 
Calaveras Hydrauhc M Co 
Combination G & S M Co 
Con Reforma L & S M Oo 
Edith Quicksilver M Oo 
Enterp iBe Oons M Co 
Equitable Tunnel M Co 
Florence M Oo 
■420" M Co 



Washoe 

Cal 

Panamint 

Lower Cal 

Cal 

Oal 

Utah 

Humboldt Co Oal 

Washoe 



San Diego county yielded $193 000 in gold 
bullion in 1874. There are now 60 Btampa at 
work in Julian and Banner districts, and the 
yield for 1875 will be much larger. 



Sales at the S. F. Stock Exchange. 



Last Week. 

Thubsdat, January 7. 
mobning session. 

920 Ophir 31C@315 

100 ....b 10 325 

3355 Mexican 68@li 

1780 G&O 56^60 

1745 Best A Bel 67@12 

l'fl ....blO 70(al74 

260 Savage. 18&£®190 

2K5 Chollar tJ6@90 

26U H 4N 65>$f~- 

445 Crown Pt 45f 

275 Jacket 147(5. 

10 ....b 30 153 

1205 Imperial 17u$1S 

645 Empire 14@15 

ISjO UonG Hill 6& 

240 Kentuck 22J£@24 

1005 Belcher 55@57 

100 Am Flag . m iH 

3190 Andes 14@10» 

1225 Belmont 14913M 

500 Caledonia 30;d 33 

210 Eureka Con. ...14^@l3^ 

fift Exoheq 4AI0@395 

3210 Kossuth 5@5« 

225 Justice 120ia)Hu 

2515 Julia 19.S16 

1820 Lady Wash m\ 

2300 Lady Bryan ?>s(g)~- 

3664 Leo 8M.L 

b25 Confidence..' 45fta46 

205 Con Vir 643@70D 

10 ....b5 S60 

1785 SierraN 2S@27M 

690 Daney 2Ji@8Ji 

250 California 72U@790 

790 ,...b30 

10 Excheq. 

705 Overman 

115 Justice 115(05120 

355 Succor 1C" 

2170 Lxdy Bryan 

97ft Julia 18(c 

350 Caledonia 29.!* 

545 Knickerbocker eS56Ji 

420 Globe l'sW'H-i 

1140 BaltOon WKpoS 

720 Alpha 4U(ri>43 

195 Meadow Val 6'. t :a:K 

160 Pioche 4 

415 Ray A; Ely 25 

520 Rye Patch 4@3 r 

110 Seg Bel 14001. 

AFTERNOON SESSION. 



This Week. 

Thobsdat, January 14. 

mobning session. 

1140 Ophir 165@183 

20 ....b 30 192 

8090 Mexican Gz!@58 

200 ,...b 5 54@M 

605 Gould & Curry 55W57 

i'.'fiO Best <fc Belcher 61@ft3 

400 Savage 147@151 

56 ....b 30 155 

425 Chollar. 86@75 

170 Hale &Norcross...52<*56 
705 Crown Point 44@4S 

20 ....b 5 U& 

70 ....h30 4ft>£®4fi 

230 Yellow Jacket. ..135@140 



Gold MtGMCo Holcomb Valley t'al 
Gold Run M Co Nevada Oo Oal 

Golden Rule S M Co Utah 

Hayes G4SMfio Robinson Hist 

Illinois Central M Co Idaho 

Independence Cons M Co t: al 

Juniata i ^ns S M Co Aurora Nev 

Kennedy M Co Amador Co Cal 

Kevsione No 1 & 2 M Oo Arizona 

Lake Tahoe & S F Water Works Cal 
Martin <fc Walling M 4 M Co „ Cal 
New York M Oo Washoe 

Vorth Blooinfield Gravel M Co Cal 

North Fork M Co Plumas Co Cal 

Oneida m Co Amador Co Oal 

Pinto M Co White Pine 

Rattlesnake Quioksilver M Co Cal 

South Fork M 4 Canul Oo i-al 

Star Ki"g S M Co Elko Co Nevada 

Wells, Fargo & Co M Co Washoe 

Wyoming G M Co Oat 

Yarborongh S M Oo 



Kern Co Cal fi 



15 


Nov 18 


Deo 23 


Jan 20 


B Burris 


5 


Dec 7 


Jan 9 


Jan 25 


A Shear 


111 


Dec 28 


Feb 1 


Feb 23 


D Wilder 


Ml 


Dec 24 


Jan 30 


Feb 20 


A D Carpenter 


'20 


Dec 23 


F-b 3 


Feb 23 


W Stuart 


12HDec 26 


Feb 6 


Mar 3 


F J Hermann 


25 


.Ian 12 


Feb 17 


Mar 9 


C S Healy 


HI 


Deo 5 


Jan 8 


Feb 3 


I E Delavau 


1 (111 




Feb 2 


Feb 20 


E F Stone 


50 


Nov 19 


Doc29 


Jan 23 


J P Cav/illier 


fll 


Dec 7 


Jan 11 


Feb 3 


C C Palmer 


5 


Dec 8 


Jan 15 


Feb 15 


K Wet-ihenner 


il'l 


Jan 4 


Feb 12 


Mar 8 


G K Spinney 


3(1 


Deo 24 


Jan 30 


Feb 23 


R H Brown 


10 


Jan 9 


Feb 17 


Mar 10 




1 (HI 


Declfi 


Jan 21 


Feb 10 


C S Neul 


1 (ill 


Dec Ifi 


Jan 20 


Feb 10 


A Wisael 


1 III) 


Dec 12 


Jan (2 


Febl 


WRTownsend 


25 


Nov 18 


Dec 23 


Jan 18 


E Ohattin 


50 




Jan 8 


Jan 23 


J W Tripp 
H O Kibbe 


50 




Jan 6 


Jan 25 


1 ni> 




Jan 4 


Jan 2ft 


I Derby 


75 




Jan 4 


Jan 19 


A Martin 


I no 


Dec 11 


Jnn lfi 


Feb 3 


L Kaplan 

A K Durbrow 


to 


Jan 9 


Fob 15 


Mar 8 


1 25 


Dec 24 


Jan 28 


Feb 19 


A Baird 


5 


Dec 7 


Jan 10 


Febl 


H Knapp 
L Kaplan 


Wi 


Dec 4 


Jan 8 


Jan 2ft 




Deo 21 


Jan 30 


Feb 18 


A O Tat lor 


51) 




Feb 13 


Marl 


W J Gunn 


30 


Dec 23 


Jan 30 


Feb 23 


E Barry 



507 Montgomery st 

321 Batter st 

Merchants' Ex 

605 Clay Bt 

113 Liedesdorn st 

418 Kcarnv st 

Merchants' Ex 

220 Mont ornery st 

419 California st 

513 California st 

41 Market st 

530 Clay st 

320 California st 

402 Montgomery st 

'418 Kearny Bt 

419 Oalifornia st 

210 California st 

330 Pine st 

808 Montgomery Bt 

40S California st 

419 California st 

320 Oalifornia Bt 

520 Washington st 

Merchants' Ex 

43? California st 

316 California st 

306 Montg mery et 

M»m chants' Ex 

331 Montgomery Bt 

410 MontKomery st 

415 Montgomery Bt 



MEETINGS TO BE HELD. 



Name of Co. 

Belcher M Co 
Buckeye G & S M Co 
California M Co 
California M Co 
Consoliriated Virginia 
(Jould 4 Curry S M Co 
Iowa M Oo 
Kossuth M Oo 
Ladv Bryan M Co 
Pattern M Oo 
Pioche We«t Ex M Co 
Raymond & EU M Oo 
Saw Pit Flat Cons M Co 
Sierra Nevada S M Co 
Succor M 4 M Co 
Union Oons M Oo 



Location. 

Washoe 

Washoe 
Washoe 
Washoe 
Washoe 
Washoe 

Washoe 

Ely District 

Ely Dist iot 

Cal 

Nevada 

Washoe 

Washoe 



Secretary. 

H C Kibbe 
Called by Trustes 
Called by Trustees 
D T BagU-y 
Called by Trustees 
Called bv Trustees 
Called by Trustees 
E F St ne 
Called by Trustees 
L Hermann 
T L Kimball 
T W Colburn 
J W Clark 
R Wegener 
Called by Trustees 
Called by Trustees 



Office in S- F. 

419 Oalifornia st 
331 Montgomery st 
401 California st 
401 California st 
401 California *t 
438 California st 

605 Clay st 
419 California st 
419 Califo- nia Bt 

330 Pine st 
409 Calilorniast 
418 California st 
418 Oaliforniii st 
414Culifornin st 
302 Montgomery st 
Merchants' Ex 



meeting-. 

Annual 
Special 
Special 
Annual 
Special 
Special 
Special 
Annual 
Special 
Annual 
Annual 
Annual 
Annual 
Annual 
Special 
Special 



Date, 

Jan 26 
Jan 20 
Jan2li 
Jan 20 
Jan 26 
Jan 25 
Feb 16 
Jan 18 
Feb 11 
Jan 28 
Jan 22 
Jan 26 
Feb 10 
Jnn 20 
Jan 30 
Jan 23 



LATEST DIVIDENDS (within three months)— MINING INCORPORATIONS. 



Name of Co. 

Belcher M- Oo. 
Chariot MiMCo. . 
Consolidated Virginia M Co 
Crown Point M Co 
Diana M. Co. ^ 

Eureka Consolidated M L.0 
Rye Patch M Co 



Location. Secretary. 



Washoe. 

Cal 

Washoe 

Washoe 

Nev 
Nevada 



H O. Kibbe, 
Frflnk Swift 
D T Bauley 
O E Elliott 
N. C. Fa-oet. 
W WTraylor 
D F Verdenal 



Office in S. F. 

|419 California st 
4i9 Calilorniast 
401 California st 
414 California st 
220 Clay st. 
419 Oalifornia Bt 
^409 California st 



3 00 

2 00 

1 00 

60 



Payable. 

Jan 11 
Nov 16 
Jan 11 
Jan 12 
Jan . 25 
Jan 5 
Jan 9 



..b5.. 



140 



705 Ray & Ely.. .... 

540 Eur Con 14M@l4Js 

200 W Creole *6 

170 Am Flag 1®AM 

300 Pioche 35* 

1325 Belmont 13^14 

2i5 Independence 2 

85 Chariot Mill 3 

340 Golden Chariot.... 2^@3 

100 IdaEUmore 

125 Mahogany.... 

1020 Newark %@l 

55n M Belmont 2@'&j 

780 Eldo South ZX@&( 

50 Uherry Creek 2 

fc300 SOhariot ,....-l}£ 

650 Bullion'. 47@48 

590 Utah 93*^)10 

65 Bacon 

510 SHill l-„- 

115 Eolipse UH@n%i 

170 Trenoh m ' ! '■'.. 

705 Oballensre U gfij I ' 

233> Dayton &tiC" 

1775 Rock Is 9MS 



1740 Imperial 18}<S@19 

50 ,...b 5 S3* 

410 Empire I3@13?i 

151 Kentuck 19ftfll9^ 

995 Alpha 28^31 

85 Ecfii'se ll@12 

595 Belcher 50M(a51 

50 ....b 5 61 

330 Confidence 40@4? 

450 Con Virginia 670[g)595 

330 SierraNevada....l91$@20 

350 Daney 2M@2?4 

187 California 56o@599 

b 30 ... 590 

260 Overman 73®80 

155 Justice 130@135 

100 Succor 4 

95 Union 72K@75 

570 Lady Bryan 8@9i$ 

200 Julia 78@9 

2*0 Globe m@lM 

235 Caledonia 2%24 

90 Bullion 35@36 

lf-5 Utah §5)1 

180 Silver Hill 10@lok 

70 Challenge II 

570 Dayton 4*6 

AFTERNOON SESSION. 

1900 Meadow Valley 7j2S 

1045 Kaymond 4 Ely 33^*3^ 

770 Eureka Consolidated. .15 

50 Pioche t& 

220 WHSh&Creole l@l>g 

520 American Fl8g..2K@3 ] .£ 

3005 Belmont I0@U 

465 Newark MM>i 

970 Rye Patch 3>^®3!^ 

170 Eldorado South 2 

200 Eldorado North 50o 

230 Chariot Mill...- .Ay&C 
Ifli' Ida Elmore 

55 Mahogany . 

100 Empire 1 

165 Bock Island 5J£@6 

400 Pictou .75c 

170 New Torh 5@5W 

1785 Occidental 5S@6 

110 American Flat...7W@7k 

750 .-enator l$J<a2 

2435 Phil Sheridan... .2}4@2& 

535 Woodville 3J4®3^ 

20 Mmt \ 

420 Lady Washington2 &f@3 

985 Kossuth 4Ji945i 

650 Sen Rock Island 13£ 

175 Andes Il@llj8 

300 Puclflo „.'|Q 

150 Niagara - t 

600 Ward 4% 

65 Scorpion 40H>4 

760 Cosmopolitan lJ£@l:Hi 

2260 Leviathan 2>5@2?i; 

1500 Georgia lj| 



New Incorporations. 



:*K 



The following companies have filed certificates of in- 
corporation in the County Clerk's Office, San Francisco. 

Original Floweby M. Co., Jam. 7.— Location: 
Flowery district. State of Nevada. Capital stock, 
$5 000,000, in 60,000 shares. Directors— R. N. waves, 
O. H Bogart, Thos. R. Hayes, R. O. Dyer and D. L. 
McDonald. , _ _. „ 

Allen Consolidated M. Co., Jan. 7.— Location: 
Storey county, Nevada. Capital stock, S2.500.000 in 
50 000 Bhares. Directors— Jas. A. Pritchard. F. Vassault, 
Geo. M. Pinney, Joseph Clark and T. J. Owens. 

Jacob Little Consolidated M Co.. Jan. 7.— Loca- 
tion- Storey county, Nevada. Capital stock, $10,000,000. 
Jas. A. Pritchard, Louis A. Booth, Martin White, Aaron 
M. Burns and Wm. M. Pierson. 

Silver Central Consolidated M. Co., Jan. 7 .- Lo- 
cation- Devil's Gate and Chinatown mining districts, 
Lyon county. Nevada. Capital Stock. $10,000,000. 
Directors— George Atkinson, A. B. Forbes, Jas. Duffy, 
Oliver Eldridge and Adolphus Waitz. 

Alhambra Quicksilver M. Co., Jan. 9.— Location: 
Sonomacounty. Capital stock, $5,000,000. Directors- 
Fred Clay, O. D. Morrison, John Sroufe, S. Schreiber 
and R. Von Pfister. . . 

Columbia S. M. Co., Jan. 10.— Location: Virginia 
district, Nevada. Capital stock, $10,000,000, in shares 
of $100 each. Directors— Thos. B. Lewis, John Skae, 
L Goodwin, R. H. Graves and P. J- Kennedy. 

Humboldt Mill and Minlng Co .Jan. 10.— Location: 
State of Nevada. Capital stock, S6,000,u0». Directors- 
George Q. Barry, Hill Beachy, J. Guiaca, R. H. Brown 
and D Hardy. , „. , 

Calltobnia Linen Co., Jan. 11.— Object, to purchase, 
sell lease and rent real estate; to erect building there- 
on; tu purchase and sell patent rights; to manufacture 
goods from ramie, flax, cotton, wool and silk; to erect 
proper machinery, etc. Capital stock, $1,000,000. 
Directors— Henry F. Williams, Wm. W. Hanscom, 
Charles E. Barnes, W. K. Doherty, George Bower and 
D. McLaren. -=» , m 

Bonanza M. Co., Jan. 12.— Location: Utah Territory. 
Capital stock, 510,000,000. Directors— P. B. Horton, O. 
P. Hurley, John M. Johnston, D. C. McGlynn and 
Jacob O. Johnston. 

The following named company has filed a certificate 
of incorporation in the office of the County Clerk of 
Alameda County. 

Cabtbo Coal M. Co.— Location: Contra Costa and 
Alameda counties. Capital Btock, $1,000,000. Directors-* 
James Simpson. Jr., Patricio OaEtro, James A. Quinlan, 
J. R. Bent and L. P. Larue, 



Eagle Mining district in San Benito county 
has been formed, with the following boundaries : 
Beginning at Grogan's ranch, od the Tres 
Pinos, and running thence northerly to the 
Santa Ana grant; thence easterly to the Los 
Aeuiles, and continuing southerly on said grant 
to and connecting with the north line of Fresno 
county; thence in a southerly direction to the 
intersection of San Benito creek; thence down 
said creek to the place of beginning. 

Ditch Enterprise. — The Mountain Messenger 
states that a company of cnpitalistswill, as soon 
as the weather will warrant, commence the con- 
struction of a large ditch to convey water, for 
mining, from the lakes in the vicinity of Gold 
lake to the northern portion of the Sierra 
county. It will be a canal rather than a ditch, 
and capable of carrying at least 20,000 inches 
of water. The ditch will probably be 25 or 30 
miles long, and will furnish a full head of 
water the year round. 

• ; "^ 

Stjteo Tunnel. — The report of the Sutro 
tunnel for the month of December is as follows: 
Total number of feet made during the month, 
417. Total length ot tunnel at the beginning 
of the present month, 8,420 feet. Distance 
from header, 8,076 feet. Number of feet made 
at shaft number 2,341. The explosion of giant 
powder in the tunnel interfered somewhat with 
the progress of work, and reduced the number 
of working days in December to twenty-eight 
and a half. 



A. letter from Panamint says that Jones, 
Stewart & Co. recently purchased the Ophir 
mine for $21,000, and are after the Suniise, 
valued at $12,00(1. 

The mining laws of Reese River district have 
been changed so as to conform to the United 
States law of May 10th, 1872. 



Railroad Items. 

Few people outside of the State have anyi 
idea of the numerous railroads proposed and 
being built in California. Several narrow gauges 
roads are already in operation for short dis- 
tances, and there is but little doubt that within: 
the next few years railroads will be built in al* 
most every part of the State where one is 
needed. In another column will be found an 
account of the opening o f the largest narrow 
gauge road in Ihis State, that of the North Pa-i 
cine Coast, 51 miles of which has been com-i 
pitted. We append following items concern- 
ing railroad matters on this ccast: 

Mr. Thomas Flint, od6 of the parties inter-i 
ested in the Hollistt-r N. G. railroad, is jni 
town, says the Sauta Cruz Sentinel, and speaks 
very favorably as to the feasibility of building, 
the Hollister road. On the .preliminary sur-i 
vey, the heaviest grade was but 90 feet pe» 
mile, and none of the others over 50 feet. Hd 
is quite sanguine the road will be completed! 
within a year. They have a meeting nexb 
Monday to perfect their organization and se- 
cure the requisite amount of stock to enable! 
them to proceed. Some $30,000 has already 
been subscribed, and it only requires $34,00(1 
to secure an act of incorporation. 

Nearly the whole amount required to b* 
raised for the Sonoma and Marin railroad, ruj i 
the Petal unia Argus has been subscribed. Tht 
amounts agreed upon for the several localities 
especially interested are as follows: Petaluma 
$200,000; San Rafael, $50,000; along the route 
$50,000; total, $300,000. A considerable por. 
tion of the amounts outside of Petaluma hav* 
been subscribed, and no doubt is it-It that th 
balance will be forthcoming soon. It is the iin 
tion of the Board of Directors to employ ai 
engineer immediately and commence the suit 
vey. 

A company has been incorporated in Sal. 
Lake City to build a broad gauge railroad frop 
the terminus of the Utah Southern road, sev- 
enty-five miles southeast of Salt Lake, to tho 
navigable waters of the Colorado river, am 
will commence work immediately on the conn 
pletion of the Utah Southern, ot which abon 
sixty miles are completed, and the iron is beinp 
laid on the remainder at the rate of about hal 
a mile per day. 

Speaking of the San Lorenzo railroad, thl 
SanU Cruz Sentinel says: Mr. Silent, the enei 
gftic President of this company, has a force ( 
twelve men clearing the way for this road, ant 
if the weather is propitious, will have a fore < 
160 men at work this week, grading and fillinp 
The road will run on the north side of the Sffi 
Lorenzo river, between it and the pike, an 
will be pushed to completion as rapidly as oil) 
umstances will permit. 

Lucien B Healey, the surveyor, has abou 
compleied the survey of fhe San Lorena 
flume aud railroad. The former is about font 
teeu miles in length; the latter about eigb 
miles. It is expected that both be will coruplettt 
aud in operation by the first of May next. Th 
saw mill of the company is about ready 1 
turn out the new lumber for the flume. 

The Los Angeles Herald states that theproii 
pects of the Los Angeles and Pacific lai 
road project becoming something tangible 
grow brighter day bv day. The Centine! 
Land company, through whose lands theroK 
will run fn>m the point of leaving the water i 
the city boundary, are taking active interest i 
ihe road, and will contribute largely to its co) 
struction. 

The following is from the Carson (Nevadt 
Tribune: Yerington, Bliss & Co. intend rui 
ning a narrow gauge railroad from their mil 
on Lake Tahoe to their discharging point, oi 
mile this side of Spodher's slatioD. Mr. Bli 
has purchased two locomotives and eight mill 
of steel rails, which will be immediately shippi 
from Pensylvania. 

In round numbers the earnings of the St 
Rafael and San Quentin railroad during tt 
past vear amounted to $19,400, and the di 
burseiuent, $19,000. The bonded debt 
$40,000, interest all paid up; floating deb 
$2,600. 

It is reported that the Southern Pacific ro 
road company intend to build a parallel roi 
from Los Angeles to Panamint with that of .tl 1 
Los Angeles and Independence road, whit 
passes Panamint, and in which Senator Joni 
is largely interested. 

Work is going on briskly on the narro 
gauge railroad between Pescadero and Pi gee- 
Point. When completed this railroad w 
form a link to the great chain which will 
the early futute, connect San Francisco wii 
San Diego. 

Work has been commenced at the S, 
Francisco side of the narrow gauge railway 
Burlinghame. Grading is going on brisks 
and a large number of men are employed. 

Monterey Coal. — Speaking of the probal 
extent of the coal mines recently discover 
near Monterey, the Herald says: "The first d 
covery of coal was made about seven miles sot 
of here. Between these two mines, most if i 
all the other discoveries have been mad 
whioh leads to the opinion that the bed v 
prove to be at lesst seven miles in extent 
enough to make rich every inhabitant of Mi 
terey." 



January 16, 1875,] 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



37 



[iNING j|UMMARY. 



nT a 5 '°"f w '" ai1 '" raoatly comli-nsed from journals pub- 
lished id tU» mUirior.in proximity to tbe minea mentioned. 



California. 

AMADOR COUNTY. 

Down's Gravel Claim. — Amador Ledger, 
Jan. 9: On Saturday last we visited the olaim 
of H C. Downs & Co., located oti the grave] 
ran^e lying between Jackson and Sutter creek. 
It will require considerable labor and money to 
place the oliim in thorough working order, but 
th'i company have before them an inimeusn 
gravel deposit which will require years to ex- 
haust. With the fall (over 20U0 feet) aided by 
the Little Giant, a vast amount of gravel can 
be run off daily through the sluices. As work 
advances into the hill, the depth of gravel 
rapidly increases, and before the crest is reached 
a face of gravel of over 200 feet will be pre- 
eented, all of which, from the top to the bed- 
rock, contains gold. 

Thk Volunteer Quartz Mine.— We are in- 
formed that a rich strike was made iu the Vol- 
unteer mino, near this place, on Tuehday last. 
The yield of the rock taken out on that day is 
estimated by good judges to be not Ieus thau 
$1,000. The rock takt-n from this mine L?ls 
paid well from the surface, and iucreases in 
quality and richness as the shaft is snnk. , 

Looking Well. — We learn from Plymouth 
that the miuing prospeots of the neighborhood 
look very flattering. 

Thk Phoenix mine presents a prosperous ap- 
pearance of ore developed of a high grade. 

Thk Alpine never looked more promising 
than at preBeut. The maiu shaft is now down 
1700 feet with a ledge of pay rook ten feet in 
thickness between well dctiued walls. The 
•quality of the rock improves as greater depths 
are reached. 

CALAVERAS COUNTY. 

Scarcity of Water.— Calaveras Chronicle, 
Jan. 9: The long continued drouth, together 
with the cold weather in the mountains, is 
beginning to tell on the supply of water in the 
ditch. There is scarcely enough* to meet* the 
demand at present, and indications of an in- 
crease in the, near future are not favorable. 
There is no use in talking; we imbt have 
rain. 

Sinking Completed.— The sinking of the 
shaft in the Gwin mine, a hundred ft from the 
900-it level, is complete*!. The work of run- 
ning the 1000-ft level, for the purpose of strik- 
ing the north bonanza, will be immediately 
commenced. Meanwhile the batteries are 
steadily employed crushiug ore from tie levelB 
above, and everythiug connect d with the 
mine is in an eminently satisfactory condition. 

Up Country Gleanings.— Citizen, Jan. 9: At 
Mosquito, the olaim owned by Skinner and 
Lalranchi is being tested by a shaft sinking 
from the tunnel. The tunnel is run on the 
vein for a distanoe of 500 ft and rock above 
stoped out. The average of ore crushed from 
the mine has been about $48 per ton, wuile we 
are informed that refuse rock has paid from $8 
to $10 per ton. 

Miscellaneous ore is being hauled from the 
Josephine to Harris' custom mill for crush- 
ing. 

Wobk was re-commenced on the Champion 
last week, the rock looking as well as that re- 
cently crushed. 

Gouldson & Hurbebt had a crushing from 
the lode lately discovered by them; and were 
well satisfied with the result. They are still 
taking out rock. 

The new mill on the Enterprise was started 
last Wednesday. 

Henry <fc Son having purchased the Thoss 
mill have repaired it and will commence run- 
ning in a few days. 

The Zacatera has paid off a portion of its 
debt, and will shortly pay the Dalance. 

EC DORADO COUNTY 

An Inmenbe Strike. — Mountain Democrat, 
Jan. 9: Information reaches us from George- 
town that in the Woodside mine a five foot 
ledge has been developed, and our informant, 
possibly with more force than elegance, assures 
us' that "the quartz is perfectly lousy with 
gold." 

Georgetown Items,— The mining interests 
of this Bection of the -county are looking up. 
The Cedarberg company (which I believe is 
the only one in our county), are drilling holes 
at a rate that Would astonish any one not con- 
versant with the working of the same, and is a 
decided success. 

The International mine, Colonel Belty, 
superintendent, has developed a large ledge of 
ore filled with sulphurets, the rock assaying as 
high as $1,300 per ton. 

The Taylor mine is at present crushing ore 

at the rate of fifteen tons per day, and under 

the management of Mr. Walter Schmidt will 

prove a success. 

The Garden Valley Co. have commenced op- 

Jerations of a permanent nature. This mine is 

flT Jan extension of the Taylor mine, and from 

^1 present indications will prove a success. 

;^LAKE COUNTY. 

_ Mining Items.— Lake County Bee: Ledges of 

silver bearing rock have been discovered iu the 

vicinity of Highland Springs and in Scott's 

valley. 

A well-defined ledge of gold-bearing quartz 



has been discovered on the ridge that divides 
the waters of Russian river and Clear lake. 

MENDOCINO COUNTY 

Mininq District. — Mendocino Democrat, 
Jan. 9: The miners hereabout met last Thurs- 
day and orgauized the Ukiah mining district, 
electing S. Wurteuburg, Recorder. Tbe TJ. 8. 
general mining laws were adopted; twenty day* 
to record, a claim 1500 feet on the ledge, 300 
eitoh side. The distriot starts from Sanel 
district on the south, and runs up to neigbor- 
hood of Little lake. 

The miners of our Ukiah silver mine are pre- 
paring to s nd a ton of their ore to the city 
for reduction, as a test of the working capacity 
of their mine. Assavs are made from small 
specimens of ore, and are, consequently, often 
deceptive; but it is believed that a ton of the 
ore will give a reliable knowledge of the rich- 
ness of the mine. 

NAPA COUNTY. 

New Discovery'. — St. Helena Star, Jan. 7: 
Dr. Michel and J. J. Dickinson have struck a 
three-foot copper ledge on their chrome irou 
claim, in Mowe canyon. It is very rich ore, 
and we should judge will go over fifty per cent. 
Anyone who may wish to see a specimen, can 
do so by calling at Dickinson's store. 

Lively Quicksilver Troubles. — Napa lie-' 
porter Jan. 9: Iu the Fifteenth District Court on 
Thursday, a week ago, the Mammoth Consol- 
idated quicksilver oompany coinmenoed suit 
against the London quicksilver mining com- 
pany, to recover 15,000 feet of ground of the 
Mammoth Irdge situated in Lake county. Suit 
was also brought by Isaac Frank and others 
against W. W. Cook and Aaron Cook, to re- 
cover 13 20ths, or 3,000 feet of the Oriental 
quicksilver mining ground in Lake county. 
The Mammoth Consolidated quicksilver min- 
ing company aUo brought suit against the Lake 
Cuuuty quicksilver mining company, to recov- 
er possession of 4,000 feet in length by 1,000 
feetin width of the Mammoth location. The 
Mt. St. Helena quicksilver company also com- 
menced suit against the American quicksilver 
company to recover 2,700 feet of the Dead 
Broke, or Mt. St. Helena company's ground in 
Lake county. 

NEVADA COUNTY. 

Old Block Mine. — Gra?« Valley Union, 
Jan. 4: John Trenberth and others are working 
on the "Old Block" mine, which is located 
somewhere in the neighborhood of Grass Val- 
ley slide. Trenberth says they are putting 
down a shaft, and they are preparing to put 
in a "ninety." A "ninety" is a big Bteam en- 
gine, we believe. 

Omaha Mine.— Work on the Omaha is still 
being prosecuted with vigor, and the mine con- 
tinues to show well in good milling ore. The 
ledge is now nearly four, feet in thickuess and 
free gold can be seen in satisfactory quantities 
all through the quartz. 

New Tunnel. — Transcript, Jan. 1: The 
South Yuba canal company, are running a tun- 
nel about 1,200 feet long under the bill beyond 
the Manzunita mine, for the purpose of con- 
veying the water of the Snow Mountain ditch 
through it to the town and adjacent mines. 
The work was considered necessary, from the 
fact that the Manzanita company have washed 
away the hill nearly up to where the present 
ditch runs, and there is a liability of there 
being a cave which will carry away the ditch 
at any time, and shut off, not only the mine, 
but the town from water. The tunnel is eight 
feet wide and six feet high. Men are at work 
on both ends, and they have about 650 feet 
completed. The work was commenced in Oc- 
tober, and will be completed in about two 
months more. It is under the supervision of 
John W. Hart, who is doing a first-class job. 

The North Bloomfield mining company are 
at work piping and using their long tunuel 
for a flume. We understand it works to a 
charm and it is thought it has capacity enough 
to run off '11 the dirt they have water to wash. 

The Union gravel mining company have 
completed their tunnel at Kennebec hill, and 
are taking out gold in large quantities. 

Rich Strike. — We understand very rich 
rock has b<-en struck in the Home mine, sit- 
uated on Deer creek about two miles below 
town, just in front of the Wyoming mine. The 
ledge is owned by the Hon. Thomas Findley. 
Machinery and hoisting works were erected on 
it several years ago, and work done on if, but for 
some cau>e it was shut down. Recently work 
was again commenced and we learn very rich 
rock has been struck. We are pleased to hear 
of any rich strikes and are none the less glad 
because Thomas Findley is the owner. 

PLUMAS COUNTY. 

Dutch Hill. — Plumas National, Jan. 2; The 
water was turned into the North Fork com- 
pany's big pipe one day last week. Only fifty 
inches was started, and it seems that the work- 
men expected several bursts, as such a length 
of pipe is certain to have weak places it it. It 
had only bursted twice, at last accounts, and 
the managers were sanguine of tbe most com- 
plete success. It is thought best to wait for 
the freezing weather to end before turning in 
the water again. 
SAN MATEO COUNTY. 

Coal.— San Mateo Times, Jan. 9: Prof. 
Heroch, the mining expert, in company with 
J. C. Maynard visited the tunnel on the San 
Mateo and H df Moon Bay toll-road on Wed- 
nesday, and made an examination of the coal 
measures wuich Mr. Maynard has been pros- 
pecting. The indications are said to be ex- 
tremely favorable, so much so that arrange- 



ments will shortly be made to prospect the 
measure by means of boring. The principal 
obstacle hitherto has been water, iu itself a 
favorable indication, and this will be avoided 
by boring. 

SIERRA COUNTY 

Struck it liicn. — Mountain Messenger, Jan. 
9: The boys at Bunker hill, Little Grizzly, 
have at last ruu through the "big rock, " and 
sunk down 17 feet into a fine bed of blue gravel, 
said to be very rich. 

The Sierra Buttes and Independence mines 
are as prolific as ever of the yellow ore, and 
the numerous ledges around the town prom- 
ise a rich strike any day. All in all this min- 
ing district is one of the most promising in the 
county. 

Fohest City was never better. The two 
prospecting tunnels are being run, the North 
and South fork have made good headway re- 
cently, "and every prospect pi. 'aces." 

The Empire mining claim at Howland Fat, 
is paying finely, sayH report. 

Miners are beginning to find fault with the 
fine weather on account of the scarcity of 
water it foreshadows. 

Negotiations are in progress for the sale of 
the American company's claims at Morristown. 
It is one of the best mines in the county. 

Scales Diggings. — The miners are busy at 
work running powder drifts and tunnels. 
Water for hydraulic purposes has long since 
ceased, and from all appearances it will be a 
long time before there will be any more. Own- 
ers of mines say naught, but like the Dutch- 
man's boy, think considerably. 
TRINITY COUNTY. 

Important Transaction. — Trinity Journal, 
Jan. 9: The Bullychoop quartz mine is bonded 
to a San Francisco company for $60,000. Of 
this amount $10,000 is to be paid before any 
work is done on the ledge. The company is to 
erect a mill and other works, which, if the 
property is not satisfactory, can be turned 
over to the original company. A wag on road 
is to be built to the mine next spring. 
TUOLUMNE COUNTY. 

The Marks and Darbow. — This mine, situa- 
ted between the Raw Hide and Patterson, is to 
be developed as fast as possible. Work has al- 
ready commenced, and the Superintendent, G. 
P. Fisher, is confident of its proving one of the 
best mines in the county. A main working- 
shaft will be put down to strike the vein 50 feet 
below the surface at the shaft. From this a 
level will be run north, and as the hill rises 
very abruptly, a short distance will carry the 
tunnel 300 feet beneath the croppings, exposing 
enough ore, by s toping, to supply milling ma- 
chinery for some time to come, and while the 
work of further development still goes on. 

New Albany.— Sonora Democrat, Jan. 9: A 
few days since the workmen in this mine run 
into a vein of rook; samples of which we have 
seen; they are profusely filled with metal, gold 
being visible to tbe naked eye plentifully. This 
body of ore is reported seven feet wide where 
the samples were taken from, and gives a future 
prospect that must be very gratifying to the 



Nevada. 
Washoe district. 

Consnlidated Virginia. — Gold Hill News, 
Jan. 7: Daily yield, 400 tons, from 1550, 1500, 
1400 and 13u0-ft level. At the 1550-ft level, 
good progress is being made in the winze being 
sunk 300 feet from the northern boundary. It 
ib now over 100 ft deep in very high grade ore. 
The main north and south drift at this level has 
passed through into the California ground 35 ft : 
and the face is still iu high grade ore. The last 
400 feet of this drift, northward, has no poor ore 
in it. The east cross-cut, at this level (the 1550) 
300 ft from the northern boundary is in 65 ft 
from the main north and south drift, all the 
way very high grade ore, and the face shows 
still higher grade ore. At the 1500-ft level, the 
cross-cuts east, coniinue in high grade ore, and 
have not yet reached the east wall. Cross-out 
No. 2, which is the most advanced, is now in 
over 300 ft in excellent ore, and has not yet 
reached the east wall. This cross-cut is 130 ft 
from the northern boundary line. Cross-cut 
No. 1, 14 feet from the northern boundary line 
is now in considerably over 100 ft, in the richest 
kind of ore. At the 1400 ft level, the ore breasts 
are looking splendidly, and the north drift, 
which is far in advance of the ore breasts, con- 
tinues in fine ore, and is yet over 200 ft from the 
northern boundary line. The width of the ore 
at thispointis as yet unknown. The ore breasts 
at the 1300-ft level also continue looking and 
yielding finely, 

California. — At the 1550-ft level the main 
north drift, from the Gould & Curry has pene- 
trated this mine a distance of 35 ft, passing 
through very hiah grade ore. At the 1500-ft 
level, cross cut No. 3 east, 200 ft from the south- 
ern boundary, has penetrated the ore about 8 
feet. The ore is of the same rich character as 
that found in cross-cut No. 1 at the southern 
boundary. Cross-cat No. 2, 100 feet from the 
southern boundary, is in a distance of 70 ft, and 
is expeoted to reach the ore vein in a further 
distance of 40 ft. At the 1400-ft level, cross-cut 
No. 1, 200 ft from the southern boundary has 
penetrated the ore a distance of ten feet. The 
ore assays from $200 to $350 to the ton. A 
cross-cut east at the 1300-ft level, direetlv above 
that last mentioned, was commenced yesterday 
to run for the ore body. It will have to run 
200 feet to reach it. 

UTAH.—The work of grading for the new 
pumping machinery is well advanced. On the 
400-ft level the north drift has been extended 



14 ft into the vein and looks favorable. 

Lady Bryan.— New Bhaft 389 ft in depth. 
The various cross-cuts for the ledge and also 
to connect with the old workings of the mine 
are getting along finely. The ledge is very wide, 
probably 300 ft and some very rich bunches of 
ore have been found in its former workings. 

Chollar-Potosi.— Daily yield 35 to 40 tons, 
from old upper workings. The average assays 
from car samples is $25, the quality of ore 
yielded not being quite so good as heretofore. 
The ore sections show no change for the better. 
Ophir.— Dailv yield 250 tons from tbe 1465 
and 1300-ft levels, and the atopes and floors be- 
tween. The average richness of this product is 
constantly increasing, giving better bullion re- 
turns. At these two important levels the ore 
bodies both ea*t and west are looking and 
promising splendidly, and the north winze be- 
lowlhe 1465-ft level is now down about 30 ft 
in very rich ore whioh shows still richer as the 
winze penetrates deeper into it. Ore of extra- 
ordinary richness is found in the oross-cute 
from the bottom of the winze below this level, 
near the Calfornia line. The other prospecting 
and developments are progressing finely and 
most auspiciously under the best of manage- 
ment. From what is Been and developed of 
tbe great bonanza in this mine, it evidently 
bears to tbe north and east, and the Ophir will 
get a very good slice of it. It may even extend 
entirely across it into the Mexican. 

Belcher. — Daily yield 45CJ tons. The old 
ore section, from the 1400-ft level up, are hold- 
ing out pretty well, with no new ore develop- 
ments, however in any direction. 

Gould & Curry. — The double winze sunk 
from the 1500-ft level, has attained a depth of 
268 ft below that point. The work in this 
winze is being vigorously prosecuted in order 
to connect sooner with ttie 1700-ft level, and 
thereby enable the company to cross-out the 
vein and develop the lower level. 

Justice — The poweiful and costly new hoist- 
ing and pumping machinery was started up 
for trial last Mounday for the first time, and 
operated finely. 

Best & Belcher. — On tbe 1500-ft level tbe 
double winze has been sunk to a depth of 268 
ft below it. This level will soon connect with 
tbe 1700-ft level drift, and the company is 
pushing the work in this winze with great 
energy. 

Phil Shbbidan. — Main west drift in 195 ft 
to day. Ovei half the faoe is in very promis- 
ing quartz; and the rest in dark clay and 
quartz. 

Occidental. — The extensive body of ore ex- 
posed by the several cross-cuts contains 
sufficient metal to be remunerative when ac- 
tively worked, and at present looks very favor- 
able. 

Crown Point. — Daily yield, 550 tons. The 
old ore producing sections from the 900-ft 
level down, continue to give forth their regular 
yield, and will hold out for a long time yet, 
and some is coming from the 1500-ft level. 

Mexican.— The drift from the 1465-ft level 
of tbe Ophir has advanced to within about 30 
ft of the south line of the Mexican, and shows 
a small streak of good ore, whioh is considered 
encouraging. 

Sierra Nevada. — Sinking the new shaft is 
progressing at a lively rate in favorable ma- 
teral. The machinery at the old shaft is being 
repaired and put in good order; the requisite 
repairs to the timbering of the shaft is being 
done preparatory to sinking 100 ft deeper, giv- 
ing a total depth to the Bhaft of 800 ft. 

Hale & Noroboss. — Daily yield about 100 

tons from the old upper workings of the mine. 

Julia. — The main north drift at the 1900-ft 

level is being advanced at the rate of three ft 

per day. 

Globe Consolidated. — In the face of the 
west drift at the 400-ft level, the character of 
the rock is changing fast for the better. 

Woodvillb. — New shaft down 78 ft. The 
ore stopes south in the 200 and 300-ft levels, 
are looking better than at our last report. 

Andes— This mine, which lieB directly west 
of the Consolidated Virginia and California 
mines, and adjoins the old Mexican mine on 
the south, is located on a west ledge, which 
from the present good showing bids fair to de- 
velop a bonanza of ore that will rival that of 
its neighbors. Ore heretofore thrown aside as 
waste, is now found to assay $46 to the ton. 
A fine large body of black sulphuret ore is de- 
veloped in this mine. 

Dayton. — The third compartment of the 
shaft is completed, and the total depth of the 
same is 330 feet. Sinking deeper is now about 
being resumed. No change to report in the 
ore sections. Daily yield of ore, 60 tons. The 
amount of ore extracted in December was 
1,755 tons. Amount Bhipped to Woodworth 
mill for reduction, 1,755 tons. Average car 
Bamples assay, silver, $7.10; gold, $34.96; total 
$42.06. 

Nevada.— A fine showing of ore is developed 
in the old upper workings of this mine, there 
being a large chimney of it. This is not high- 
grade ore, but will pay well for milling. 

Rook Island.— Sinking the main shaft goes 
on vigorously, and the winze below the 200-ft 
level has been giving a better showing in the 
way of good little bunches and spots of ore the 
last few days. 

Daney — The face of the north drift at the 
400-ft level is in low grade ore which shows 
considerable improvement. 

Sucooe.— The main drift at the 550- ft level is 
to-day in 105 ft., with its face in very encour- 
aging vein matter, including considerable 
quartz. The ledge is evidently near by. The 
shaft ia down 595 feet, or 45 ft below the 550-ft 
level. 



38 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



[January 16, 1875 



Panamint^What " The Company" is 
Doing. 

The Panamint News says : The Surprise Valley 
Mill and "Water company, H. A. Jones, Gen- 
eral Superintendent, Capt. James Messic, Man- 
ager, is invariably known as "The Company," 
and doubtless always -will be known as the 
Company, on account of its gigantic operations, 
although dozens of other companies may be 
operating at the same time. To give some 
idea, though by no means complete, of what 
the company is doing at the present time, we 
will state that work is being actively prosecu- 
ted on the following mines: Hudson River, 
Harrison, Alabama, Hemlock and Wyoming, 
all on the south side of town, and on the Ja- 
cobs' and Stewart's "Wonders, on the north 
side. Several of these, particularly the Wy- 
oming and the Wonders, are being attacked by- 
shaft and tunnel in four or five places each. 
Not one but what is yielding splendidly, and 
have large piles of good ore on each dump. 
Good trails or narrow roads have been blasted 
out. at great expense to all; these trails are 
from one to three miles inlength; most of them 
have been cut to a grade suitable for tramways. 
At present the ore (all shipping or sack ore) 
from the Wyoming is brought down upon 
strong iron-shod sleds, each drawn by a pow- 
erful mule, and each bringing 
.three loads a day of about 
eleven huT:dr*=d pounds each; 
six of the?e ?leds are in use 
at this mine, but numbers of 
others are being made ready 
as fast as possible. Two tint 
rock-breakers, driven by 
steam, are engaged a good 
share of the time upon ores 
from this and the Jacobs' 
Wonder. Before breaking, 
the ore is sorted, .the second 
quality being piled up for 
concentration here as soon as 
the mills are ready for work, 
the best quality being broken 
up fine and sacked for ship- 
ment. Forty tons of this 
class of ore was shipped during 
the last three days from th 
breaker at the upper end of 
town, and there are about sixty 
tons of the same sort ready 
for shipment. The average 
shipment from the Wyoming 
is nearly ten tons per day 01 
sack ore. The foundation for 
the twerjty stamp mill, with 
four Krom concentrators, is 
about ready for the masonry, 
but owing to the frosty nights 
-this portion of the work may 
be delayed a short time. The 
warehouse is ready for the 
metallic roof; it is sixty feet 
square inside, with stonewalls 
three feet thick. The present 
large canvas store is soon to 
give way to one of wood, still 
larger. The company ran f ou ' 
boarding houses, and we are 
told furnish good " grub. " 
They have stabling in thr 
course of erection for about 
two hundred animals. The 
whole number of employes is 
a little over 250. They fcav^ 
One mill complete and ready 
to run as soon as the pump 
to supply it with water arrives and is put in 
place, which will require not to exceed five 
days from date, the pump being due to-day. 
They have good second class ore on hand, or 
easily attainable, to keep one hundred stamps 
in constant operation, together with a corre- 
sponding number of concentrators. They will 
make this an exceedingly lively camp in a very 
few months, as they will need at least one 
thousand men when all their works are in full 
blast. There is one other thing worthy of spe- 
cial mention as regards the management of this 
company. That is, they have taken every pos- 
sible precaution to obtain perfect and undis- 
puted titles to every mine in their possession 
or claimed by them. They have undertaken 
huge work, taken altogether, and are managing 
it well. They are worthy of success* and we 
have not the slightest doubt they will attain it, 
and in so doing effect wonders for the welfare 
of Inyo county generally. 

The Belmont Courier tells of a settlement 
made by the men lately working for the Morey 
Mill company. The company failing to pay, 
the men demanded the delivery of a lot of bul- 
lion on hand, belonging tb the Morey Mining 
company. This was at first refused, but the 
men finally got away with thebullion, and took 
it to Belmont and sold it — paying themselves 
with the proceeds, 80 per cent, of their de- 
mands. 



The Big Bonanza. 

The Enterprise of the 6th instant says: The 
cross-cut 200 feet north of the south line of the 
California, on the 1400-foot level has reached 
the big bonanza, and penetrated it to the dis- 
tance of five or six feet. They reached the ore 
evening before last, and already tbe rock in the 
face of the cross-cut will go $300 per ton. The 
ore was reached much sooner than was antici- 
pated, which shows that the west wall did not 
bear so much to the eastward as it seemed to do 
when cut across in the Consolidated Virginia. 
It is now demonstrated that from the north line 
of the mine last named the west wall gradually 
curves back to the west. This being the case, 
and the east wall still bearing to the east, it 
would seem that we have as yet by no means 
seen the "bulge" of the bonanza. That grand 
center of interest — the "bulge" — is crowded 
still further north. Something is now known 
of the west side of the bonanza, but the east 
side is still widening away into the unexplored 
regions. The cross-cut 200 feet north of the 
California line, on the 1500-foot level, is also 
said to have been in ore a distance of two feet 
yesterday afternoon — much sooner than was 
expected — though its face has been showing 
much quartz for some days. The mine was 
visited yesterday afternoon by Captain Taylor, 



are stowed away, and at the Eureka Consoli- 
dated 75,000 bushels, while enough is being re- 
ceived to supply the daily demand, averaging 
1,500 bushels to each furnace' in operation. 
The product and shipments for the month of 
December, 1874, were as follows: 



Shipment. 
831,000 
775,284 
287,000 
251,000 



Furnaces. Pro&nct. 

Richmond 1,300,000 

Ewefca Consolidated 78i,744 

K.K. 260,000 

Hoosac 221,000 

Total pounds 2,565,744 



2,114,284 



Peavine. 

This mining district is so near to us, says the 
Truckee Republican, that we cannot do better 
than devote a portion of our space" to what is 
now being done to develop the interests there. 
Should this district prove to be as rich as all 
indications now promise, it will be an import- 
ant market for our lumber and wood. From 
Mr. B. Johnson, of Beno, who called at our 
office yesterday, we were able to learn the fol- 
lowing items of interest: The prospects in the 
mines there have been improving greatly within 
a short time past, and are now much better than 
ever before. A consolidation has been effected 
between the Paymaster and Poe~mines under 



State, Golden Fleece, Buckeye, Nellie Grant and 
others, all watching with great interest the result 
of the coming experiment .at the Consolidated 
Poe. There are already between twelve and 
twenty families already located there, and 300 
men employed and no idle men. The city sup- 
ports a store, a livery stable and three hotels. 
Since Thanksgiving eight houses have been 
built. Stages leave daily from Keno at 9 a. m. 
and arrive at 3 p. m. The place is called Poe 
City in preference to Peavine in honor of the 
company. The indications at this place are 
said to be better than those at Virginia city at 
the same stage of development and some ven- 
ture to predict another great bonanza. 




Bee-Hunting. 



The large illustration which we give en the 
first page of this, our holiday sheet, is decrip- 
tive of one of the notable incidents of coun- 
try life, namely, bee-hunting. Although bee- 
hunters in their reports of these adventures 
generally report satisfactory returns in honey, * 
they almost invariably dwell most on the 
pleasurable excitement attending the hunt. 
The programme of the bee-hunt varies some- 
what in different localities. 
A very common mode, and 
one which we will suppose is . 
being used by the parties in 
the accompanying picture is 
as follows: The hunters re- 
sort in the daytime to locali- 
ties where these wild swarms 
are supposed to exist, and 
endeavor to entice the bees 
away from their tree-hives, 
A common method to accom- 
plish this purpose is to ere- I 
ate a strong but agreeable 
odor, by filling the cells of 
old honey combs with anise- 
seed and burning it between 
heated iron or stones. This 
attracts the bees, and in tbe 
viciuity of these enticing 
fames, honey or some other 
bee food is placed. The bees 
feed on this. 



BEE HUNTING. 



Rich mineral discoveries are reported near 
San Fernando, Los Angeles county. A man 
named Slater has discovered within five miles 
of the town a silver ledge of some richness. 
Several finely prospecting gold ledges have 
been found in the same vicinity; also a cinna- 
bar mine of apparent richness. Coal is also 
reported to exist in the same vicinity. 

Of coal from a mine in Shasta county the 
Sacramento Union says; "It is a superior ar- 
ticle, equal to, if not better, than any other 
found in the State; it is of a glossy black, 
heavy and apparently free from sulphur," 



Superintendent of the Yellow Jacket, Mr, P. 
Deidesheimer, the well-known expert, Oscar G. 
Sawyer, correspondent of the New York Herald, 
Mr. Chauncy Land, mill man, formerly of the 
Land mill, Seven-mile canon, and by several 
other gentlemen taking an interest in mining 
matters, and all came to the surface perfectly 
stunned with the wealth seen by them during 
their underground travels. The only place 
where the bonanza has yet been crossed is at 
the south end, where cross-cut No. 3 passes 
through it. At this point they are beginning to 
breast out, and the breasts are opening into ore 
of wonderful richness, disclosing much of that 
character of ore known as " stephanite." "While 
below tbe foreman of the mine dug out and 
presented to Mr. Land a lump of this ore 
weighing about ten pounds. It was a beautiful 
specimen, and on reaching the surface Captain 
Taylor offered Mr. Land $20 for it, an offer 
which was promptly refused. We asked Mr. 
Taylor why he did not take a pick and dig out 
a specimen for himself. ""Well," said he, "I 
thought it would look a little too much like dig- 
ging into a man's safe." Mr. Sawyer says that 
if he writes the Herald a full account of what 
he saw they will think him the biggest liar on 
this side of .the Rocky mountains. The grand 
developments in the California were everywhere 
the subject of conversation on the streets and 
in the saloons yesterday afternoon and last 
evening. On the 1550-foot level the main drift 
north from the Gould and Curry has passed 
through into California ground a number of 
feet and is still in the same very rich ore through 
which it passed for such a great distance in the 
Consolidated Virginia. 

Etjeeea Bttllion. — The Eureka Sentinel 
says: The amount of bullion produced at the 
furnaces for the month of December far ex- 
ceeds the figures of the same month of 1873. 
This is owing to the favorable condition of 
the weather, the easy transportation of ore 
from the mines and the abundant amount of 
charcoal being brought to the fnrnaces. At 
the Richmond over 200,000 bushels of charcoal 



the name of the Consolidated Poe. This com- 
pany are now having a furnace built, and ex- 
pect to have it in operation Friday of this week. 
This is built by Mr. McGlew who is given 
$500 and takes the balance from the re- 
sults of the experiment, Tbe furnace is 
built at an expense of about $5,000. The com- 
pany have already about 350 tons of reck on 
the dump pile awaiting the completion of the 
furnace. This rock has been assayed. 
Twelve assays from the dump were shown our 
informant, which averaged from $42 to S10S 
per ton. As soon as this furnace is completed 
and this rock worked a reliable test will be ob- 
tained, and calculations can be made with 
great probability of their being accurate 
whether it will be advantageous to continue de- 
velopments in this district or not. The other 
companies are equally interested in the coming 
test, for in the event of this amount of rock 
paying according to the assay, they will have 
sufficient encouragement to put in capital 
enough to develop them all. There are crop- 
pings along the road between Reno and Pea- 
vine, where, in a thousand places prospects 
have been made with indications enough to in- 
duce further outlays of money in the event of 
success at the Consolidated Poe. The stock of 
this company is divided into 60,000 shares 
which have a market value of about $3—30,000 
shares are held by Mayor Brown, of St. Louis, 
Mo., 17.000 by the Bank of California, as col- 
lateral, it is said, and the remaining 13,000 by 
other men, many of them those that are at 
work developing the mine. There is a difficulty 
in working the rock from this mine, on account 
of the presence of antimony and iron which 
are separated with some difficulty. The rock 
after being milled, has to be roasted before it 
can be amalgamated. This difficulty seems to 
grow less as a greater depth is reached, This 
difficulty seems, to grow less as greater depth is 
reached. Our informant went down to the 100- 
foot level and found the ledge three feet in thick- 
ness and well defined. They have reached a 
depth of 175 feet with increasing prospects. 
"Besides theConsolidatedPoe there are theNeyada 



"Which pillage, they with merry 

march bring home 
To tbe tent repal of their Emperor"* 

The hunters follow them 
in their flight- and thus ascer- 
tain their retreats. At night 
they repair to the detected 
hiding place, provided with 
axes, torches and vessels for 
transporting their,sweet treas- 
ures to their homes. 

"We see them in the picture 
after the tree has been 
"felled, "removing the honey 
from the mammoth hive, or 
rude city of hives. The full 
moon is affording all the as- 
sistance she can urider — or 
rather over — the circum- 
stances, but tbe additional 
light of their pine torches is 
needed. Two or three hun- 
dred pounds of honey is "not 
an unusual yield from one of 
the bee trees. It happens 
sometimes that there is a 
large amount of old comb in the tree; the quality 
of the honey being injured thereby, and some- 
times too the honey is badly broken up by the 
breaking or jarring of the falling tree; but in 
many cases the stock is equal in every respect 
to the best hive honey, and is removed in good 
marketable condition. 



The Caeson Mint employs a force of 73 per- 
sons. It coins about $300,000 in gold per month, 
and about $200,000 in silver. The silver coinage 
has recently been confined to trade dollars, of 
which $50,000 were delivered to-day, and about 
$240,000 within the last month. Superinten- 
dent Crawford and Coiner Doane and the other 
officers state that the capacity of the mint is 
hardly half so large as it should be. Since its 
operations have become so extensive and im- 
portant it is found to be crowded in every de- 
partment. The Congressional delegation from 
Nevada is being urged to secure an appropria 
tion for the enlargement and improvement of 
tbe building. The sum needed for the work is 
about $250,000. 



New Ditch. — A company of capitalists, John 
Thomas, agent, will, as soon as the weather will 
warrant, commence the construction of a large 
ditch to convey water for mining, from the 
lakes in the vicinity of Gold lake to the north- 
ern portion of the county. It will be a canal 
rather than a ditch, and capable of carrying at 
reast 20,000 inches of water. The ditch will 
probably be 25 or 30 miles long and will fur- 
nish a full head of water the year round. — 
Downieville 



Wells, Faego & Co. shipped for the Man- 
hattan company, of Austin, during the month 
ending December 31st, ninety-one bars of bul- 
lion, weighing 9,228 pounds, and valued at 
$116,673.38. 

The new pumping machinery for the Utah 
mine, on the Comstock, is being made in this 
city. It will equal in capacity and strength, 
any siniilar machinery on the Comstock, 



January 16, 1875,] 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



39 



Fatal Effects of Filth. 

X. A. Willard in a late Address before the 
onneoticnt Farmers' Convention discoursed 
1 follows: — Many cases of fever have been 
iced to the consumption of swill milk; dis- 
uses have been traced to the milk- drawn from 
>wsby the attendants of sick persons; also to 
,e impure water with -which milk-pans were 
ished. Cows that drink impure water give 
lwholesnroe mitk. Milk becomes impure 
om particles of dust falling from the cow's 
Ider, which has been gathered by passing 
rough stoughB or mud-holes. Farmers do 
>t as a rule appreciate this matter, but if they 
dispose of their milk or butter before any 
eat change is effected, they think all respon- 

lili'y is off their shoulders. The fine charae- 
of English cheese may be attributed to great 
je in all the operations, ronning from the 
nditions of the pasture, as to the cleanliness 
om slough- holes, through the stable, the 
iring-house. washing of pans, etc, to the 
oductioo of the cheese. Cesspools or dead 
timuls found upon the premises of English 
toots ar« subjects for prosecution. 
Putrid water is ofttn the only kind by which 
e cow can sluke her thirst, and yet it is pro- 
ictive of disease. We have a law to prevent 

terint* milk, and jet a farmer is allowed to 
irmit his cows to quench their thirst in the 
ost filthy and poisonous water. Which is the 
ost deserving of punishment? A case of 
arrhea in a family was traced to the milk ob- 
ined from a cow confined in a stable without 
oper ventilation. While the cow is under a 
olent excitement, or in an exceedingly ner- 
»U8 condition, the milk becomes highly poi- 
mous, as many cases have abundontly proved. 
child fed from the milk of a cow that drank 
Dm water oozing out of a hog pen was covered 
rer with soreB and pustules. Every factory 
r milk should have a schedule of questions 
r its patron*, covering the whole ground of 
eanliness, treatment of the animal under all 
nditions, while in the pasture, at the stable, 

in their passage from one to the other; con- 
tion of pasturage as regards grass, etc., and 

every direction affecting the product of 
ilk. 



Qooo H E 4 L TH- 



Deaths from Lamp Explosions. 

There are so many circumstances under 
bich accidents, more or leas severe and often 
tal, occur from lamp explosions, that people 
nnut be too studious in informing themselves 
ith regard to such accidents, or too careful in 
eking to avoid them. But a few days since 
ie following case occurred at the house of a 
iend on Perry street, in this city. A gentle- 
an entered a room late at night in which a 
:rosene lamp had been burning low through 
e evening, stepped towards it and was in the 
;t of extending bis hand to turn it down, and 
it; but just before his fingers reached the 
.umb-screw the lamp exploded with a loud re- 
rt which sent it in fragments to every part of 
e room. Fortunately there was no fire set 
d no person irjjured. The next morning a 
reful examination of the fragments to learn 
e cuise of the explosion led to the theory 
at the tube, which was rather a large one, 
id been fitted with a very small wick, thus 
aving a birge air space by means of which, 
. all probability, the movement of the air in 
ie room, caused by the opening of the door, 
reed the small, flickering flame down into the 
,be far enough to communicate with and ex- 
lode the gas which would naturally, under the 
rcume-tances, have accumulated therein. 
In this connection it may be interesting, as 
ell as useful, to call to mind the fact that 
rof. Chandler, of New York city, says: "The 
>tal result for the year 1869, for the city of 
ew York, which I myself have cut from news- 
apera, is fifty-two latal accidents from dan- 
erous kerosene, fifty severe and six slight — in 
11 one hundred and eight per-ons, to my 
nowledge, from my own reading, have been 
ijured by kerosene in one year." 

Effect of Waemth in Preventing Death 
bom Chloral. — Dr. Brunton (who, by the 
ay, has sueceeded the lamented Anstie as 
rtitor of that excellent medical journal, The 
*ractiUoner) confirms the observations of Lie- 
reich and others, and finds that the snbeuta- 
eons injection of a solution of chloral induces 
leep, which is light and easily broken if the 
ose be small, but passes into coma if the dose 
large. In dogs, considerable restlessness 
as observed before sleep came on, and the 
spiration was at first rendered rapid but sub- 
iquently became slow. A remarkable dimi- 
ution of temperature was observed, which 
ppears to be partly due to greater loss from 
he surface, caused" by the vessels of the skin 
ecoming much dilated under the influence 
f the drug, and allowing the blood to be 
ooled more readily by a low external temper- 
ture. It is partly due also to the diminished 
>roduction of heat, which cessation of muscu- 
lar action always induces. Dr. Brunton found' 
hat an animal wrapped in cotton-wool may 
ecover perfectly from a dose of chloral which 
3 sufficient to kill it when exposed to the cool- 
Dg action of the air, and that recovery from 
he narcotic action is much quicker when the 
emperature is maintained in this way, and still 
aore rapid when the animal is placed in a warm 
>ath, providing this is not excessive. The 



bearing of these experiments on the treatment 
of persons suffering from an overdose of chloral 
is obvious. The patient should be put to bed, 
and the temperature of the body maintained by 
warm blankets and hot- water bottles applied to 
various parts of the body, especially the cardiac 
region. Warmth over the heart is an excellent 
stimulant to the circulation, which, like the 
respiration, iH enfeebled by chloral. If respi- 
ration threatens to fail, it should be maintained 
artificially so as to allow time for the chloral to 
be excreted and the normal functions to be 
restored. 

Colic in Young Children. — Put a lump of 
assafetida, about as large as a hazel nut in a 
three ounce vial, one teaspoonful of magnesia, 
and two or three teaspoonfuls of whisky, to 
preserve it; then fill up the vial with soft 
water. About the time the child begins 
to cry with the colic give of the mixture from 
half to a teaspoonful, according to age, diluted 
in water and well sweetened with white or lump 
sugar. One dose is generally sufficient to re- 
lieve the little sufferer; but if necessary, repeat 
after a time. It may be unpleasant at first, 
but the patient will soon learn to like it. This 
acts on the bowels sufficient to keep them reg- 
ular. Cordials and soothing syrups are usually 
astringent — just what a child does not want. 

Eat but three times a day, at regularjperiods, 
and see that at least a five hours* interval oc- 
curs between each two meals. 



Black-Leading Iron. 

In these days of general diffusion of chem- 
ical knowledge it is scarcely necessary to state 
that the " black lead " or "plumbago" of com- 
merce, is not lead at all, or any compound of 
its composition. Neither is it a carburet of 
lead, and that it includes no lead whatever in 
iron, as is sometimes stated. It is simply car- 
bon. Pure plumbago is pure carbon, impure 
plumbago is impure carbon. Its proper name 
is graphite, that is, writing stone. We may 
venture to describ-- it as the softest of all true 
solids, and have often pondered wonderin^ly 
upon the apparently unnoticed, but very curi- 
ous chemico-mechauical paradox that the hard- 
est and softest of all the solids existing upon 
the earth are, chemically speaking, the same 
substance, gTaphite and the diamond being 
both carbon. 

It is this wonderful softness, combined with 
persistent solidity, that enables us to smear it 
over any other solid surface, and thus obtain a 
solid paint, all body and no medium. For the 
class of castings to which it is commonly ap- 
plied where its application can be readily re- 
peated and where it is not exposed to the direct 
action of water it is unrivalled as a protecting 
film for iron. Its chemical action, so far as it 
does act when cold, is reducing, or anti-oxid- 
izing. It-* color and toueare so similar to iron 
that Mr. Ruskin himself could scarcely make 
any asthetic objection to its use, and the film is 
so marvelously thin that it obliterates nothing. 
There does not apper to have ever been any at- 
tempt to estimate the thickness of a well 
brushed film of graphite, but it would seem 
that if a hundred strata of such films could be 
piled in contact with each other, their com- 
bined thickness would fall short of that of the 
thinnest gold leaf. 

Cheap Telegraphy.— ^President Orton's re- 
port of the affairs of the Western Union Tele- 
graph company is calculated to inspire much 
hope in those who believe that the Govern- 
ment can run the lines at cheaper rates to the 
public. On the first of January, 1873, a reduc- 
tion of more than 50 per cent, was made in the 
maximum tariff between the most remote 
points ou the company's line. This, though 
occasioning a temporary loss of revenue, has 
resulted, during the last few months, in a large 
increase. The reduction was from $7.50 and 
$5 to §>2.50. President Orton now adds that, 
owing to Messrs. Edison's and Prescott'squad- 
rupl ex apparatus, which is, at the present time, 
working successfully between Chicago and New 
York, and by which two messages are sent in 
the same direction and two more in the oppo- 
site direction simultaneously on a single wire, 
he believes it practicable before long to cut 
rates down still lower, and ultimately fr> estab- 
lish but four rates for day messages, namely, 
twenty-five, fifty, seventy-five cents, and one 
dollar, with half charges (except for the low- 
est; for night messages. 

To Remove Nitric Acid Spots. — The yellow 
spots produced by nitric acid may be removed 
from brown or black woolen goods, while fresh, 
by repeatedly dipping them into a concentrated 
solution of permangate of potassa and then 
washing them with water. The yellow spots 
on the hands may be removed in the same way, 
the brown stain produced by the permangate 
being removed by an aqueous solution of sul- 
phurous acid. 

The United States is now paying over $100,- 
000,000 per annum for freight and passage on 
foreign ships, to be carried abroad and expend- 
ed in the employment and support of other 
peoples beyond a fair percentage of what 
should go to foreign vessels, estimating on the 
tonnage and travel of each respectively. 

Geeen wood can be easily finished by scorch- 
ing the piece after it is shaped out, A few 
lighted shavings will suffice. 




Guns Discharged Without Caps. 

It seems almost impossible that a gun should 
be discharged without the presence of either 
cap or flint; yet a well authenticated case of 
the kind seems to have ocenrred, recently, near 
Napa, as narrated by the Register of that place. 
It seems that Benjamin Bergrin, being out with 
some companions duck shooting, had just fired 
one barrel, and hearing the shot loose in the 
other, turned up the gun into his left hand to 
pour out the charge, taking the precaution to 
first remove the cap, Notwithstanding the ab- 
sence of the cap, the gun went off and madn a 
bad wound in his left hand. It seems almost 
incredible that a gun could be discharged after 
the cap is removed, but the phenomena is ac- 
counted for by experts on the hypothesis that 
the percusKive quality of the' cap had— the 
weather being damp — adhered to the nipple of 
the gun and been sufficient to explode it on 
being jarred incident to shaking th" charge out, 
the hammer being down. That this theory is 
a correct one, is confirmed by a wimilfu* acci- 
dent which occurred a few days previous to 
one of the Asylum apprentices, who had been 
shooting, and having both charges left in his 
gun, thought to save them by leaving them in 
till next day, when he would go out again. To 
this end he removed both caps, let one hammer 
down carefully, and was lowering the other, 
when it slipped from his thumb on to the nip- 
ple, and discharged the barrel. The other bar- 
rel went off at the same instant, as is supposed, 
by the shock of the first one — both discharging 
their contents up through the roof. The youth 
had a narrow escape, and the two accidents 
confirm the theory of the total depravity of 
guns, "dangerous without either lock, stock or 
barrel, because a man once whipped his wife 
to death with a ramrod." 



Insect Anatomy. — Dr. R. U. Pepcr, the 
naturalist, in giving an account of some micro- 
scopic investigations, in which he has recently 
been engaged, says: I have managed to make 
a very careful dissection of the tongue of a 
house fly, and now I can show the so-called 
trachae on the tip of the tongue very neatly 
dissected by my own hand. I can also show a 
very fine specimen of a parasite from a blowing 
fly, with all its organs perfect. I have noticed 
what I think is a fact that the flies which survive 
the winter are all, or nearly all, perhaps females; 
and have just dissected a house-fly, in which I 
find 106 eggs. I have also demonstrated what 
is, perhaps, an ontological discovery— that the 
central lancet of the horse-fly is tubular. For 
what reason, as he has a sucker from which he 
draws blood from the wound he makes? The 
lancet of the horse-fly — the female, for the male 
has no biting organs, is a compound instrument. 
"When closed it presents a point; when open it 
shows several points radiating from its base. 
The two outside lancets have rows of teeth, 
like those on the jaw of a ehark. I suppose the 
creature introduces the lancet shut, like the 
sticks of a fan. "When it is withdrawn it is 
opened in the process, and thus makes that 
ugly tormenting wound which the,se insects 
inflict upon horses and cattle. The hollow 
lancet perhaps carries some kind of fluid to 
poison the blood or render it more fluid. There 
is, however, no gland to be found by which 
this fluid is secreted. That the lancet is hollow, 
however, I have shown without a question, as I 
have contrived to make fluid pass through^it. 

Gcm Arabic. — This useful product come 
from Morocco, instead of Arabia, as its name 
would imply. About the middle of November, 
that is, after the rainy season, a gummy juice 
exudes spontaneously from the trunk and 
branches of a species of the acacia in that 
country. It gradually thickens in the furrow 
down which it runs, and assumes the form of 
oval and round drops, about the size of pigeons' 
eggs, of different colors, as it comes from the 
red or white gum tree. About the middle of 
December the Moors encamp on the borders of 
the forest, and the harvest lasts a full month. 
The gum is packed in large leather saoks, and 
transported on the backs of camels and bul- 
locks to the seaports for shipement. The har- 
vest occasion is made one of great rejoicing, 
and the people for the time being almost live 
on gum, which is nutritious and fattening. 
Such is the commercial story of this simple ar- 
ticle. 



How to Use a Grindstone. — Common grind- 
stone spindles, with a crank at one end, are 
open to ihe great objection that the stone will 
never keep round, because every person is in- 
clined, more or less, to follow the motion of 
his foot with his hand, which causes the pres- 
sure on the same to be unequal. The harder 
pressure is always applied to the very same 
part of the stone, and will soon make it un- 
even, so that it is impossible to grind a tool 
true. To avoid this, put in place of the crank 
a small cog-wheel of 13 cogs, to work into the 
former. The stono will make about .07 of a 
revolution more than the crank, and the harder 
pressure of the tool on the stone will change to 
another place at every turn, and the stone will 
keep perfectly round if it is a good one. This 
is a very simple contrivance, but it will be new 
to many of our readers. — Cabinet Maker. 

Gleaning Out-Door Statuary, Etc.— It is 
recommended, in cleaning moss-covered stat- 
uary in gardens, etc., first to kill the vegetation 
by the application of petroleum or benzine, 
which will not injure the stone, and to remove 
it when dry by brushing, finally rubbing with 
a rag. 



DopiEsjic EcofiopY* 



Care of Glass and China. 

It ought to be taken for granted that all china 
and glass-ware is well tempered; yet a little 
careiul attention may not be mispbiced, even 
ou that point; for though ornamental china or 
glass-ware is not exposed to the action of hot 
water in common domestic use, yet it maybe 
iujudioiously immersed in it for the purpose of 
cleaning; and an articles intended solely for or- 
nament may not be so highly annealed as oth- 
er*, without fraudulent negligence on the part 
of fhe manufacturers it will be proper never to 
apply water to when beyond a tepid tempera- 
ture. But when fractures take place, the best 
cement, both for strength and invisibility, is 
that made from mastic. The process, indeed, 
may be thought tedious; but a sufficient quan- 
tity can be made at once to last a life-time. To 
an ounce of mastic add as much highly recti- 
fied spirits of wine as will dissolve it. Soak an 
ounce of isinglass in water until quite soft; 
then dissolve it in pure rum or brandy until it 
forms a strong glue, to which add about a quar- 
ter of an ounce of gum ammoniac, welled rub- 
bed and mixed. Put the the two mixtures to- 
gether in an earthen vessel over a gentle heat; 
when well united the mixture mav be put into 
a phial and kept well stopped. When wanted 
for use the bottle must be set in warm water 
and the articles to be mended must also be 
warmed before the cement is applied. The 
broken surfaces when carefully joined should 
be kept in close contact for at least twelve hours, 
after which the fracture will be scarcely percep- 
tible and the adhesion perfect. The broken 
portion will also be as strong as the unbroken. 
The same cement may be applied to marble and 
even to metals. — English Exchange. 



Poisoned Butchers' Meat. — It 'is well 
that all housekeepers, and especially all en- 
gaged in furnishing meat for the table should 
be impressed with the undoubted fact that ani- 
mals ought not to become excited before they 
are bntchered, because their flesh is injured 
thereby, and it will spoil quickly. It is fre- 
quently the case that some mishap occurs 
when a hog or a fat steer is to be butchered, or 
when a hurt is given of great or less a moment 
which puts the animal in deadly fear," and he 
is likely to break away; in which case men, 
boys, and dogs give chase, which makes mat- 
ters decidedly worse, and if, finally, life is 
taken, it is under pitiable circumstances. 
There is no doubt that much of the butchers' 
meat of the large cities is injured by reason of 
long journeys, inducing a condition of fear and 
trembling or a high state of nervous excitement 
which can but affect the flesh. There ought to 
be special regulations to guard against this in 
all slaughter-houses, and ou farms the utmost 
care and deliberation should be taken so that 
butchering may be quickly and successfully 
performed. — Dr. Cross. 



Rolled Herring. — Herrings having haid 
roes appear larger and finer fish than those with 
soft roes; nevertheless the latter are to be pre- 
ferred, as they really have more flesh and are 
more delicate. Having scraped the fish, cut off 
the heads, split open, cleanse and take out the 
roes. Take the herring in the left hand, and with 
the thumb and finger of the right press the 
back bone to loosen it, then lay the fish flat on 
the board and draw out the bone; it will come 
out whole, leaving none behind. Sprinkle the 
herring with pepper, salt and a little chopped 
green parsley; lay on the soft roe, roll up 
tightly, leaving the fin and tail outwards, and 
bind round with a piece of tape to keep it in 
shape. Have ready some water well seasoned 
with pepper, salt and vinegar, and when it 
boils'put in the herring and let it simmer for 
ten minutes, or until cooked. Serve it with 
butter, parsley or egg sauce poured over. 



Artificial Cheese. — As a successor to arti- 
ficial butter we have now an article of artificial 
cheese. The experiment of its manufacture 
has been made in Tompkins county, New York, 
it is said with great success; and the theoryis 
simply that skim milk cheese, a food material 
of little value, may be so improved by the ad- 
dition of foreign enriching material as to be 
much more valuable. The cream is therefore 
taken from milk and made into butter, and the 
skimmed material is made into cheese by the 
addition of a pure and wholesome, but cheap 
oil. 



Fried Vegetable Marrow. — Cut the marrow 
in strips an inch and a half long and three- 
eighths of an inch square; sprinkle freely with 
fine salt, and place the strips under an inverted 
plate in a basin. In a couple of hours put 
them in a cloth, and thoroughly dry them by 
wringing them in the cloth; then flour them in 
the same manner as whitebait, and throw them 
into plenty of boiling lard. As soon as they 
begin to take color drain thoroughly, sprinkle 
with salt and serve hot. 



Oyster Omelet. — Whisk four eggs to a thick 
broth; then add by degrees one gill of cream; 
beat them well together; season the eggs with 
pepper and salt to taste. Have ready one dozen 
fine oysters, cut them in half, pour the egg 
into a pan of hot butter, and drop the oysters 
over it as early as possible. Fry a light brown 
and serve hot. 



40 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



[January 16, 1875 




W. B. EWER Senior Editoe. 



OEWEY «fc CO. 

, T. DEWEY, 



X»-iibllslxers. 

GEO. H. BTRONG 
JNO. Ij. BOONE 



Office, No. 224 Sansome St., S. 
of California St., San Francisco. 



Subscription and Advertising- Rates. 

BuBsaraPTiONB payable in advance— For one year $4; 

Sii months, $2.25; three monthB, $1.26, Remittances 

by registered letters or P. O. orders at onr rlafe 

Advertising Rates.— 1 week. 1 month. 3 monOis. 1 year. 

Per line 25 .80 $3.00 $5.00 

One-half inch $1.00 3.00 7.60 24.00 

One inch 1-60 4-00 12.00 40.00 

Stan Francisco: 
Saturday Morning, Jan. 16, 1875. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



EDITORIALS AND (JBNBRAL NEWS.— 
Hydraulic Mining in California; The LadieB' Friend; 
An Improved Harrow; The Colusa Quicksilver Mines; 
The New Mint Engine, 33- Big Capitals— Small 
Profits; Eastern Mining Excitements, 40. North 
Pacific Coast Railroads; The Carolina Parrot; Quick- 
silver Mining in Mexico, 41- Grain Elevators; Pat- 
ents and Inventions; The Black Hills; The Bribery 
Investigation; The New Currency Bill, and other 
Items of News. 44- 

ILLUSTRATIONS.— Improved Lap Board; Dia- 
gram taken from Engine at the New Mint; Dononue's 
Improved Harrow, 33. Carolina Parrot, 41. 

CORRESPONDENCE. — Among the Quicksilver 
Mines, 34. 

MEC HANIC AL PROGRESS. — Improvements 
in Glass Manufacture; Single Rail Steam Towage on 
the Belgium Canal; India-Rubber Tires; Improved 
Stucco; Relative Cost of Water and Steam Powers; A 
New "Wonder in Steam; A New Paper BoaTd; Immense 
Photographs; Paper Manufacture, 35- 

SCIENTIFIC PROGRESS.— A New Bleaching 
Material; Phenomenon in Iron Drawing; Scientific 
Discoveries in Cyprus; Improved Ohromo-Litho- 
graphic Process; Electro-Magnets for Blasting; Elec- 
tricity and Muscular Action: Sunspot and Ozone; 
The Great Telescope; New Discoveries in the Mam- 
moth Cave; Science Proving its TTruits; Irregularity 
in the Earth's Rotation; Spontaneous Combustion, 
35. 

MINING STOCK MARKET.— Thursday's Sales 
at the San Francisco Stock Board; Notices of Assess- 
ments; Meetings and Dividends; Review of Stock 
Market for the Week, 36. 

MINING SUMMARY— From various counties in 
California and Nevada, 37- 

GOOD HEALTH. -Fatal Effects of Filth; Deaths 
from Lamp Explosions; Effect of Warmth in Prevent- 
ing Death from Ohloral; Colic in Young Children, 

39. 

USEFUL INFORMATION.— Black-Leading Iron; 
Cheap Telegraphy; To RemoveNitrio Acid Spots; Guns 
Discharged Without Caps; Insect Anatomy; Gum 
Arabic; H -w to Use a Grindstone; Cleaning Out-Door 
Statuary, Etc., 39. 

DOMESTIC ECONOMY. — Care of Glass and 
China; Poisoned Butchers' Meat; Rolled Herring; 
Artificial Cheese; Fried Vegetable Marrow; Oyster 
Omelette, 39. 

MISCELLANEOUS.— The Sumner Mine; All Alive 
to the Northward : The Sheep Ranch Mine; Coal Slate; 
Ward and Julia; The New Standard; Mining De- 
cision; New Locations; Good for the "C and C;!' 
Foundrymen Exempt from License; Ore Shipped, 34- 
Panamint— What "The Company" is Doing; The Big 
Bonanza; Eureka Bullion; Peavine; Bee-Hunting; 
New Ditch 38- San Francisco Microscopical Soci- 
ety; The Emma Mining Bubble; Mining Operations 
in Calaveras County; Quicksilver Production of Co- 
luBa County; Encouraging, 42- Steel Shoes and 
Dies, 44- 



Tule Bottle Cover. 



Earl K. Oooley, of this city, has recently se- 
cured a patent through the Mining and Scien- 
tific; Pbess Patent Agency, for a machine for 
making bottle covers out of tule grass. The 
machine consists of an endleBS belt, feeding to 
a clamp a series of lengths of the stalks of the 
tule grass or other rush, the clamp seizing and 
holding them until a series of needles with 
threads, carried upon a sliding frame, puncture 
them and string them, the thread remaining 
through the stalks as they are withdrawn. It 
also consists in hooked claws, operating inter- 
mittently and conjointly with the needles to 
serge the thread and prevent it from being 
withdrawn by the needles, and in a reciprocat- 
ing knife operated by the movement of the 
sliding frame, to cut the threads in proper 
lengths as the needles recede. The invention 
and letters patent have been purchased by Ira 
S. Warring, of this oity, to whom all commu- 
nications can be addressed. 



Pocket Map of the Comstock. — "We * re- 
ceived this week a pooket map of the Comstock 
lode, showing the latest changeB up to Jan. 1st, 
1875. It was compiled and drawn by Edward 
B. Lasalle, Topographical Engineer, room 19, 
Montgomery block. It is on a scale of 1200 
feet to the inch. This little map was one 
much needed, and that it supplied a demand 
was proved by the sale of over 500 copies in 
the first three days. The map shows some 18 
or 20 more looations than the other maps of 
the same region. A list of Washoe stocks 
in the Stock Boards is given, with the number 
of feet and shares. The map is a very con- 
venient one, neatly prepared and bound, and, 
as far as we can see, seems to be correct. It is 
much cheaper than the large roller maps 
and answers every purpose as a means of 
reference. 



Big Capitals— Small Profits. 

Most of the new mining companies recently 
organized, have been incorporated with capital 
stock varying from five to fifteen million dol- 
lars. Ten millions seems to be the favorite of 
late, and few promoters think of putting any- 
thing before the public at a less amount. 
Moreover, the mania to increase the capital 
stock of companies which have been long in 
existence, prevails to a greater extent than ever 
before. These companies increase their capitals 
from one and two million dollars in ten and 
twenty thousand shares, to five and ten millions 
divided into from one hundred to five hundred 
thousand shares. Where all this business will 
end can not be seen, as there is practically no 
limit to the amount the oapital stock may be 
increased on paper. But unfortunately the 
shares bear a proportion to the capital stock of 
course, and how numbers of mines which have 
never paid a dividend on thirty and forty thou- 
sand shares can ever pay a respectable one on 
a hundred or two hundred thousand shares we 
do not see. 

It may be all very well to divide up such 
mines as the California, Consolidated "Virginia, 
etc., which are supposed to contain countless 
millions, and the shares of which are held at 
such enormous prices in consequence; but there 
is very little real benefit in doing the same 
thing with dozens of other mines, which are 
only kept running by the expectation of striking 
ore. 

Taking the Comstock mines for instance, 
which are listed on the Board : Best & 
Belcher, with 542 feet in the mine is divided 
into 100,800 shares; Belcher, with 1,040 feet, 
has 104,000 shares; Bullion, with 943 feet, 
has 100,000 shares; California, with GOO feet, 
has 108,000 shares; Cosmopolitan, with 1,000 
feet, has 100,000; Cons. Virginia, with 710 
feet, has 108,000; Crown Point, with 600 feet, 
has 100,000; Dayton/ with 1,600 feet, has 
100,000; Imperial, with only 180 feet, has 
100,000; Kossuth, with 2,800 feet, has 108,000; 
Leviathan, with 2,000 feet, has 100,000; Mexi- 
can, with 600 feet, has 100,800; Ophir, with 
675 feet, has 100,800; Silver Central Cons., with 
1500 feet, has 110,000; Sierra Nevada, with 
2,640 feet, has 100,000; Whitman, with 1,800 
feet, has 100,000 shares. These are the princi- 
pal ones called on the Board which have more 
than 50,000 or 60,000 shares. It will of course 
be noticed that the size of the mine bears no 
proportion to the number of shares, and that 
the number of shares is not in proportion to the 
value of the mine. 

When we come to thiuk, however, of mines 
with a capital stock of $54,000,000 divided into 
540,000 shares, as will be the case with the Cal- 
ifornia and Consolidated "Virginia in a few 
weeks, it is pretty hard to base any calculations 
about the real value of a share, even if the 
ground were all pure silver. California, with 
600 feet will have a capital stock of $54,000,000 
divided into 540,000 shares. This is 900 shares 
to a foot, making each share cover a space of 
ground one seventy-fifth of an inch in thick- 
ness. Thus, a man owning one share owns 
one seventy-fifth of an inch of the mine, and he 
would have to own 75 shares to own an inch 
out of 600 feet. With. paper of ordinary thick- 
ness and each share on a separate certificate, if 
he set his 75 shares up on edge it would cover 
all he owned. If these shares sell at only $5 
or $10 each, the mine will have to be nearly 
pure silver to pay any respectable dividend on 
the capital stock for a year. In Consolidated 
Virginia the buyer will own a little more ground 
in proportion to the share. It will have the 
same number of shares, and with 710 feet, will 
have about 760 shares to the foot, so that each 
share will represent an ownership of about one 
sixty-third of an inch in the whole mine. 

This is running things pretty close, even for 
mining ventures; but the examples of these 
large mines with their immense bonanzas is not 
one to be followed by ordinary companies. The 
much maligned Emma and several other Amer- 
ican mines owned in England, would have paid 
a fair profit on a reasonable capital; but when 
people expect miues to pay what investors ex- 
pect at least — three per cent, per month — on 
capitals of from 10,000,000 to 50,000,000, they 
are unreasonable. The two mines mentioned 
may be exceptions; and if half what is said is 
true, probably will prove so; but this is no 
argument in favor of putting every new mine 
in the market with a capital stock of such enor- 
mous figures that not' even the most sanguine 
buyers expect a fair dividend on the amount, 
but trust to owning a large number of shares. 
Times of excitement like the present are just 
the occasion of these moves, which of course 
every one knows are only intended as Btock- 
jobbing operations. "Giving poor men a 
chance" is, however, too thin an excuse to be 
swallowed by everybody. 



Eastern Mining Excitements. 



An asbestos deposit is being worked on the line 
of the Amador canal, about ten miles above 
Jackson. 



The miners about Ukiah, Mendocino county, 
have organized the Ukiah mining district, 
electing S. Wurtenburg Recorder. The United 
States general mining laws were adopted. The 
district starts from Sanel district -on the south 
and inns up the neighborhood of Little Lake. 



W. Fkank Stewart has located a valuable 
claim on Mount Davidson, nine miles from 
Virginia City. 



What queer ideas they have -about mining 
for gold and silver in the Eastern States. Their 
heads are very level on coal and iron, but when 
they find, or think they find, precious metals, 
they immediately become demented. They 
hunt up an "old, experienced California miner" 
who perhaps lived here, or worked in a mining 
town, and knew nothing of mining, to tell them 
all about it. If he has been in California, it is 
enough for them, and his predictions are im- 
plicitly believed. Now, not one man in 500 in 
this State knows anything about practical min- 
ing whatever; and nine-tenths of those who 
have worked in the mines here would not be 
competent to take charge of one. Very few 
men are good managers, and still fewer are the 
experts whose judgment as to the future of a 
mine maybe relied- on. Still these Eastern 
people believe anything the "California miner'* 
tells them, especially if it is favorable. 

The latest excitement we have heard of is the 
discovery of "six miles of silver," at New- 
buryport, Mass. A man named Rogers found 
some metal, thought it was valuable, and then 
studied geology and. mineralogy to find out 
what it was. He kept his secret until he bought 
the land, in company with a rich farmer, pay- 
ing $350 for it. He found float and at six feet 
struck the "true vein." The Boston Advertiser 
contains a long account of the matter, which 
for ignorance of mining is rich, but we have 
only room for a few extracts: 

The pieces taken from the pit, as dug by Mr. 
Adams, exhibited vein structure, the upper five 
inches being composed of galena, while th? 
under three inches — the three inches next the 
supposed foot-wall — contained considerable 
gray copper ore or tetrahedrite, galena, quartz, 
copper and iron pyrites. Four srjecimens were 
assayed. The first, coarse-grained galena, as- 
sayed for silver, yielded $56.37; and the second, 
fine grained galena, $75.23 per ton; the third, 
a comparatively pure piece of gray copper, 
containing also some quartz and galena, as- 
sayed for silver, copper and incidentally for 
gold, yielded, of silver, £1,270 per ton; gold, 
$129 per ton ; and about 27 per cent, of copper. 
The fourth specimen, weighing about three 
pounds, tried for lead, was found to be nearly 
pure, and hammered quite readily. The lead 
was 52 per cent, of the whole matter. The 
mine has been bonded for $100,000. 

The Advertiser then goes on to state that sys- 
tematic mining operations were commenced by 
sinking a shaft ten feet square. "As the shaft 
increased in depth the vein, which is what is 
known as a fissure vein — that is, metalbetween 
two walls of granite, where, in all probability 
it was thrown by volcanic action— the vein 
broadened from three feet at the surface to 
seven feet at present working — twenty-five feet 
down. As the men descend the vein grows 
richer and purer, the proportion of silver and 
gold increasing, while that of the lead remains 
about the same. The south wall has not yet 
been reached. The men are therefore working 
on the pure metal, the north wall being per- 
fectly perpendicular. In consequence of this 
fact, which is totally without a parallel in min- 
ing history, there is but the smallest possible 
expense incurred in removiug the ore — about 
$1 per ton. About ten ions are taken out, 
being hoisted up in baskets every twenty-four 
hours. To work this quantity only four men 
are required by day, and a relieving gang of 
equal number by night. This ore, which is 
piled in a storehouse, as at present mined, 
yields $90 per ton of silver, $70 of lead, and 
$11 of gold; a total of $171. The cost of smelt- 
ing and separating is $20 per ton, so the profit 
is $150 per ton. Another shaft has been sunk 
almost as deep as the other, and they have a 
four-foot vein. They have oat 125 tons of ore." 
The Advertiser then gives us some figures, say- 
ing $1,500 per day is pretty good profit, this what 
they expect; "and this from a single shaft 
only 25 feet down, without operating the drifts, 
or lateral veins." Mining experience, how- 
ever, has demonstrated that a fissure vein is 
always without bottom. This vein is estimated 
by geologists to extend in its general direction 
twenty degrees east of north about six or seven 
miles in length. Bearing this fact in mind, 
the wealth to be reasonably expected from this 
"find" can only be estimated by comparison. 
The Comstock lode in Nevada, hitherto sup- 
posed to be the richest silver mine in the 
world, yields only $45 per ton on the average, 
while that at Newburyport yields just double 
that. The Mariposa mines, which were sold a 
few years ago to a company for $10,000,000, 
yielded only $15 per ton of silver. The Bel- 
cher mines, in Colorado, which yield about $40 
per ton, divided $900,000 among the stockhold- 
ers as the profit of work during the month of 
August, 1874. And these mines had not the 
additional profits accruing from the produc- 
tion of lead. A correspondent of the New 
York Tribune describes she whole thing in 
nearly the same language, and that experienced 
Colorado and Nevada miners are going to work 
them in the Spring. 

All this reads like a pretty good joke to us, 
of course, although they are evidently in 
earnest there. It is no exaggeration, whatever, 
to state that, in all probability, there are from 
one to five ledges per day found on this coast 
in different localities, but not more than one in 
fifty amounts to so very much after all. The 



"perpendicular foot wall which is without a 
parallel in mining history," seems to be going 
to help them out with the ore, in some way not 
explained^ We Btrongly suspect moreover that 
the "yield" spoken of is simply assay value, 
and when greehoriw work the ore they will not 
get even the 60 or 70 per cent, which we obtain 
here. Any miner can tell what a difference 
there is in an assay of specimens and average 
yield of ore. A piece of ore from a mine may 
assay $1,000 per ton and perhaps ten tons of 
ore crushed just as it came Ironi the ledge may 
not yield $100 for the whole ten tons. Any one 
who knows anything about mining will admit 
that this often happens. To get at any proper 
figures of such values, a quantity of ore — sev- 
eral tons — should be crushed, sampled by com- 
petent persons, and several assays made. The 
assays being averaged, if the ore then, will 
assay $100 per ton they may be able to get from 
$60 to $80 per ton from it, according to'the 
class of ore. These men have probably taken 
the best specimens for assay and build all their 
calculations on the result. 

The Transcript say b: " The Comstock lode, in . 
Nevada hitherto supposed to be the richest 
silver mine in the world, yields only $45 per 
ton on the average, while that at Newburyport 
yields just double. ' ' There is a nut to crack for 
the Comstockers with their big bonanza. But 
isn't it just a little rough to class the whole 
ledge as yielding $45 per ton and take it for 
granted that there is only one mine. We do 
not know exactly how mauy mines there are on 
the Comstock, but there are 103 of them in the 
list of the stock boards in this city and prob- 
ably several, hundred more locations not listed 
on the boards. Consolidated Virginia and Cal- 
ifornia have recently struck ore some speci- 
mens of which assay as high as $8,000 and 
$15,000 per ton, and is expected to average 
$200 per ton. Mr. Dedeishelmer, the expert, 
estimates that one pillar alone in Consolidated 
Virginia will yield seventy millions, but the 
Newburyport mine is expected to excel this. 

The Ti-anscript putB the Belcher mine in 
Colorado instead of on the Comstoek and adds 
that with $40 rock it paid $900,000 in divi- 
dends in August 1874. Now the Belcher mine 
only paid $312,000 in dividends in August but 
it has paid $3,504,000 in dividends during 
1874, During the June quarter of the year it 
hoisted 47,020 tons of ore which yielded 
$3,599,892, an average of $80 per ton. The 
Transcript thinks that the Belcher had not the 
profit accruing from the additional product of 
lead. We do not know anything they would 
want less in the ore thau a quantity of lead. 
The ore could not be milled and would have to 
be smelted which, when fuel is as high as at 
Virginia, would be very expensive. Our base 
metal mines have not, as a general thing, been 
very profitable ad yet. 

While we cannot blame people ignorant of 
such matters for getting excited over rock 
which assays $171 per ton, it is to be hoped 
that they will take the experience of other 
people before putting any money into "mines" 
of which they know nothing. Few practical 
miners pay much attention to what ore from a 
new ledge is supposed to yield, until they nee 
what it actually yields under the stamps. The 
property at Ne,wburypoi;t is already in litiga- 
tion as the man from whom the land was first 
bought ; ays it was obtained from him by fraud. 
They may find a mine of some value there, but 
that it will "rival the Comstock" is simply 
nonsense. We have perhaps on this coast from 
fifty to a hundred and fifty thousand miniDg 
locations, and some of those on the Comstock 
are ahead of all. A new mine here is a matter 
of little moment and even this week we 
chronicle in different parts of this paper eight 
or ten new discoveries; but until they prove 
themselves paying mines, but little attention is 
paid to them except by tlie owners. We hope 
our Eastern friends will go slow, and not base 
calculations of wealth on the assay of a few 
specimens without taking into consideration 
average yield, cost of mining, working ore, 
etc. 

They have proved one thing however, which 
beats us. They have proved, with a 25 ft shaft, 
that their vein is a true fissure. And they 
have also beaten us in finding ore which yields 
52 per cent, lead, 27 per cent, copper, $1270 in 
silver, $129 in gold, besides the pyrites, etc. 
There must be very little gangue left to hold it 
together. 



The Nevada Transcript learns that the Pitts- 
burgh mine, owned by County Treasurer San- 
ford and Cook Brothers, on Deadman's Flat, 
near Grass Valley, very rich rock has been 
struck. Some of it panned out as high as $80 
to the pan. The prospect is good for the de- 
velopment of a first-class ledge there. Another 
ledge has also been discovered at the same 
place. Some men started in to work a few days 
ago and found a ledge. They took out a lot of 
quartz and had it crushed; it yielded them $7 
per day to the hand. 

The daily yield of ore during the past week 
from the Crown Point mine has been 550 tons, 
Belcher 450 tons, Consolidated Virginia 400 
tons, Ophir 200 tons, Hale & Norcross 100 tons, 
making a total daily product of 1,750 tons of 
ore from the five leading Comstock mines. 

"Rich strikes" are becoming remarkably fre- 
quent in the State. It is not alone gold and 
silver which is being brought to light in untold 
millions, but precious metals and minerals of 
all descriptions. 

Az:l the mining claims in the vicinity of 
North San Juan, Nevada county, have shut 
down for want of water. 



January 16, 1875.] 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



41 



North Pacific Coast Railroad. 

The opening of a new failroad is an impor- 
ant event in almost any country, but in Cali- 
fornia, where we have as yet bo few roads in 
)peration, it is even more important than in 
noat of the other States of the Union. The 
3tate is so large, and oar watercourses and 
ivera so few that railroads are more of a neces- 
dty with ns than else where; and as the interior 
s being rapidly settled up, railroads are being 
projected and built more rapidly thau most 
jeople suppose. The North Pacific Coast rail- 
road, our principal narrow gauge road, was for- 
nally opened on the 7th instant, being finished 
is far as Toiuales, Marin county, 52 miles from 
Saucelito. This company was incorporated in 
1871, with a capital stock of $1,500,000 which 
vas afterwards increased to $3,000,000. Being 
i narrow gauge road the oost was very much 
MS than would have been the case with a track 
»f the ordinary width. From Saucelito to 
tomales the distance is 52 miles, including a 
)»nch track into San Rafael. The route 
elected is as follows: Starting from deep water 
A Saucelito, where the company have con. 
ttructed a large and commodious wharf, and 
lave located their machine shops and round 
muses, it skirts for two miles the shore of 
itichaidson's bay, thence crossing an arm of 
he same by means of a substantial bridge 4,000 
eet in length, now nearly completed. It passes 
hrough Marin county via, the town of San 
iafael, its county seat, to the head of Tomales 
»y; thence skirting the shore of that bay to 
he town of Tomales; thence passing from 
darin to Sonoma county, and via. the towns of 
falley Ford and Freestone, to the 'Russian 
iver, along the south bunk of which the road 
s located, to the point of crossing, about four 
niles from its mouth. From this point it fol- 
ows near the coast of the ocean to the mouth 
>f the Walhalla river, a total distance of 115 
milts, the point of oossing the Russian river 
77 miles from Saucelito and 85 miles from 
tan Francisco, and is the terminus of the first 
tivision. 

The rails of the track are 3 feet apart, and 
he iron weighs 35 pounds to the yard. Very 
lerious engineering difficulties were encoun- 
tered, but these were overcome very success- 
ally, at a moderate cost, with easy grades. The 
righest grade coming from Tomales to San 
?rancisco, which is in the direction of the larg- 
tst traffic, is 80 feet to the mile; and in the op- 
)Osite direction the highest grade is 120 feet to 
he mile. Construction was begun iu 1872, and 
lp to the present time $1,500,000 has been 
apended. This includes the purchase of the 
3nn Quentin ferry steamer, the "Clinton'i.and 
he "Contra Costa," and an expenditure of 
B70, 000 on the line beyond Tomales. Ona of 
.he most formidable difficulties was the bridg- 
ing of Richardson's bay. This structure is 
4,000 feet long. So far there are three tunnels. 
One of these at White's hill is 1250 feet long; 
another, on this side of White's hill is 200 feet 
long; and the third near Tomales is 130 feet 
long. A barge has been built that will convey 
18 cars from Saacelito to San Francisco, the 
real terminus of the road. The present equip- 
ment for traffic is six passenger and two baggage 
oars, very neatly constructed by the Kimball 
Carriage Company; four locomotives built at 
Philadelphia by Baldwin & Furley, and seventy- 
five freight cars with 50 more in course of con- 
struction. 

The country through which this road passes 
is a fine one. Most of it is farming and dairy- 
ing land, until the road reaches Russian river, 
where it gets into a timber country. The dairy 
produce from the Point Reyes and Olema sec- 
tions can all be brought by this road, and the 
dairying and farming interests of Tomales, 
Freestone, Bloomfield and Bodega, will be great- 
ly benefitted. The harbors up the coast are few 
and unsafe, and it has been difficult to stop at 
all times at Tomales. As a consequence farm- 
ers about Blooomfield, and that vicinity, have 
hauled their grain, potatoes, etc., to Petaluma, 
which is 16 miles from Bloomfield, in prefer- 
ence to hauling to Tomales and sending by sea 
to this city. All through the section traversed 
by this railroad they have been waiting 
patiently for years for a railroad, and the farm- 
ers are now naturally jubilant over its partial 
completion. 

It is expected that the road will pay a gross 
income of "at least $400,000 a year after the first 
12 months, and in 1876 they expect a net earn- 
ing of $200,000, as a profit on the first division 
of the road, which will have cost $1,700,000. 
The culverts and bridges on the road are of a 
very substantial character, and the piling in 
Richardson's and earthworks at Tomales bay 
have been done in first-rate order. The 
ourves on the road are laid out in from 8 to 17 
degrees, although there is one curve of 20 
degrees. In the course of next summer some 
changes will be made which will reduce a few 
of the curves and shorten the road slightly. 
The highest embankment on the road is 70 feet 
high, and the deepest cut about 40 feet. The 
depots at stations have not yet been built, but 
will be during the summer. After the road 
reaches Russian river it follows it to the coast 
1 and thence runs up the edge of the redwoods 



of North Sonoma county to Mendocino connty. 
This is the ultimate destination of the road, 
unless they see their way by that time to stretch 
out for the northern counties. This summer 
they will only attempt to reach Russian river, 
and will be satisfied if they carry out their ex- 
pectations of getting to KnowleBville by Octo- 
ber. 

Howard Schuyler's estimate, as Rtated in the 
Post, of entire cost of the line to Knowlesville, 
77 miles, including full equipment, was $1,848, - 
600. The actual cost of the road to Tomales, 
51 miles, making with the Sau Rafael branch 53 
miles, and the present equipment, is less than 
$1,400,000, the other $100,000 haying been 
more than expended on earth work beyond To- 
males, and the purchase of the San Quentin 
ferry and steamers, which were not included in 
his estimate. This is just $26,415 a mile, or 
say, when the depots are erected and ballasting 
finished, $27,000. Compared with the oost of 
other roads in the State, which had no such en- 



Quicksilver Mining in Mexico. 

We have received, through the kindness of 
the Mexiivu Consul in this city, the following 
items relative to quicksilver mining in Mexico 
from Antonio del Castillo, sub-director of the 
School of Mines in Mexico. 

Since the epoch of scarcity of quicksilver, 
preceding the discovery of Guadalcazar and 
New Almaden in 1840 and 1845 respectively, 
this article had not reached its present price 
of $200 per quintal in Mexico. Suspension of 
mauy mills throughout the country is the na- 
tural consequence. New and old deposits of 
mercury are, however, being brought into 
notice. Near San Felipe, State of Guanajuato 
various deposits are being worked, whose 

yield, however, oannot supply the demand 
from the State. Near Guadalcazar, and 
Charcos, State of San Luis Potosi, some veins 

are yielding quicksilver, though not enough 




CAROLINA PARROT. 



gineering difficulties to contend with, this is a 
most favorable showing. 

Though no experiment, this is a sort of test 
road, and if the average freight and traffic 
reaches $8,000, or even $5,000 a mile per year, 
it will settle the future gauge of all our local 
lines. There are in this State hundreds of val- 
leys which will furnish $5,000 a mile receipts 
per annum. And in none of these could a 
costly broad gauge be made to pay even five 
per cent, interest per annum at any reasonable 
tariff of charges. 



Tee Stock Exchange has elected the follow- 
ing officers for the ensuing year: James R. 
Keene, President; Coll Dean, Vice President; 
B. Howard Coit, Chairman; Henry Schmieden, 
Treasurer; Franklin Lawton, Secretary; and 
Thomas M. Blair, Sergeant-at-Arms. 

J. P. Fsiendlet has tendered the Willamette 
Valley and Coast railway a gift of ten acres of 
ten acres of land adjoining Corvallis for the 
use of the road as grounds for machine shops, 
turn table, depot, etc. 

The Salt Lake Herald thinks San Francisco 
and Virginia should erect a mounment of silver 
to Comstock, the discoverer of the Washoe 
mines. 

The Sutro tunnel is in 8,079 feet. 



for the same State. In Zacatecas where there 
exists great demand for quicksilver, one vein 
has been discovered near Sainetro, though not 
indicating great riohness. 

In Durango there are extensive deposits 
which have been abandoned for upwards of 
two years, on account of the company's em- 
barrassment and political difficulties. Some 
poor miners still work around these old 
workings and obtain a considerable amount of 
quicksilver which is used by the mines of 
Sinaloa. Rich specimens come in daily from 
various sections of unexplored country, pro- 
mising vast discoveries. At 40 leagues from 
this city in Guerrero immense deposits have 
just been discovered bearing two minerals; one 
containing mercury, sulphur and autimony; 
the other oxide of antimony, mercury and sili- 
cate yielding 10 to 14 per cent, of quicksilver. 
Furnaces are needed, the present earthen vases 
being wholly insufficient. There is an old 
mine near Pregones between Tasco and Za- 
cualpan, 50 leagues from this capital, which 
since the time of the Spaniards has yielded 
rich cinnabar. Ore four inches wide yields 70 
per cent, in clay containing 10 to 20 per cent, 
in a well defined ledge connected with a silver- 
bearing ledge. 

By operating the 50 known deposits, Mexico 
could produce 2,000,000 to 2,500,000 K>s. re- 
quired for home consumption and probably 
have some over for export. 



The Carolina Parrot. 

The Carolina parrot, or parrakeet, shown in 
the accompanying cut, is the only one of the 
two hundred species of its genus, which has 
been found in the United States. It is restricted 
to the warmer parts, rarely venturing north and 
east of Virginia, though it visits much higher 
latitudes in the West. But it is abundant in 
the regions of its residence, namely, South 
Carolina, Georgia, Florida.Alabama, Louisiana, 
and along the Mississippi up to Kentucky. 

These parrakeets are exceedingly annoying 
to the farmers, not only in consuming, but iu 
laying waste and destroying his grain in stacks 
or standing in the field. They also lay waste 
orchards of pear and apple trees, merely for the 
seeds, and this often before the fruit is ripe, 
when they consequently will not eat the Beeds. 
They come in large numbers, and, though they 
appear to be concerned for the slaughter of 
their companions, they will not fly away from 
the deadly weapon which is destroying them; 
thus hundreds are often slain by the side of a 
single stack of grain, which they had covered 
sc densely as to appear like a vast green carpet 
spread over it. 

The roosting places of this species are in 
hollow trees, and the holes excavated by the 
larger species of wood-peokers. At duBk, a 
flock may be seen alighting against the trunk 
of a large sycamore or other'tree having a con- 
siderable excavatien within it. Alighting on 
the bark beneath the aperture, as mauy as can 
crawl into it do so, and the rest attach them- 
selves by claw and bill to the exterior, and here 
repose throughout the night. 

The flight of this bird is rapid and straight, 
through the forest or over rivers and fields, ac- 
companied by inclinations of the body, which 
expose to view alternately the upper and under 
parts. They deviate from a direct course only 
when impediments occur, when they glide 
gracefully aside and continue on. They keep 
up a general cry when on the wing. They cir- 
cle wide and high over a spot before alighting, 
and move with facility upon the trees, often in 
a sideling way; or hang in every imaginable 
posture. On the greund they are awkward 
and helpless. They are easily tamed, being 
subdued by repeated immersions in water. But 
as they cannot be educated to utter words, as 
their screams are very discordant, and especially 
as they are exceedingly destructive, they ought 
not to be regarded as desirable pets. 



Steel Shoes and Dies. 

A correspondent of the Stock Report, at Vir- 
ginia City, writes under date of the 2d: 

Considerable interest is being taken among 
mining men now in regard to the new steel 
shoes and dies recently introduced by the Cast 
Steel Shoe and Die company of San Francisco, 
and I have been examining into it a little my! 
self. I saw to-day a battery of five shoes und 
dies sent to the Rhode Island mill. They were 
put in on the 2d of December, and have been 
inconstant use until to-day (31 days). The 
shoes are worn less than one inch, and are 
very even. The wearing of the dies is scarcely 
perceptible. The forefnan thinks the shoes 
will laBt four months yet. At a shop on C 
street they have on exhibition a die made of 
steel, which had been used at the Morgan mill 
continually for four months, and which was 
still in good condition, to appearances, for more 
stamping. I visited the Morgan mill also, and 
Superintendent Hanson informed me that he 
had used two sets of steel shoes and dies, the 
shoes lasting four months and the dies six. At 
16 cents per pound for steel and 6% cents for 
iron, he finds a great percentage in favor of 
steel, not taking into consideration the great 
gain in the increased crushing capacity, by rea- 
son of the steel wearing more evenly. Mackey 
& Fair have ordered a sample set for the Sao- 
ramento mill, and if they prove successful 
they will be introduced into every quartz mill 
on the Comstock. 



In view of the mines already discovered and 
the strong presumption of other good mines in 
this vicinity, says the Mendooino Dispatch, a 
miners' meeting was held in Ukiah on Thursday 
last, at which a code of laws to govern mining 
in the district was adopted, and S. Wurtenberg 
was elected Recorder. 



A Snow Slide occurred near Alta City, Utah, 
on the 11th inst., burying to the depth of 30 
feet four ore teams, and it is feared that five 
men were killed. 



The Union gravel mining company have com- 
pleted their tunnel to Kennebeck hill, Nevada 
county, and are taking out gold in large quan- 
tities. 



The hydraulic works at the Yellow Jacket 
quicksilver mine, Napa county, are in full 
operation. 

A rich strike has been made in the south 
drift of the Consolidated Poe mine, at Peavine. 



Iron ore has been found in the mountains 
east of San Fernando, Los Angeles county. 



Into claims to be the richest' mineral county 
in California. 



42 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



[January 16, 1875. 



San Francisco Microscopical Society. 

The regular meeting of the San Francisco 
Microscopical Society was held on Thursday 
evening of last week. 

The Secretary announced that additions to 
the library had been made by the purchase of 
two volumes of "British Diatomacese" and 
"Beck's Treatise on the Achromatic Micros- 
cope;" also, additions to the object cabinet by 
purchase of 66 slides mounted with various 
objects, comprising a series of the fatty acids, 
bone sections, vegetable fibers, diatoms, many 
miscellaneous objects, and one of J. D. Moller's 
Diatom Type Plates. One of Nachet's prisms 
for oblique light with high powers, was an- 
nounced as bavktg been received, and its capa- 
bilities were tested by Mr. Hyde with satisfac- 
tory results. 

Mr. H inks donated two slides mounted by 
him with iodide of mercury , and some specimens 
of topaz, from Durango, Mexico. 

Dr. Blake donated a slide mounted with a 
section of calcite, prepared by him from a 
beautiful specimen which he exhibited. 

Mr. Ewing donated two slides mounted wilh 
spicules of Gorgonia, and section of spine of 
echinus. 

Dr. Harkness donated 18 slides mounted with 
a fine variety of interesting objects which he 
had received in exchange ftom microscopistsin 
Providence, K. I. 

Captain John H. Mortimer sent the Society, 
through Mr. Kinne, a number of vials contain- 
ing boilings of diatoms and other objects, from 
18 different localities in various parts of the 
world. 

Mr. Kinne stated that he had examined the 
contents and found most of them very rich in 
varieties of diatoms, polycystina and fera- 
minifera. 

Dr. Thornton presented the Society with a 
number of samples of soundings from Santa 
Barbara channel. 

Dr. Harkuess made some interesting state- 
ments regarding the fungus found on the 
scorched willows in San Mateo county, and 
which he reported on at some length at pre- 
vious meeting, to the effect that since then he 
had forwarded the same to Professor Harlow, 
of Cambridge, and he had identified it as 
molaucomis stilbostoma — Tulasne. The Doctor 
further stated, regarding the nostoc which he 
had brought before the Society previously, that 
it had not been identified at either Yale or 
Harvard, and had been sent to Paris for the 
opinion of the highest known authority. 

The energy displayed in original investiga- 
tion by many of the members of this Society is 
attracting attention in other localities, and their 
membership is increasing rapidly. 

Several new proposals for resident member- 
ship were received, and the following named 
gentlemen were elected, having been proposed 
at a previous meeting, viz.: Mr. Ed. F. Hall, 
resident; Mr. Eugene Burgoyne, Paris, corres- 
ponding; and Dr. H. W. Harkness, honorary 
member. 

The unanimous compliment bestowed on the 
last named gentleman is a deserving one, the 
members fully appreciating what he has done 
as a corresponding member in tbe way of giving 
them freely of what information he had ob- 
tained in over twenty years' microscopical re- 
search. 



The Emma Mining Bubble. 

For several years past the Little Emma 
Mining company of Utah has been a by-word 
in financial circles and a reproach to Americans, 
finable to float the enterprise in this market, 
its promoters went abroad, and in the London 
market found people eager to jump at the bait. 
High hopes were entertained, but they were 
speedily dashed to the ground. The history of 
the Emma mining scheme has been too often 
related by Englishmen and no less indignant 
but shrewd Americans, to need many words 
here. What now remains to be told, however, 
is the fact that the victims in England having 
ccme to the conclusion that it was useless to 
waste further effort in Umentations and denun- 
ciation-*, have resolved upon a vigorous prose- 
cution for tbe recovery of their money. With 
this object in view, suits have been beeun on 
both sides of the Atlantic. In Englanda peti- 
tion has been filed for the purpose of winding 
up the company. In this city, however, im- 
portant . proceedings have bee i instituted 
against the principals in the scheme. Upon 
the installation of the present Board of Direc- 
tors, a committee was appointed to come to 
this country, inspect the property, investigate 
the affairs of [he company, and take such ac- 
tion as might be necessary to secure the rights 
of the shareholders. General Gardiner, the 
chairman of the company, and Mr. Turner, his 
solicitor, undertook the investigation. They 
came to this country, visited the mines at Utah, 
and upon their return to New York ordered 
Shipman, Barlow Larocque and Mucfarland to 
begin a suit against Trenor W. Park, Senator 
Stewart, of Nevada, and General Baxter for 
$5,000,000. the complaint charging fraud and 
conspiracy. 

The law firm learning that Mr. Park, who is 
the President' of the Panama Railroad, an*! the 
promoter or owner of a new set of mines in 
California, was on the point of leaving this city 
for California, served a summons upon him to 
answer, and acquired jurisdiction before he had 
left the city. In -deference to Mr. Park's re- 
quest, however, no further proceedings were 
taken, as he wished to have his answer ready 
for publication simultaneously with the com- 
plaint. He has just reached San Francisco, 



and it is expected that he will be absent only a 
few weeks. Upon his return there will be 
further proceedings. 

General Gardiner and Solicitor Turner have 
returned to England, where they .will report to 
their constituents. The principal ground of 
complaint on the part of the shareholders was 
that they had been led to expect dividends of 
from 70 to 80 per cent. They had only received 
dividends of from 1 to 1% p^r cent, a month 
for ten months, and the dividend for the last 
two months of payment had been borrowed, 
They complain that on the strength of the 
promises of extraordinary dividends large sums 
of money were obtained from confiding share- 
holders.— N. T. Tribune, Dec. 2Qth. 

Mining Operations in Calaveras County, 

The Calaveras Gl&oniole says : A review of the 
field of mining operations in this county devel- 
ops a most" encouraging condition of tnat inte- 
rest. In both quartz and gravel mining the 
progress being made is wholly satisfactory, and 
the outlook for the future is as promising as 
could be desired. In the West Point, Mosquito, 
Railroad Flat and Sheep Ranch districts a 
greater number of ledges are being worked, more 
men and capital are employed and more bul- 
lion being produced than at any other time 
since the inception of quartz mining. Increased 
activity is also observable in other districts 
throughout tbe country, and we are constantly 
hearing of the inauguration of new enterprises. 
The success attendant upon the extended ope- 
rations at tbe Gwin mine, located on the great 
mother lode of the country, has erystalized 
faith in the permanency and value of our 
quartz ledges, into certainty, and been the 
means of redoubling exertions in their devel- 
opment, The idea of a shaft being sunk a 
thousand feet upon a quartz ledge in Calaveras 
would have been sneered at a few years since, 
and yet ore is being mined at that depth in the 
Gwin, to day, and better than all that, the ope- 
ration pays. By the prosecution of this great 
industry employment is furnished, directly and 
indirectly to a large number of hands, and a 
quickening impulse given to other branches of 
business. Leaving aside the principal fact that 
quartz mining in this county is now more re- 
munerative than formerly, the next feature in 
importance is that the nap-hazard, unsyste- 
matic style of prosecuting it is giving place to 
a methodical well ordered manner of conduct- 
ing operations. Quartz mining has ceased to 
be regarded as entirely speculative in character. 
Men engage in it the, same as in other legiti- 
mate enterprises, with a full understanding that 
it can be made successful only by a careful ob- 
servance of the ordinary rules of business 
life. A great deal of time and money has been 
spent in ascertaining that fact, but the lesson is 
well learned and its utility will be felt in the 
future. Quartz mining in this county is yet in 
its infancy, but it is an interest of sturdy 
growth and is rapidly developing into one of 
first importance. 

Even greater progress is being made in gravel 
than in quartz mining. In this vicinity, es- 
pecially, tnat interest has revived wondertully 
during the past two years, and we believe there 
are more sluice-boxes set now than at any time 
since water was first brought to Mok«lumne 
hill. The reduction in the price of water, the 
introduction of labor-saving appliances and the 
knowledge gained by practical experience have 
combined in vastly enlargitig the scope of 
gravel mining and increasing ihe product of it. 
Claims long since pronounced exhau>ted and 
abandoned, as well as acres upon acres of 
ground that the superficial prospecting of early 
days failed to develop the richness of, are now 
being energetically and profitably worked. The 
substitution of gunpowder aud hydraulic pres- 
sure for muscle in the wearing away of our 
gravel banks has wrought a revolution in the 
whole system of mining — a change that is tell- 
in every day in the unparalleled development 
of that interest. Aud yet the revivification of 
gravel mining has but just commenced. There 
are square miles of gold-bearing gravel fields 
in this county that the hand of the miner has 
not yet touched — repositories of wealth that 
the key of enterprise can readily unlock. The 
tuture of gravel mining in this county, judging 
from the rapidly increasing importance of that 
industry, is indeed promising and" encouraging. 
But one county in the State — Nevada — now ex- 
ceeds Calaveras in the production of its gravel 
mines, and the day is not far distant when even 
that solitary exception will not have to be 
made. 

No other section of the State offers so favor- 
able opportunities for the investment of capital 
in mining enterprises as Calaveras. This 
couniy contains a very large area of mining 
territory, and in consequence development has 
been slower than in sections where the mineral 
belt is confined to narrower limits. The county 
is now just thoroughly prospected, a fact that 
enables men of means to step in and make in- 
vestments, based upon certainties which labor 
alone is powerless to take advantage of. Mines 
known to be valuable can be purchased cheap 
because tbe owners have exhausted their means 
in proving the worth of their property apd will 
be forced to relinquish the prize when it is 
almost within their grasp. Capital is master 
of the situation, and can mane investments 
upon its own terms. The field is certainly a 
most inviting one, and it will be surprising if 
men with money to put into mining enterprises 
do not make Calaveras the theatre of their ven- 
tures in the future. 



The new hall of the miners of Ruby Hill was 
dedicated on the 30th ult, 



Quicksilver Production of Colusa County. 

The quicksilver production of Colusa county 
is rapidly rising into importance. Lying in a 
Bouth west direction, and about thirty-five 
miles distant from the town of Colusa are a 
number of quicksilver mines in various stages 
of development; a few of them are sufficiently 
developed to prove them to be very valuable, 
whilst others, though but little prospected, 
show satisfactory indications of their future 
-value. These mines are situated on Sulphur 
creek, and in the hills bounding Bear valley on 
the west. The Buckeye mine ranks first in the 
amount of quicksilver produced. This mine 
has been worked by the present owners for 
about three years. It has yielded during the 
last twelve months 520 flasks of quicksilver. 
The mine was worked with ordiuary retorts 
until about two months ago, when the company 
completed one of Knox & Osborn's patent fur- 
naces at a cost of $11,000, The furnace is now 
running out quicksilver at the rate of eighty 
flasks a month, and the production will soon be 
increased to at least one hundred flasks a month. 
The Abbott mine is another well known and 
valuable mine. It has yielded a good deal of 
quicksilver during the last five years though 
until recently it has not been worked with reg- 
ularity or system. Since the present company 
took charge of tbe mine, about eight months 
ago, it has been thoroughly opeoened, and a 
large amount of fine ore taken out. A furnace, 
Bimilar in all respects to that of the Buckeye, 
has been erected upon the* mine, and has been 
in successful operation for two or the months. 
The Abbott had no reduction works upon it 
before the completion of its furnace, but its 
furnace has already yielded 125 flasks of quick- 
silver, and is now producing about like the 
Buckeye, with equally fair prospects for the 
futute. The Elgin mine, with one small retort 
upon it, has produced, within the last five 
months, sixty flasks of quicksilver. The mine 
is being constancy worked now, and is very 
promising. The Manzauita mine has no reduc- 
tion works. 

It has, however, been worked for several 
years, and considerable quantities of very fine 
or* have been taken from it and reduced else- 
where. Duriog the last twelve months it has 
produced considerable quicksilver, but we are 
not informed as to the number of flasks. So 
with four or five other mines in the immediate 
vicinity. Good ores have been taken from them 
in large or small, quantities, aud they have all 
produced some quicksilver, but we are mt ad- 
vised as to the quantity. On the Bear Valley 
range tbe Turner mine is conspicuous. A fur- 
nace has been erected upon this mine and is 
now about ready to receive ore. A large quan- 
tity of good ore has been taken out and is 
now awaiting reduction. The mine, we are 
told, is very promising. "We thus have for the 
year's production of quicksilver in Colusa 
county, 705 flasks as the total amount. We 
may prob bly add to this amount 45 flasks as 
the production of the several other mines above 
mentioned, which are not credited with the spe- 
cific quantity of quicksilver taken from each 
during the year— making, in all, 750 flasks as 
the total production for the year. This is cer- 
tainly a showing for a mining district t at was 
unknown outside of he immediate vicinity six 
months ago, and for a mining district that is as 
yet almost wholly unprospected. Our quick- 
silver mines are beginning now to attract con 
siderable attention, and they will probably pre- 
sent a very different appearance twelve months 
hence. Intelligent gentlemen, well acquainted 
with cinnabar ores, have lately visited our 
mines, and have expressed, the opinion that we 
have one of the richest quicksilver regions in 
the State. It certainly presents a fine field for 
enterprising men and capitalists. — Colusa Sun. 

The new 60-stamp mill of the Virginia Con- 
solidated Mining company was started up on 
Thursday evening for a trial of the machinery. 
Another mill of the same size will be com- 
menced for the California mine. The Ophir 
company will also follow suit with a big mill, 
and next the Sierra Nevada with a 60-stamper> 

Encouraging. — It may be an encouraging 
fact to some one to know that Ezra Corvel, the 
late philanthropist milliona ire, was so 
poor at one period of his life that the lucky 
finding of a (New York) shilling in the street 
once prevented his going dinnerless. 

Tall and bulky people require more sleep 
than thin people. In a state of health, the 
amount of sleep required to restore nervous 
energy averages from six to eight hours. Sleep 
on the right side, and eat nothing heavy be- 
fore retiring. 

Jas. Tylee, of Tyler's ranch, about midway 
between Lakeport and Cloverdale, has discov- 
ered a well-defined ledge of gold-bearing quartz 
on the ridge that divides the waters of Russian 
river and Clear lake. 



The mining excitement at Varyville contin- 
ues at fever heat; several new ledges have been 
discovered and located within the past week, 
and the hills are full of hardy miners hunting 
for more. 



During the month of December 3,143 car- 
loads of ore, aggregating 23,000 tons were 
shipped over the railroad from the Oomstock 



The Helena (Montana) Indedendent claims 
that the mines of Montana now produce a much 
larger percentage of precious metals per capita 
tlian any other mining region in the wor)d. 



[Business Notice.] 

Mining and Scientific Press, 

A VALUABLE WEEKLY FOR 

Miners. Mechanics and Manufacturers 
on the Pacific Coast. 

Volume XXX of this first-class, standard 
journal commences with the year 1875. Its 
proprietors, having the successful experience 
of ten yearB publication of the Press, have no 
hesitation in saying that for the ensuing year 
the paper shall, in keeping with the times, 
reach a higher mark of merit than ever before. 

"With our own printing press, folding ma- 
chine, 

Able Editors, Correspondents, 

And skilled workmen in different departments 
of our now extensive and growing establish- 
ment, we mean to print a journal throughout 
the year, which all citizens, whether patrons 
or not, may be proud of seeing published and 
supported on this side of the continent. 

No kindred journal in America furnishes 
more real 

Fresh, Novel, Interesting Information 

In its volumes than the Mining and Scientific 
Pbess. "We have the 

Largest Mining Field in the World 

To report from. It embraces the largest variety 
of mines and mining; methods of working; and 
910 ui numerous wonderful discoveries than any 
other section of the globe. It is the birth place 
of many of the 

Latest and Best Inventions in Gold, 
Silver and Labor Saving, 

"With brief, reliable, well chosen and prepared 
editorials; varied and condensed correspond- 
ence and selections; tables and statistics ar- 
ranged for ready reference, 

Superior Illustrations, 

Of local and gerjeral interest to its readers, it 
forms a weekly jonrnal of individual character 
and unrivalled worth to its intelligent and in- 
dustrial Patrons at home and abroad. It is the 

Leading Mining Journal of America, 

And in its practical, interesting and substantial 
make up, it is unrivalled by any mining or 
mechanical journal in the world. 

Home Manufactures and Home Inven- 
tions 

Will be constantly encouraged. Both help to 
build up the brain and material wealth of the 
country. They are kindred to our individual 
enterprise. Our interests are mutual with all 
home artizans and producers. Where on the 
face of the globe do inventors and Manufac- 
turers either need or deserve more encourage- 
ment? 

Its Value to the Community, 

In disseminating importaut information; dissi- 
pating false notions; checking expensive follies; 
instigating important enterprises; by wise coun- 
sel and scientific direction, enrich: ng the rewards 
of honest labor, we are annually saving and 
adding 

Millions of Dollars 

To the products of our country. The Press 
has already 

A Large Circulation, 

And is deserving of more universal patronage 
from those whose interests it specially repre- 
sents. This sparsely populated portion of the 
Union is a difficult one for publishers to pre- 
sent the claim of their journal in to all who 
should subscribe. In these times of seemingly 
cheap (but largely, trashy and worthless) jour- 
nalism, it is desirable and proper that those 
who know the real merits of a faithful journal 
should 

Speak and Act in its Favor. 

"We shall not spare our efforts to make sound 
and improved issues, maintaining constantly 
the rights of all, and forwarding the material 
and intellectual rights of our patrons, and of 
our sturdy, progressive community. 

Necessarily, scientific and mining publica- 
tions generally are costly and high priced, but 
considering the size, character and location of 
our publication, our rates are favorable for so 
valuable a print. 

We invite correspondence from all sections. 

Subscriptions, payable in advance, $4 a year. 
Single copies, postpaid, 10 cents. 

Address, DEWEY & CO-, 

Publishers, No. 224 Sansome St., S. F, 



5 January i6, 1875J 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



43 



DEWEY & CO 

American and Foreign 



fatcirt 




No. ««^ £)ansiome Ht- 

SAN FRANCISCO, 
Patents Obtained Promptly. 
Caveats Filed Expeditiously. 
Patent Reissues Taken Out. 
Patents Secured in Foreign Lands. 
iasignments Made and Recorded in Legal Form. 
3opies of Patents and Assignments Prooured. 
Summations of Patents made here and at 

Washington. 
Examinations made of Assignments Recorded 

in Washington. 
jjCxaminations Ordered and Reported by Tble- 

obapu. 
Interferences Prosecuted. 

)pinious Rendered regarding the Validity o! 
Patents and Assignments. 
Rejected Cases taken up and Patents Obtained 
Svery Legitimate Branch of Patent Agency Bus 

iness promptly and thoroughly conducted. 

SKND FOB ClBCDTiAB. 



'opulation of the U. S,— Census of 1870 



Uabania 996, 

Lrkansas 484 

Jalifornia 5t>0 

Jonnecticut 5U7 

)elaware 

'lorida , .187 

Jeorgia 1.184 

llinois 2,539 

ndiana 1, 

owa 1,191 

Eansae 364, 

Eentucfey 1,321 

Louisiana 726. 

Ilaino 626, 

ItassachusottS 1,457 

aichigan 1,184 

tfaryland 780, 

Minnesota 439,' 

lisssisippi 827, 

ilissourl 1,721 

Nebraska 122 

fevada 42, 

Jew Hampshire 318,: 

tfew Jersey 906, 

few York 4,382 

Uorth Carolina 1,071 

)bio 2,665 



Oregon 90,923 

Pt-niisylvania 3,521,791 

Rbode Island 217.353 

South Carolina 705,606 

Tennessee 1.258,520 

Texas 818,579 

Vermont. w 3)0,551 

Virginia 1,225,163 

West Virginia 442,014 

Wisconsin 1,054,670 



Total.. 



38,113,253 

Territories. 

Arizona 9,658 

Colorado 39 ,864 

Dakota 14,181 

District Columbia. ..131,700 

Idaho 14,999 

Montana 20,595 

New Mexico 91,874 

Utah 86,786 

Washington 23,955 

Wyoming 9,118 



Total 442,780 

Grand Total 38,555,983 



Population of Some Foreign Countries, : 

Which Dewey & Co. Obtain Patents 

and Protection for Inventors. 



Janada .3,537,887 

Jreat Britain 31,187,108 

france 36,583,559 

ielglum 4,839.094 

■■russia 24,043.902 

Luatria & Hnng'y.35,943,1 

luasia 77,268,858 

Ipain 16,031,267 

■taly 25,906,937 

Iweeden 4,195,681 

RNorway 1,701,478 

'froland 5,317,362 

(Denmark 1,726,724 



Baden 1.434 

Bavaria ,4,824 

Portugal 8,996 

Saxony 2,423 

Hanover 385, 

Wurtemburg 1.778 

Brazil 11,780 

Chili 2,000 

Peru 2,500. 

N.Grenada 2,794 

India 191,000, 

Australia 1,500, 

N.Zealand 326 



IjFroiseth's New Sectional, Topographical 
and Mineral 

MAP OF UTAH. 

Size, 40 bi 56 Inches; Scale, 8 Miles to an Inch. 

|| Handsomely engraved on Btone, colored in counties 
kind mounted on cloth, showing the Counties, Towns, 
Ptivera, LakeB, Railroads, Mines and Mining Districts 
(throughout the Territory, and all Govebnmbnt Suhvetb 
made to date. Price, mounted, $8; Pocket form, $5. 

— ALSO— 

New Mining- Map of TTtah, 
(Showing the boundaries of the principal mining dis- 
ltrlcts, some 30 in number, adjacent to Salt Lake Olty. 
(Price, pocket form, $2.50. 

— ALSO— 

(Froiseth's New Map of Little Cottonwood 
Mining- District and "Vicinity 

(Showing the location of some 400 mines and tunnel 
(sites, together with the mines surveyed for U, S. Pat- 
lent. Price $3. . For sale and mailed to any part of the 
(globe, ou receipt of price, by A. L. BANCROFT h CO., 
A. ROMAN & CO., and LeCOUNT BROS. & MANSUR, 
|San Francisco. 10v25-tf 



TWELVE C#LUMNS OF PRICES EVERY WEEK. 



SAN FRANCISCO 

JOURNAL OF COMMERCE 

— AND— 

Weekly Price Current. 

NO MERCHANT SHOULD BE WITHOUT IT. 

W. H. MTTBBAT, Btulness Mauneer. 
414 Clay Street. 



RELIABLE REVIEWS OF THE MARKETS. 



New Inventions 1 

Of real merit, if brought plainly before the publio 
When fresh, are most likely to become profitable to the 
patentee. For this reason, patentees (of worthy de- 
vices) Bhould have the best of Engravings Made, and 
published in the Pbess. Superior Engravings Made, 
At reasonable rates, by arti sts Is this office- bp-tf 



banking. 



The Pacific Mutual Life Insurance 
Company of California. 

No- 41 Second street. - - - Sacramento 
ACCUMULATED FUND, NEARLY 

#i,«so,ooo.oo. 



f 100,000 Approved Securities, deposited with the Oali- 

furaia State Department as security for 

Policy holders everywhere. 



LELAND 8TANFORD President 

J. H. CARROLL. Vice-President 

JOS. CRACKBON Secretary 

All Policies issued by this Company, and the proceeds 
thereof, are exempt from execution by the Jaws of Cal- 
fornia. THE ONLY STATE IN THE UNION that pro- 
vides for this exemption. 

•^"Policies issued by this Company arc non-forfeita- 
ble, and all profits are divided among the injured. 

Policies may be made payable in Gold or Currency 
as the applicant may elect, to pay his premium. 

Executive Committee : 
Lrland Stanford, J. H. Cabboll, 

IIodt. Hamilton, Samuel Lavenson, 

Jas. Caeolan. 



SCHBEIBER & HOWELL, 



ARE YOU GOING 

TO PAINT ? 

THEN TTSE THE BEST. 



THE AVER1LL CHEMICAL PAINT 

WTLLLA.RT THREE TIMES AS LONG as the best lead 
and oil, without CHALKING; is of any desired color. 
It is prepared for Immediate application, requiring no 
Oil, Thinner or Drier, aud does not spoil by standing 
any length of time. It iB equally as good for inside as 
ontside work; over old work as well as new; Infant, 
where an> paint can be used the AVERILL CHEMICAL 
PAINT will be found superior to any other. Any one 
can apply it who can use a brush, which truly makes It 
the FARMER'S FRIEND. 

IT IS JUST THE PAINT FOR THE AGE. 

IT IS SOLD BY THE GALLON ONLY. 

One gallon covers 20 square yards 2 coats. 

For further Information Bend for sample card and 
price list. 

MANUTAOTTTRED BT 

The California Chemical Paint Company. 

TYLER BEACH, Pres't. M. 0. JEWELL, Seo-y. 

Office— Corner Fourth and Townsend streets, San 
Francisco. 16v7-eow-bp-3m 



TX-2!>-eow-bp-3in 



General Agent-*, Sacramento. 



Anglo-Californian Bank. 

LIMITED. 

Successors to J. Seligrnan & Co. 

London Office No. 3 Angel Court 

San Francisco Office No. 412 California street. 

Authorized Capital Stock, $5,000,000, 

Subscribed, $3,000,000. Paid In, $1,500,000. 
Remainder subject to call. 

Diukctoicr in London— Hon. Hugh McOulloch, Reuben 
D. Saflsoon, William b\ Scnolfield, Isaac SeliEman, Julias 

Sinnton. 

Managers: 

F. F. LOW and IONATZ STEINHAKT, 

San Fuanoisco. 
The Bank is now prepared to open aocounts, receive de- 

Eoaits, make collections, buy and sell Exchange, and issue 
ettera of Credit available throughout the world, and to 
loan money on proper securities. 2v27-eowbp 



The Merchants' Exchange Bank 

OF SAM FRANCISCO. 

Capital, One Million Dollars. 

O. W. KELLOGQ President. 

H. P. HA8TING3 Manager. 

K. N. VAS BRUNT OaBhjer. 

BANKING HOUSE, 
No. 423 California street, San Franclaco. 

Kototse Brothers, Bankers, 

12 WALL STREET, NEW YORK, 

Allow interest at the rate of Four per cent, npor 
daily balances of Gold and Currency. 

Receive consignments of Gold, Silver and Lead 
Bullion, and make Cash advances thereon. 

Invite Correspondence from Bankers, Mining 
Companies, Merchants and Smelting Works. 

French Savings' and Loan Society, 

ill Bush street, above Kearny 8AN FRANCISCO 

4v27tf Or. MAHE, Director. 



uu$ipe$? birectory. 



.7 ILK H H. GHAT. 



JAHBff K. HAVBS. 



G-RAY & HAVEN, 

ATTORNEYS AND COUNSELORS AT LAW 

In Building of Pacific Insurance Co., N. K. corner Oal 

'orniaanr Leidesdorff streets, 

<UN FRANPTS n <"> 



JOHN ROACH, Optician, 

429 Montgomery Street. 

. W, corner Sacramento. 
:Vu i instruments made, repaired and adjusted 



JOSEPH GILLOTTS 

STE EL PB Wa 
Sold by all DpalerB throughout the World. 



19v26-ly 



WM. BAHTLIMG. 



USHBT KIMBALL. 



BARTLING & KIMBALL, 
BOOKBINDERS, 

Paper Eiders and Blank Book Manufacturers. 

SOS Clay street, {southwest cor. Sansome), 
15vl2-Sm SAN FRANCISCO 



BENJAMIN MORGAN, 

Attorney at Law and Counselor in Patent Cases, 

Office, 207 Sansome Street, S. F. 

Refers to Dewey & Co., Patent Agents; Judge S. 
Heyaenfeldt or H, H. Haight, 0T2>3m 




WATER TANKS of any capacity, made entire 
by machinery. Material the best in use; constructio 
not excelled. Attention, dispatch, satisfaction. Oob 
less than elsewhere. 

WELLS, B.TTSSELL & CO., 

Mechanics' Mills, Oor. Mission & Fremont Streets. 
3v28-3m-sa 




Self-Fastening 
Bad-Spring. 

"We manufacture all Bizes of BED and FURNITURE 
SPRINGS, from No. 7 to the smallest Pillow Spring; 
also, the Double Spiral Spring, which is the most dura- 
ble Bed Spring in use. It is adapted to upholstered or 
Bkeleton beds. We have the sole right in this State to 
make the .celebrated Obermann Self-Fastening Bed 
Spring. Any man can make his own spring bed with 
them. They are particularly adapted to Farmers' and 
Miners' use. Send for Circulars and Price List to 

WARNER, & SILSBY, 

Uv28-eow-bo-3m 147 New Montgomery St., S. F 



SANBORN & BYRNES, 



(py 


sBST '^&=^ 


ps^ — — 



Mechanics' Mills, Mission Street, 

Bet. First and Fremont, San Francisco. Orders from 
the country promptly attended to. All, kinds of ^talr 
Material furnished to order. Wood and Ivory Turn- 
ers. Billiard Balls and Ten PinB, Fancy Newels and 
Balusters. 25v8-8m-bp 



Every Mechanic 

Should have a copy of Brown's 

507 MECHANICAL MOVEMENTS, 

Illustrated and deBcribed. 

Inventors, model makers and ameature mechanics 
and students, will find the work valuable far beyond 
itB cost Published by- Dewey & Co., Patent Agents 
and publishers of the Mining and Scientific Press. 

Price, post paid, $1. 



IVOINri^RXGIL OIL. 

140 Degrees Eire Test, for Family Use. 

OWNERS OF MILLS AND MANUFACTORIES, your 
attention is particularly called to this beautiful and 
safe Illuminating 0m. Its use is urgently recom- 
mended by the New York Fire Commissioners and In- 
surance Companies. For sale to the trade in lots to 
suit. A. HAYWARD, 224 Oaliferoia St. 

19v28-3m 



BETTER THAN MINING STOCK. 

A valuable Patent for sale. No objection to taking 
real estate in part payment. Residence, Washington 
street on the levee, P.O., Sacramento. 



Jan2- bp-tf 



O. A. DAVIS, 



(detalllifgy and Ore?. 



JOHN TAYLOR & CO., 

IMPORTER8 OF AND DEALERS IN 

ASSAYERS' MATERIALS 

Chemical Apparatus and Chemicals, 

Druggists' Glassware and Sundries, 

PHOTOGRAPHIC GOODS, ETC., 
512 and 514 Washington Btreet, SAN FRANOISOO 

Wo would call the special attention of Aftaayerfl 
OhemlRta, Mining Companies, Milling Companies 
.Prospectors, etc., to our large and well adapted stock 

ASSAYERS' MATERIALS 



Chemical Apparatus, 
Having been engaged in furnishing these BupplieB sines 
the first discovery of mines on the Pacific Coast 
»9- Our Oold and Bllver Tables, showing tho value 
per ounce Troy at different degrees of fineness, and val- 
uable tables for computation of aBsayB in Grains 
Grammes, will be sent free upon application. 
7v25.tf JOHN TAYLOR & CO. 



Varney's Patent Amalgamator. 

These Machines Stun. I Unrivaled. 

For rapidity pulverizing and amalgamating ores, they 
have no equal. No effort has been, or will be spared 
to have them constructed in the moBt perfect manner 
and of the great number now in operation, not one has 
ever required repairs. The constant and increasing de- 
mand for them is sufficient evidence of thflir merits. 

They are constructed so as to apply steam directly 
into the pulp, or with steam bottoms, as desired. 

This Amalgamator Operates as Follows-. 

Tho pan being filled, the motion of the muller forces 
the pulp to the center, where it is drawn down through 

the apperture and between the grinding surfaces. 

Thence it is thrown to the periphery into the quichsi 1 ver. 
The curved plates again draw it to the center, where it 
passes down, and to the circumference as before. Thus 
it is constantly passing a regular flow between the grind- 
ing surfaces and into the quicksilver, until .the ore is 
reduced to an impalpable powder, and the metal amal- 
gamated. 

Setlers made on the same principle excel all others 
They bring the pulp so constantly and perfectly in con- 
tact with quicksilver, that the particles are rapidly and 
completely absorbed. 

Hill-men are invited to examine these pans and setlers 
for themselves, at the office, 229 Fremont Street, 

San FrancinoA 



Nevada Metallurgical Works, 

21 First street San Francisco. 



Ores worked by any process. 

Ores sampled. 

Assaying in all its branches. 

Analysis of Ores, Minerals, Waters, etc. 

Plans furnished for the most suitable pro- 
cess for working Ores. 

Special attention paid to the Mining and 
Metallurgy of Quicksilver. 

X. N. RIOTTE, 
C. A. I/TJCKftARDT, 
Mining Engineers and Metallurgists. 



RODGr£RS, MEYER & CO.. 

COMMISSION MEBCHANTH 

JLDPA.NCJBS HAftI 
Oh all klnda or Oral, and purtlcnlnr uttentlov 

PAID TO 

COMUOXUEHTH OF ODOM. 
4vlS-Sm 

LEOPOLD KTJH, 

(Formerly of the U. 8. Branch Mint, B. F.) 

Assayer uiitl Wletallnrsfioa} 

CHEMT8T, 
No. <I1 1 Gom'me rclnl Street, 

(Opposite the U . S. Branch Mint 

Saw Fbanotsoo Oal. 7v2i-*tm 

California Assay Office— J. A. Mars & 

"Wm.Irelan, Jr., Chemists and ABsayers, Rooms il and 
48 Merchants' Exchange, San Francisco. Anah siB of 
Ores. Min«rnl WnterR Etc fti 2R-Sni 



San Francisco cordage Company. 

Established 1866. 

"We have just added a large iininnt of new machinery o 
the latest and most improved kind, and are again prepared 
to fill orders for Rope of any special lengths and sizes. Con- 
stantly on handalarge stock of Manila Rope, all sizes; 
Tarred Manila Rope ; Hay Rope ; Whale Line, etc., etc. 

TTJBBS & CO., 

de20 611 and G13 Front street. San Francisco. 

Glasgow Iron and Metal Importing Co. 

Have always on hand a large Stock of 

Bar and Bundle Iron, Sheet and Plate Iron 

Boiler Flues. Gasand Water Pipe, Cast 

Steel, Plow and Shear Steel, Anvils, 

Cumberland Coal, Etc. 

WM. McCRINDLE, Manager, 22 &24 Fremont St., S. F. 

m6-m2 



Buy Real Estate while at Low Rates. 

NINE WATER-FRONT LOTS, CHEAP, 
On Gift Map 4, 

Forming ahout half of a block fronting on the broad 
ship channel of iBlais Creek; will be sold so low as to 
make it an inducement to the bnyer. Inquire for the 
owner at this office, hptf 



44 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



[January 16, 1875. 



Grain Elevators. 

For shipping grain in bulk on this coast, 
"whereby an immense sum can be saved to our 
producers, we need elevators to handle the 
grain from cars and schooners to ocean ships. 
Consequently, we are happy to notice that Mr. 
Chase, of Illinois, is now at the Cosmopolitan 
hotel, in this city, with plans to show what 
can be done in this line to cheapen our wheat 
transportation. The El Paso Journal, HI., 
give the following concerning the success of 
his elevators elsewhere: 

The new system of grain elevation, by Henry 
I. Chase & Co., of Peoria, to which we have 
often called attention in these columns, is a 
great success; so much so that it promises to 
drive the other elevators out of the market. 
A new house of 600,000 bushels capacity is now 
going up in Chicago. The parties in Kansas 
City, Mo., who have just finished theirs, speak 
in high terms of it, and wherever it has been 
introduced it gives the most perfect satisfac- 
tion. Its main points are: First — Economy. 
It costs about half an old-style elevator. Sec- 
ond — Simplicity. It contains little machinery, 
and can be run with one quarter of the force. 
Third — Safety. It inbuilt on the ground, so 
that neither the tornados of the prairies nor the 
earthquakes of the mountains can shake it. 
We have seen a great many parties wh,o have 
witnessed its workings, and we never saw any- 
one yet who was not*perfectly satisfied with it 
in every particular. Cheap, strong, simple, 
durable; it is destined to revolutionize the 
present system of grain handling in the W es 

General News Items. 

The Black Hills. — The avaricious gold- 
seekers who had defiantly pushed their way 
into the Black- Hills country in spite of the 
warnings and prohibitions of the Government 
have been driven out by the cavalry under Capt. 
Henry. This is a disagreeable climate in the 
winter — an Iceland compared with the gold and 
silver fields of California. Let the expelled 
miners turn their steps to California, and they 
will find richer mining than will ever be de- 
veloped east of the Kooky Mountains, in a 
climate unequalled even in sunny Italy, with 
abundance of game to satisfy all their sporting 
desires, together with the more substantial food 
and necessaries of life while mining. We may 
remark in this connection that recent dis- 
closures at Washington, seem to indicate that 
the gold reports from the Black Hills have been 
an artifice in favor of a country through which 
interested parties desire to build the Northern 
Pacific Railroad. 

The Bribery Investigation. — The commit- 
tee having this matter in hand have traced 
$750,000 to the very doors of Congress, where 
it disappears in the hands of men who refuse 
to tell what became of it. Under theBe circum- 
stances it is impossible to avoid the conclusion 
that some of it found its way into the pockets 
of members; and this conclusion brings into 
suspicion every member who labored or voted 
for the subsidy. The great mass of members 
cannot afford to rest under such suspicion. 
They must insist upon a full disclosure from 
those into whose httnds the money has been 
traced, whatever the consequences may be. 
The order of the speaker confining Irwin to 
the common jail, and indicating the commence- 
ment of legal proceedings whiuh will continue 
hia confinement after the expiration of Con- 
gress, is a step which bides no good to any 
one either directly or indirectly connected with 
this disgraceful transaction. 

The New Cubbenct Bill. — The bill for the 
resumption of specie payment which has just 
passed both Houses of Congress, provides: 

First — A. redemption of legal tenders, and of 
resumption of specie payments four years 
hence, on the 1st of January, 1879. 

Second — Free bankinc, in the widest sense of 
• an unlimited issue of National Bank currency. 

Third — A withdrawal of 80 per cent, of the 
amount issued in new bank currency from the 
volnme of greenbacks, until the amount of 
$300,000,000 for United States notes is reached. 

Fourth — A substitution of small silver coin 
for fractional currency. 

Fifth — An abolition of the mint charge. 

Killed by a Field Roller. — A severe and 
perhaps fatal accident occui red to Mr. Campea, 
of Borden, on the 4th inst. He was engaged 
in rolling his land, and some part of the wood- 
work of the rolling machine on which he was 
riding gave way, and he was precipitated to the 
earth in front of the roller, which passed over 
his body, crushing and mangling him in a fear- 
ful manner. The roller weighed 1,500 pounds. 

The Fibst Detention. — The first severe 
storm and cold weather during the winter oc- 
curred on Saturday night along the Union Pa- 
cific railroad. The thermometer marked 16 
degrees below zero at Omaha, aud 26 below at 
Cheyenne. The westward bound Union Pacific 
train was eleven hours late at Green River on 
Saturday evening. 

Coming to America. — It is said that Emillo 
Castellar the eminent statesman and Repub- 
lican leader of Spain is coming to this country. 
He will meet with a warm reception here. 
Spain, under its present regime can have but 
little attraction for him — even if he could re- 
main there with safety to his person. 



Reotpbooitt. with Hawaii. — Dispatches from 
Washington say that if the negotiators act 
promptly in settling up the details of the 
Hawaiian reciprocity treaty upon such a gen- 
eral character as is understood to be contem- 
plated, there is no doubt of its prompt ratifica- 
tion by the Senate. 

Scott's Railroad Bill. — Efforts are being 
made in Congress to have Tom Scott's bill 
amended so as to connect the Texas Pacific 
railroad with the Central Pacific railroad at 
at Fort Yuma, and thus leave the latter undis- 
puted control of the great route with Cali- 
fornia. 

Accidents at the Palaoe Hotel. — Several 
accidents occurred to workmen by falling from 
beams and scaffoldings at the Palace hotel 
during the past week. One of the natural 
results of building too high. 

The Healdsburg Flag states that a fire oc- 
curred in Point Arena Thursday last, which 
destroyed Lyman's hotel, McMullen's saloon, 
Shoemake's saloon, and a house belonging to 
Iverson. 

Railroad Fares in Nevada. — A bill has been 
introduced in the Nevada Legislature for regu- 
lating railroad fares and freight tariff in that 
State. A lively discussion may be expected 

Bank Notes Bubned.— Nearly $400,000 in 
new National bank notes were destroyed by the 
burning of a postal car on Thursday of last 
week on the Potomac railroad. 

The big bear that killed Berry near Sierra 
valley a few weeks since was dispatched last 
Thursday by a party of hunters. Bruin weighed 
800 pounds. 

Thbee men were burned to death by the des- 
truction by fire of the Western Hotel at Sacra- 
mento on Saturday last. 

Agricultural Items. 

Angoea Goats. — The Watsonville Pajaronian 
learns that E. R. Marsh, of Sau Francisco, has 
recently invested $27,000 in Angora goats; also, 
Win. Hall, of San Jose, lately purchased a lot 
at $11,480; and C. S. -Abbott, Flint, Bixby & 
Co., and B. Boswell have bought up all the 
stock of the Guadalupe Island company, except 
about 300 shares, and the stock held by Lan- 
drum & Rodgers. These men represent several 
million dollars, and mean business in goat 
raising. We may note in this connection that 
Landrum & Rodgers, of Watsonville. will, dur- 
ing the next two months, ship about 3,000 
pounds of mohair to Philadelphia. 

The Santa Clara Valley Agricultural Associ- 
ation on Thursday elected the following officers 
for 1875: Pre^ideut, W. C. Wilson; Vice-Pres- 
idents, Cyrus Jones and Jessie D. Carr; Secre- 
tary, Givens George; Treasurer, C. T. Ryland; 
Directors, William O'Donnell and S. J. Jami- 



In the foothills of Fresno county grass and 
volunteer grain is so forward that it would now 
make good hay. A gentleman informs the Ex- 
positor that he cut bay on his ranch on the last 
day of the year, but he couldn't cure it for the 
want of sun. 

The Lakeport Bee is informed that the to- 
bacco crop planted near Guenoc last year by 
A. A. Ritchie has proved successful. The crop 
has been cut and saved, and will be cured the 
corning spring. 

In the vicinity of Santa Barbara, a farmer 
last year rained over 60,000 pounds of Florida 
tobacco on 30 acres of land. He has sold the 
same at 40 cents per pound for Eastern ship- 
ment. 

It is reported that in Yuba county the cherry 
buds are much swollen, and that the frost has 
nipped a good portion of the crop. 

The next annual fair of the Santa Clara Val- 
ley Agricultural Society will be held the week 
following the close of the State Fair. 

The continued dry weather has seriously in- 
jured the volunteer potatoes growing near 
School House tation. 



Patents & Inventions. 



A Weekly List of U. S. Patents Is- 
sued to Pacific Coast Inventors. 

[Fbom Official Bjspobts fob the Mining and Scien- 
tific Pbesb, DEWEY & CO., Publishers and 
TJ. 8. and Fobeiqn Patent Agents.] 

By Special Dispatch, Dated "Washing-ton, 
D. C, Jan. 12th, 1875. 

Foe Week Ending Deo. 29th, 1874.* 
Almond Geateb. — Julius Leroy, S. F., Oal. 
Fbuit Deieb. — William S. Plummer, S. F. 
• Cal. 
Hay Peess.— John Wiley, San Andrea], Cal. 

*The patents are not ready for delivery by tee 

Patent Office until some 14 days after the date of issue. 
Note.— Copies of U. 8. and Foreign Patents furnished 
by .Dewey & Co., in the shortest time possible (by tel- 
egraph or otherwise) at the lowest rates. All patent 
business for Pacific coast inventors transacted with 
perfect security and in the shortest time possible. 

Woodwabd's Gabdens embraces an Aquariam, Mu- 
seum, Art Gallery, Conservatories, Tropical Houses 
menagerie Seal Ponds, and Skating Rink. 



Industrial Items. 

Mantjpactoeies at the South. — It is said 
that the cotton factories recently established at 
the South are the best paying industrial insti- 
tutions in the country. They have proved 
that the fabric could be worked to more pe- 
cuniary benefit where it was grown than in 
tlhose portions of the country generally known 
as the manufacturing districts. An important 
point, this, for California capitalists. 

Boston Enteepeise. — Boston is showing 
much enterprise in further pushing out her 
iron arms for the trade of the West. A special 
committee of the Massachusetts Legislature is 
now examining the terminal facilities of the 
Baltimore and Ohio Railroad company, for the 
purpose of legislative action in making South 
Boston fiats the terminus of a through railroad 
line from the West to that seaboard. 

Tunneling the Niagara. -A plan for tunneling' 
the Niagara river at Buffalo has been prepared 
by William Wallace, an engineer of that city, 
who estimates the cost at about §1,500, 000. 

Ship building at Vallejo is proving a great 
success. A fine schooner was launched on 
Saturday last for which $32,000 has already 
been offered. 

The Palace hotel will formally open about 
tlte 1st of September next. A hundred miles 
of telegraph wire are in use to connect the 
rooms with the office. 

A joint stock company has constructed 
Bkating rink at Winnemucca. Perhaps, how 
ever, this may not be considered an industrial 
item. 

Sueveyoes are at work on the survey of the 
proposed narrow gauge railroad from Pesca- 
dero to Pigeon Point. J 

The Sacramento sugarie has just erected a 
large two-story building for a distillery and 
potash factory. 

The proprietors of the Marysville foundry 
will soon establish a branch establishment at 
Ghico. 

The California Chemical Paint company has 
increased its stock from $150,000 to $2,000,- 
000. 

A box factory has been' Btarted at Nevada 
Qity. 



Tempting Death.— Every man or woman afflicted 
with a cough or cold, which he or she takes no meas- 
ures to arrest, is tempting death. There is not a drug 
store in the laud where Hale's Honey of fforehound and 
Tar may not be procured, and there is no ailment of 
the lunge or throat tending to consumption or bron- 
chitis, which it is not competent to cure. Do not suffer 
cold to accumulate on cold, but arrest the first symp- 
toms of pulmonary disease, and tone and invigorate 
the breathing organs with this wonderful remedy. 

Pike's Tooth-Ache Drops — Oure in one minute. 



METALS. 

Wednesday m., Jan. 13, 1875. 
The only change given is in Quicksilver, far which 

see table below. 

American Pig Iron, ^ ton @ 46 00 

Scoi-cd Pig Iron.# ton 42 00 Iffl 46 DO 

White Pie, $ ton Si 46 00 

Oregon Pig, % ton ... @ 46 00 

Refined Bar, bad assortment, ^ D> tat — 3 '-. 

Refined Bur, Rood assortment, "£ lb (a, ~ 4 

Boiler, No. 1 to 4 @— 5% 

Plate, No. 5to9 lai — 5& 

Sheet, No. 10 to 15 @— b'i 

Sheet. No. 14 to 20 § — 5S 

Sheet, No. 24 to 27 — 08 @ — 09 

Horse Shoes, per keg 7 50 tat 8 00 

Nail Rod — 10 @ 

Norway Iron — 9 (Si 

Rolledlron .' — 6 «§ 

Other IronB for BlaokBmithB, Minora, eto. & — 4% 

OOPPEB.— 

Braziers' — 31 @ — 32 

Copper Tin'd — 45 @ 

O.Niel'BPat — 50 @ 

Sheathing, j} lb @ — 24 

Sheathing, Yellow a — 25 

Sheathing, Old Yellow.. ® — 12>* 

Oorrposition Nail 3 — 24 @ 

Composition Bolts — 24 @ 

Tin Plates.— 

Plates, Charcoal, IX $ box 13 00 (5)15(0 

Plates, I.OOharooal 13 00 @ 14 50 

Roofing Plates 12 50 @ 15 00 

Banca Ti n, Slabs, # lb . .. — 32f^@ - 33 

Steel.— English Oast, $ lb — 20 (§ — 25 

Anderson A Woods' American Cast @ — 16Jfj 

Drill (5 — 16, 1 * 

Flat Bar — 18 j§ — 2? 

Plow Steel — 9 (5T— 10 

Zing @ — 11 

Zinc, Sheet — <a — 11^ 

Nails— Assorted sizes 4 25 @ 8 00 

Quickbilveb. per ft — — (fi| 1 50 

LEATHER. 

Wednesday m., Jan. 13, 1875. 
This commodity remains steady and the figures are 
unchanged from those of Iaet week's report. 

City Tanned Leatner, # lb...'. 26@29 

Santa Ornz Leather, %J lb 26@29 

Country Leather, % ft 24328 

Stockton Leather, ?4 ft 25@29 

Jodot. 8 Kil., perdoz J50 00@ 54 00 

Jodot. 11 to 19 Kil., perdoz 66 00@ 90 00 

Jodot, second ohoice, 11 to 16 Kil. ^ doz 55 00@ 72 00 

Oornellian, 12 to 16 Ko 57 OOfa) 67 00 

Oornellian Females, 12 to 13 «3 00@ 67 1)0 

Cornellian Females. 14 to- 16 Kil 71 iiO® 76 5f 

Simon Ullmo Females, 12 to 13, Kil 60 00® 63 «0 

Simon Ullmo Females, 14 to 15, Kil 70 una. 72 '0 

Simon Ullmo Females, 16 to 17, Kil 73 00(4 75 00 

Simon, 18 Kil.,% doz 61 00@ 63 i'U 

Simon, 20 KiL & doz 65 00(3 67 00 

Simon. 24 Kil. V doz 72 00® 74 00 

Robert Calf, 7 and 9 Kil 35 00® 40 00 

fc-rench KipB, $ ft 1 00® 1 15 

California Kip, $ doz 40 00®) P H) 

French Sheep, all colors, ^ doz 8 00® 15 00 

Eastern Calf for Backs, $ ft 100® 126 

Sheep Roans for Topping, all oolors, $ doz. ... 9 0U@ 13 00 

Sheep Roans for Linings, 3S doz 5 50® 10 50 

California RoBsett Sheep Linings..... 1 75® 4 50 

Best Jodot Calf Boot LegB, $pair 5 00® 5 25 

Good Fronoh Calf Boot Legs, $ pair ;. 4 00® 4 75 

French Calf Boot Lbrb.$ pair 4 00@ 

HarneBB Leather, "$ ft 30(0) 37»* 

Fair Bridle Leather, <& doz 48 00® 72 00 

Skirting Leather,^ ft 33® 37k 

Welt Leather, » doz 30 00® 50 0o 

Baff Leather, $ foot 17® 

Wax Side Leather, * foot 17® 

Eastern Wax Leather -O™ 



J. D. Yost, Sao Francisco. H. S. Crockeb, Sacramento 



H. S. CE00KER & 00., 



IMPORTING STATIONERS 



General Job Printers. 



401 and 403 Sansome St., S.IF. 



PABTIOULAB ATTENTION PAID TO 



Manufacture of Blank Books. 



BANK AND INSURANCE WORK 

A SPECIALTY. 

23v8-3m-16p 

MACHINISTS' TOOLS, 




Es;tba Heavy and Impeoved Patterns, 
PUTNAM MACHINE CO- r 

Mantjfactubeb. 

LATHES, PLANERS, BORING MILLS, DRILLS, 
BOLT CUTTERS, DOUBLE NUT TAPPING 
MACHINES, SLOTTING AND SHAPING 
MACHINES ON HAND. GEAR 
GUTTERS AND MILLING 
MACHINES A SPEC- 
IALTY. 
Address 

PARKE & LACY, 

310 California Street, S. F. 

Ayer's Sarsaparilla, 

FOB PURIFYING THE BLOOD. 

This compound of the 
vegetable alteratives, Sarsa- 
parilla, Dock, Stillingia and 
Mandrake with the Iodides 
of Potassium and Iron 
makes a most effectual cure 
of a series of complaints 
which are very prevalent 
and afflicting. It purifies 
the blood, purges out the 
lurking humors in the system, that undermine health 
and settle into troublesome disorders. Eruptions of 
the skin are the appearance on the surface of humors 
that should be expelled from the blood. Internal de- 
rangements are the determination of these same humors 
to some internal organ, or orgaus, whose action they 
derange, and whose substance they disease and destroy. 
Ateb's SarsapabilIiA expels theBe humors from the 
blood. "When they are gone, the disorders they produce 
disappear, such as Ulcerations of the Liver, Stomach, 
Kidneys, Lungs, Eruptions and Eruptive Diseases of the 
Skin, St. Anthony's Fire, Rose or Erysipelas, Pimples, 
Pustules, Blotches, Boils, Tumors, Tetter and Salt 
Rheum, Scald Head, Ringworm, Ulcers and Sores, 
Rheumatism, Neuralgia, Pain in the Bones, Side and 
Heaa, Female "Weakness, Sterility, Leucorrhtea arising 
from internal ulceration and uterine disease, Dropsy, 
Dyspepsia, Emaciation and General Debility. With 
their departure health returnB. 

PREPARED BY 

DR. J. C AYEB & CO., Lowell, Mass., 

PRACTICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTS. 

8^" Sold by all Druggists and Dealers in Medicine. 

CBANE & BRIGHAM, "Wholesale Agents 

jyll-sa 




SAN FRANCISCO. 



PA CIFIC MA CH/NERY DEPOT 
H.P.GREGORY 

wSOLE AGENT FOR THE 

'WHEELS 

SAN FRANCISCO 



January 16, 1875.] 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS 



45 



7000 IN USE X 




ADAPTED TO EVERY SITUATION 

■ t 2<?/fr-J//Y 73' / 



:CED.P. BLAKS MFC CO. 



H. P. GREGORY, 

Sole Agent for tho Pacific Coast, Enipiro Warehouse, 
finale street, near Market, Han Francisco, Ou I . 



REMOVAL. 

Pacific Lamp Manufactory. 




2fe «KpXffrQX>"&* 







19v27-eow-16p 



banking and ripapcial. 



Gold, Legal Tenders, Exchange, Etc. 

irorrcctcd Weekly by oharlks Sotbo A Co.] 

Sa* Fbancihco. Thuhbday. Jan. 14. 1875. 

Legal Tkndkuh in s. F., Ua. *.,89 to89'» 

GOLD HutH, Shi). Silver Baku, a i>or rent discount, 
Mexican Dollars, ISand 1 nor com. discount. 

Exchange on S.Y., 6-10 per C«nr. |.n-miuni fnr gold; 
Currency, lb per cent un London— Bankers 49V Com- 
mercial, SO. PatV, S franco per dollar. 

LojfDOK— Conaola. 92.S to STJS; Bonds, 90 T ii; Liverpool 
Wb« tftt. 7,1. to 10-. 6d. * 

yinoxsiLVKB ia S. F., by the flawfe, per ft. $1.50 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Pioneer Land and Loan Association. 

Bank of 8avingsand DepoBit. No 405 California Street, 
Opposite Bank of Ctliiornia. Incorporated, 1869. 
Guarantee Fund, 1200,000/ The Eightieth Dividend 
will be paid on the fith of February. DopositR in Gold, 
Silver and U. S. Currency received, and intercut paid in 
the ttame. Certiflcaten of Deposit and Pass Books is- 
sued, payable at ten days' notice, bearing ten per cent, 
per annum. Ordinary Deposits, payable without no- 
tice, nine per cent, per annum. Term Deposits receive 
twelve per cent. Reports can be obtained at tho Bank. 

This incorporation 18 in its seventh year, and refers 
to over two thousand and one hundred depositors for 
its economical anil successful management, thereby 
securing the full amount of interest earned. No charge 
for entrance fees or pass books. Bank open from 9 
a. m. to 5 r. m. On Saturday evenings until 9. 

Money to loan ou approved securities. 

First-clasn Fire and Burglar-Proof Vaults for the safe- 
keeping of Treasure, Special Deposits and TruBt Funds, 
Bonds, Silverplate, etc. 

H. KOFAHL, Cashier. 

THOS. GRAY, President. 

.7. (J. DUNCAN, Secretary. 3-v29-3m 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

California Savings and Loan Society. 

512 California Street, San Francisco, have declared a 
dividend of nine and Bix-tenths (9 (1-10) per cent, per 
annum on Term Deposit* and eight |8) per cent, per 
annum on Ordinary Deposits, for the half year ending 
3lBt December, 1874, free from Federal Tax, and paya- 
ble on and after Wednesday, Oth January, 1875. By 
order, 
3-v29-lm D. B. CHISHOLM, Secretary. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

San Francisco Savings Union, 532 

California Street, Cor. Webb, for the half year ending 
with December 31st, 1874, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of nine (9) per cent, per annum on Term 
Deposits, and seven and one-half (7!$) per cent, on Or- 
dinary Deposits, free of Federal Tax, payable on and 
after January 13th, 1875. By order, 
3-v29-lm LOVELL WHITE, Cashier. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Bank of the Western Savings and 

TruBt Co., San Francisco, Jan. 4th, 1875. Depositors' 
Dividend — The Directors of this Corporation have this 
day declared the semi-annual dividend, at the rate of 
ten (10) per cent, per annum on Term Deposits and 
eight (8) per cent, on Ordinary Deposits, payable on 
and after January 10th, 1875, at the office of the Bank, 
northeast corner of Post and Kearny streets. 

F. CLAY, 
Vice-President and Cashier. 
H. J. BOOTH, President. 3-v9-lm 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The Farmers' and Mechanics' Bank of 

SAVINGS have declared a Dividend for the half year 
ending December 31, 1874, at the rate of ten per cent, 
per annum on term, eight per cent, per annum on class 
one ordinary, and six per cent per annum on class two 
ordinary deposits, payable on and after January 15th, 
1875. By order G. M. CONDER, Cashier. 
3v9-lm-bp 



GOLDEN STATE IRON WORKS. 

(CO-OPEBATITE.) 

PALMER, KNOX & CO., 

19 to 25 
FIRST STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 

Manttfacturb 

Iron Castings and Machinery 

OF ALL KINDS. 

Stevenson's Patent Mould-Board Pan 

THE BEST TN USE. 

QUICKSILVER FURNACES, CONDEN- 
SERS, &.a. 

Having much experience in the business of the Re- 
duction of Ores, we are prepared to advise, under- 
BtandinRly, parties about to erect Reduction Worjis as to 
the better plans, with regard to economy and utility. 




BETTER THAN MINING STOCK. 

A valuable Patent for sale. No objection to taking 
reol estate in part payment. Residence, Washington 
street on the levee, P.O., Sacramento, 



jan2 bp-tf 



O. A. DAVIS 



AND EXPENSES. 

Men and Women Wanted 

TO SELL OTJB 

KIN Gr IRON. 

Pour Complete Irons in one. Circulars 
and terms sent free. Address S- M. WOODS, 
No- 205 Sansome Street, S. F. 
>t?~State, County and Town rights for sale. 



NIMROD BATJL8IH. 



EICHAUD C. HANSON. 



Riohaed G. Hanson & Co., 
Block and Pump Makers, 

IMPOBXEB9 OP ALL KINDS OF 

Patent Bushings & Gearing Apparatus, 

STEEL FRICTION ROLLERS, 
MINING BLOCKS OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS, 

PRESSED LEATHER FOR PUMPS, 

Lignum Vitas for Mill Purposes. 

NO. 9 SPEAR STREET, 

Near Market, ..... ban francibco. 



Mining and Other Companies. 



Calaveras Hydraulic Mining Company- 
Location of principal place of buxlness, Sun Fran- 
cisco, California. Location of works, Central Hill, 
Calaveras County, California, 

Notice. — There are delinquent upon the following 
described stock, on account of assessment, [No. •!,) 
levied on the 7th day of December, 1874, the several 
iHU'.iintH aet opposite tho names of the respective 
share holders, aB follows: 

Names. No. Certificate. No. Shares. Amount. 

W H Knight, trustee 9 

W a Knight, trustee 61 

CHStover 18 

OH btov.r 16 

H Siover n 

C H H"t, lV er 17 

Q H Bok QV 8 

And In accordance with law, and an order of the 
Board of Directors made on the 7th day of December, 
1874, so many shares of each parcel of such Btocfe un 
may be imcehsary will be st>ld at public auction at the 
office of the Company, 321 Battery street, San Francisco 
Cal. , ou Monday, tbu twenty-tilth day of January. 1875, 
at 12 o'clock, m, to pay delinquent assessment, together 
with costs of advertising and expenses of sale. 

ABKAU SHEAR, Secretary. 
Office, 321 Battery street, San Francisco, California, 
(office of U. 8. Internal Revenue Collector.) 

Postponement. — The date of payment of assessment 
on the above described stock is ueierred until Monday, 
February 1st, 1875. ABRAM SHEAR, Secretary, 



1875 


103 75 


1875 


9.1 70 


500 


25 00 


500 


35 oil 


500 


25 110 


375 


18 75 


750 


37 50 



California Beet Sugar Company.— Loca- 

tion of principal place of business, San FraticiBCo, Cal- 

fornia. Location of works, Soquel, Santa Cruz County, 

California. 

Notice is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board of 
Directors, held on the 23d day of December. IB?4, an as- 
sessment of Five Dollars per share was levied upon the 
capital stock of the corporation, payable immediately in 
United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the office 
of the Company, 314 California street, San Francisco, Ual. 

Any stock upon which this assessment snail remain un- 
paid on the Jl st day of January, 1875. will be delinquent 
and advertised for sale at public auction, and unless 

Jay men t is made before, will be sold on the 21st day of 
'ebruary, 1875, to pay the delinquent assessment, together 
with costs of advertising and expenses of sale. 

LOUIS i-RANCONI, Secretary. 
Offioe, No. 314 California street, San Franciaou, Cal. 



Electric Mining Company— Location of 

Principal placeof business, San Francisco, Oal. 

Notice — There are delinquent upon the following 
described stock, on account of assessment, lev- 
ied on the twenty-eighth day of November, 1874, the 
several amountB set opposite the names of the respec- 
tive shareholders, as IoIIowb: 

Names. No. Certificate. No. Shares. Amount. 

Geo Hasen 301 

OJRader 303 

C JRader 324 

OJRader 330 

OJRader 331 

C J Rader 332 

T B Wingard Trustee 322 

T B Wingard Trustee 326 

TJB Wingard Trustee 347 

J BHoughton 90 

J B Houghton 91 

J BHoughton 392 

J B Houghton 202 

J BHoughton 314 

Wm R McCaw 348 

John Mullen 158 

aw Malone 56 

GW Malone 87 

GW Malone 58 

G W Malone 59 

GW Malone... 60 

G W Malone 177 

G W Malone 206 

G W Terrill 51 

M Ellsworth 178 

G W Mullen Trustee... 04 

GWMullinTrustee 604 

Mrb Annie Woods 76 

Mrs Annie Woods 131 

Mrs Annie Woods 280 

Mrs Annie Woods 303 

Mrs Annie Woods 318 

Mrs Annie Woods 346 

Herbert Eastwood 102 

Herbert Eastwood 224 

E Wolleb, Trustee 105 

E Wolleb, Trustee 113 

E Wolleb, Truotea 114 

E Wolleb, Trustee 115 

E Wolleb, Trustee 11G 

E Wolleb, Trustee 117 

EWi lleb, Trustee ....118 

U Wolleb, Trustee 119 

E Wolleb, Trustee 121 

E Wolleb, Tru tee 122 

E Wolleb, Trustee 123 

E Wolleb, Trustee 124 

E Wolleb, Trustee 294 

OWClayes 145 

Joseph White 154 

Joseph White 155 

Joseph White 255 

Louisa Thompson 239 

Henrietta Grant 240 

Wm. H. Sharp 163 

Wm H Sharp .• 241 

M. G. Rader 317 

J. B.Weston 183 

J. B.Wewton 308 

J. W. Wesson 257 

J. W. Wesson 313 

And in accordance with law, and an order of the 
Board of Directors, made on the 28th day of November, 
1874, so many shares of each parcel of said Stock as 
may be necessary, will be solu at public auction at the 
salesroom of Maurice Dore k Co., No. 326 Pine Btreet, 
San Francisco, on the 26th day of January, 1875, at the 
hour of 12 o'clock, M. of said day, to pay said delinquent 
assessment thereon, together with costs of advertising 
and expenses of the Bale. 

T. B. WINGARD, Secretary. 
Office— Room 13, No. 318 California Btreet, S. F. 



300 


15 00 


160 


7 60 


1060 


53 00 


300 


15 00 


100 


5 00 


1200 


60 00 


50 


2 60 


100 


5 00 


2825 


141 25 


50 


2 50 


25 


1 25 


11 


2 05 


% 


2!$c 


475 


23 75 


150 


7 50 


750 


37 60 


50 


2 50 


50 


2 60 


50 


2 50 


SO 


2 50 


50 


2 50 


1000 


50 00 


187 


9 35 


609 


25 00 


50 


2 60 


100 


5 00 


150 


7 611 


100 


5 00 


600 


25 00 


550 


27 60 


147 


7 35 


300 


15 00 


tee 


30 00 


50 


2 60 


7 


85 


25 


1 25 


100 


5 00 


100 


6 00 


100 


5 00 


100 


5 00 


100 


6 0C 


100 


6 00 


100 


5 00 


60 


2 60 


100 


5 00 


100 


6 00 


50 


2 5G 


138 


6 9C 


500 


25 00 


250 


12 6C 


250 


12 60 


75 


3 75 


60 


3 0C 


60 


3 0C 


100 


5 00 


15 • 


75 


1700 


85 00 


75 


3 75 


25 


1 ->5 


175 


8 75 


125 


6 26 



Geneva Consolidated Silver Mining Com- 

Eanv. Principal place of business, City and Uounby of 
an Francisco, St. on of California. Location of works, 
Cherry Ureek Mining District, White Pine Oounty, Ne- 
vada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of 
Directors, held on the 2d day of January, 1875. an assess- 
ment o:* twenty cents per share was levied upon the 
capital stock of the corporation, payable immediately, in 
United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the office 
of the Company, Room 14, 302 Montgomery street, San 
Francisco, 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain un- 
onid on the 8th day of February, 1875, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction, and unless pay- 
ment is made before, will be sold on Monday the first das 
of March, 1875, to pay the delinquent assessment, together 
with cosis of advertising and expenses of sale. 

I. T. MILLIKIN, Secretary. 
Office— Room H. No. 302 Montgomery street. S. F. 



Gold Mountain Mining Company— Loca- 
tion of works, Lower Rancherie. Amador County. ' al. 
Notice is hereby Riven, that at a meeting of the Board of 
Trustees of said Company held on the 4th day of January, 
L875, an assessment of twenty-five cents per share was 
levied upon the capital stock of said Company, payable 
immediately, in United States gold coin, to tne Secretary, 
at 116 Leidesdorff street 
Any stacs: upon whioh this assessment shall remain un- 



paid on the 6th day of February. 1875, shall be deemed 
de.limi.uent, and will be duly advertised for sale at public 
auction, and unless payment shall be made before, will 
be acid on Saturday, the 11m day uf February, .875. to 
pay the delinquent assessment t itfcther with costs of 
advertlawfl and exponas of sale. By order of the Board 
of Trustees. 

W. AUGS. KNAPP. Secretary. 
Office,— 116 Leldi'^dortf street, San Francisco. 



'Golden Rule"" Silver Mining Company — 

Location of principal place of business, ban tran- 

cIhco, Cal. 

Notice.— There are delinquent upon the following 
described htock, on account of assessment levied 
on the Mtb day of December, 1874, the several amounts 
set opposite the names of tho respective shareholders, 
as follows: 

Names. No. Certificate. No. Shares. Amount. 

J Werthelmer.TruBtee 1 2ft fl 30 

J Wertheimur, Trustee 2 25 1 26 

J Wertbeiuier. Trustee 3 26 125 

J Werthelmer, Trustee 4 25 I 25 

John P .landers, Trustee.. .. 8-50 2 50 

A Meyer, Trustee lti 6 23 

F A Bortd , Trustee 17 25 125 

John P Sanders, Trustee ... .22 100 6 Ou 

John P Sanders, TrUKtee 28 1U0 5 Oil 

Jacob Suustatt, Trustee. ...,81 20 1 ou 

Jacob bui. stat t, Trubtee 41 40 2 00 

Wm Small. Trustee 42 100 6 0U 

A Meyor, Trustee 68 100 6 19 

A Meyer, Trustee 69 100 6 00 

A Meyer, Trustee 60 100 6 OU 

A Meyer, Trustee 61 100 5 t.w 

A Meyer, Trustee 62 100 6 00 

A Meyer, Trustee 63 100 6 00 

A Meyer, Trustee 64 1U0 6 00 

A Meyer. Trustee 65 1C0 6 00 

A Meyer, Trustee 66 100 6 00 

A Meyer, Trustee 07 100 5 00 

A Meyer, Trustee. ...unissued 11625 581 25 

FUri, Trustee unissued 3375 168 76 

And in accordance with law, and an order of the 
Board of Directors, made on the 15th day of De- 
cember, 1874, so many shares of each parcel of said 
stock as may be necessary, will be sold at public auc- 
tion in front of the office of said Company, 530 Clay 
street, San Francisco, on the 16th day of February, 1875, 
at the hour of 2 o'clock, p. M., of said day, to pay 
delinquent assessments thereon, together with costB 
of advertising and expenses of sale. 

K. WERTHEIMER, Secretary. 
Office. 530 01 ay street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Manhattan Marble Company of California. 

Location of principal place of business. San Francisco 

California, Location of works, Oakland, Alameda 

County/State of California. 

Notice ia hereby given, that at a meeting of the Direc- 
tors, held on the 8th day of January, 1875, an assessment, 
(No. 6) of two dollars per share was levied upon the cap- 
ital stock of tbe corporation, payable immediately, in 
United States gold com, to the Secretary of the company, 
at hie office. Nob. 13 and 15 Fremont street, San Francisco, 
California. 

Any stock up<>n which this assessment shall remain un- 
paid on the 20th day of February. 1875, shall be deemed 
delinquent, and advertised for sale at public auction, and 
unless payment ia made before, will be sold on Saturday, 
tbe 13tn dav of Maich, 1875, at 12 o'clock m., to pay the de- 
linquent assessment, together with costs of advertising 
ana expenses of sale. 

Office— Nos 13 and 15 Fremont street, San Francisco, 
California. 



Martin & Walling Mill and Mining Com- 
pany. Location of principal place of busness, San 
Francisco, Oal. 

Notice. — There are delinquent upon the following 
described Btock, on account of assessment levied on 
tbe seventh day of December, 1874, the several amounts 
set opposite the nameB of tbe respective shareholders 
as follows: 
Names. No. Certificate. No. Shares. Amount. 

Carnell, Richard 50 100 $60 00 

Cox, A P 42 60 25 00 

Cox, A P 48 100 60 00 

Finck, George 63 100 60 00 

Finck, George 64 , 75 37 50 

Gately.M 44 1876 937 60 

Gately, M 45 60 15 00 

Gately, M 51 100 50 00 

Hudgln, John D 11 50 26 00 

Hudgin, John D 12 100 50 00 

Hudgin, John D 13 100 60 00 

Hudgin, JohnD 14 1*0 60 00 

Hudgin, John D 16 100 , 50 00 

Hudgin, JohnD.... 16 100 50 00 

Hudgin, John D 17 100 50 00 

Hudgin, John D 18 100 60 00 

Hudgin, JohnD .' 19 100 60 00 

Hudgin. John D 20 100 50 00 

Hudgin. JohnD 21 100 60 00 

Rapp, Charles 61 25 12 60 

Turnock, Joseph 65 26 12 60 

Tripp, J W 46 100 60 00 

Tripp, J W 66 30 15 00 

Whalen, John 65 900 460 00 

Whalen, John. 69 50 25 00 

Whalen, John 60 100 50 00 

Williams, Robert F 9 1000 500 00 

Wililams, Robert F 22 100 60 00 

Williams, Robert F 26 100 60 00 

And in accordance with law, and an order of tho 
Board of Directors, made on tbe 7th day of December, 
1874, s« il any shares of each parcel of said Btock as 
may be necessary, will be sold at public auction at the 
office of the company, 408 California street, room 16. 
San Francisco, Oal., on the. 23d cay of January, 1876, at 
the hour of 12 o'clock, M, of said day, to pay Baid de- 
linquent assessment thereon, together with costs of 
advertising and expenses of sale. 

J. W. TRIPP, Secretary. 
Office, 408 California street, room 16, San Francisco, 
California. 

Orleans Mining Company— Location of 

principal place of business San Francisco, Oal. Loca- 
tion of works, Grass Vailey Township, Nevada Oounty, 
Oal. 

Notice is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Trus- 
tees held on the ith day of January, 1875. an assessment 
(No. 2) of one dollar ($1) per share was levied upon the 
capital stock of tbe corporation, payable immediately in 
United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the office 
of the Company, Room 8, Jlft California street, San Fran- 
cisco, Oal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain un- 
paid on the 9th day of February, 1875, will be delinquent 
and advertised for sale at public auction, and unles* pay- 
men 1 is made before, will ne sold on TvesUity, the 2d 
day of March, 1875, to pay the delinquent assessment, to 
gether with costs of advertising and expenses of Bale. 

J. F. NESMITH, Secretary. 
Office-Room B, No. 315 California street, S. F. 



Page Tunnel Company.— Location of 

Erincipal place of business, San Francisco. California, 
ocation of work-*, Big Cottonwood District, Salt Lake 

County. Utiih. 

Notice is hereby (riven, that at a meeting of the Direc- 
tors, held on ttffi 12th daV of December, 1874, an assess- 
ment of five cents per share was levied upon the capital 
stock of the corporation, payable immediately in Uoirod 
[states gold coin, to tbe Secretary, ai the office of the 
Company, Room 2, No. 408 California street, San Francisco 
California. ,, 

Any stock upon which this assessment snail remain un- 
paid on the 20th day of January, 1875, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction, and unk-s- pay- 
ment is made before, will be sold on the 20th day of Feb- 
ruary, 1875. to pay the delinquent assessment, together 
with costB of advertising and expenses .of sale. 

JACOB HARDY, Secretary. 

Office, Room 2, No. 408 California street, San Francisco, 
California. dco!9-4t 



46 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



[January 16, 1875, 



jviipipg (lachiiiery. 



the: 

AMERICAN TURBINE WATER WHEEL 




Recently improved and submitted to thorough scien- 
tific tests by JameB Emerson, showing the following 
useful effect of the power of the water utilized, being 

THE HIGHEST RESULTS EVER KNOWN. 

Percentage of part gate, U 60.08; H 69.64; % 78.73 
X 82.53; % 82.90. Percentage of whole gate, 83. H. 
Mr. Emerson Bays: " These are the best aver- 
age results ever given by any Turbine "Wheel 
in ray experience." 

A Bplendidly illustrated descriptive catalogue, or any 
further information desired, furniBhedon application to 

TBEADWEIiL & CO., 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
Sole Agents for the Pacific StateB and Territories. 
18v29-eow-tf 





TEATS' PATENT FUrtWACE 

For Roasting, Desulphurizing, Chloridizing 
and Oxidizing Ores, etc. For the reduction of 
Gold, Silver, Lead and other oreB, saving a larger per- 
centage, at less cost, than any other invention now in 
use. Chloridizing Silver ore more thoroughly, in leBS 
time, with.less fuel, ealt and labor; also roasting Lead 
ore preparatory to smelting, better and cheaper than 
any other invention. The Furnace is bo constructed 
that one man, of ordinary ability, tends five or more 
furnaces; controls them with ease; adding heat or air; 
stopping or starting at will; charging and discharging 
with ease. Also, Patent "Conveying Cooler," for con- 
veying and cooling roasted ores, heating the water for 
amalgamation and the boilers at the same time. Saving 
the large space in mill (covered with brick or iron), 
and the labor of two men per day, exposed to the poiB- 
onoue chlorine gases. Also, Patent Air Blast "Dry 
Kiln," for drying ores direct from the mine of breaker, 
saving fuel and labor heretofore necessary in drying 
ores for dry pulverizing. For description refer to 
Mininq and Scientific Pbebs, No. 18, October 31, 1874. 
For particulars address 

TEATS & BREED, 

No. 12 West Eighth Street, Cincinnati, Ohio 

Circulars, &c, will be furnished, if required. 
18v29-3m 



STEEL SHOES AND DIES 



FOR QU^IT-TZ 

Made by our improved pro- 
oesa. After many years of 
patient research and experiment 
we have succeeded in producing 
STEEL SHOES AND DIES for 
QUARTZ 
MILLS, 
H, which are I 
M unequalled 



MILLS, 





Will wear three times longer than any iron Shoes 

BXJILDERS AND CONTRACTORS 
Of Quartz Mills, Pans, Separators, Concentrators, Jigs, 
Hydraulic Rock Breakers, Furnaces, Engines, BoilerB 
and Shafting, and general Mining Machinery in [all its 
details and furnishers of Mining Supplies. 
All orderB promply filled. 

MOEET & SPERRY, 

88 Liberty street, N; Y. 
Examination solicited. 9v28.1y 



PARKE & LACY, 

SOLE AGENTS FOR THE 

Burleigh Eock Drill ComDany. 



—aiAMUFACTURERB OF— 



PNEUMATIC DRILLING MACHINES, 

AIE COMPEESSOBS AND OTHER MACHINERY. 



Also, Farmers' Dynamic Electric Machine and 

Hill's Exploders for IBlasting, Putnam la- 

^chine Company's Tools, Wright's Steam 

Pumps and Haskin's Engines. 

Address 



PABKE «fc LACT, 

310 California St.. S. F. 



1 V 

■H a 

00 o 

2 ft 

o 

£ si 



M - 

2 co 

S 3- 



s aa 

I?-? 

sE'd 



4. 






3H 



tH d sh 2 S 5 2 a S ° Q 2 



5 o o bcoNcos , S vl '^£ 

sSjBslg.^a'gS&i 
r"s- ? »ssf'5sg&-: 

if l*E?it? I il' 



is* 



Cc 

5' 5' 



,1 c c- ■- 7. 1; J- 



*feMH 









W»0O r- 

ai-njiit-OHh- 



IMHIOOI-'KKIOICI 



W-C.l." 



Fl W IO ■ OUHUlOO 



nccsocoiMo- ub'jctivj 



EAGLE IMPROVED CHL0RINIZING AND 
DESULPHURIZING FURNACE. 

(Patented July, 1873.) 



its j&a 




The Cheapest and Most effective Furnace now in use 
Parties desirous of building above furnace, or for any 
information on same, addresB, 

I. T. TVTTT .LIKEN, 

a31 No. 302 Montgomery St., room No. 14, S. F. 



CROCKER'S PATENT 

TRIP HAMMER QUARTZ BATTERY. 




ThiB machine 1 , complete, weighs 1.500 Idb. Has an iron 
riiuie, live steel arms with stamps weighing 17 lbs. each, 
which strike 2.0tt) blows per mimue, 111 a mortar provided 
with screens on both sides, and crushes pine 606 lbs. per 
hour, requiring one-horse power to drive it. Has been* 
thoroughly tested, and it) guaranteed to give goud satis- 
faction. PRICE, $000. 

G. D. CROCKER, 
17v26-tf 315 California street, San Francisco, 



Stamp Mill For Sale at Ophir Canon, 

Nye County, Nevada. Midway between Austin and 
Belmont, belonging to the Twin River Consolidated 
Mining Ooa A complete mill, comprising twenty(20) 
8001b stamps, (dry-crush inc) with Rock Breaker, Pans, 
Settlers, and entire outfit of milling appliances; 
together with an excellent engine (18x42) , two tubular 
boilers and all requisite shafting, gearing, belting, &c; 
vaaluable lot of Sierra Nevada timber in Battery 
frames and building. The whole is offered cheap. For 
further information applv to J A3. D. HAGUE, 
17v28-3m 240 Montgomery St., S, F 



TO COPPER SMELTERS, BLUE-STONE 

& SULPHURIC ACID MANUFACTURERS. 



For sale or to lease the LEVIATHAN COPPER MINE, 
in Alpine county, California. 

The ore, which is in the form of silicate, black and 
red oxide, and gray sulphide, with metallio copper 
finely disseminated, averages from two to five feet 
thick, and 16 to 50 per cent, copper. A few parcels 
taken out during exploratory operations, realized $30,- 
000 for Bluestone. In sight, 2,000 tons 20 per cent, ore; 
on dump, 300 tons 16 percent. Supply inexhaustible. 
Title perfect. Minimum present capacity, 10 tons per 
day-, which may be extended indefinitely. Cost of ex- 
traction, $2. There is also a stratum of sandstone 20 
feet in thickness, Impregnated with 26 per cent, pure 
sulphur. To a coin purchaser highly advantageous 
terms will be offered. For further particulars apply to 
Leurs Chalmers, Silver Mountain, Alpine county, Cal. 



Diamond Drill Co. 

The undersigned, owners of LESCHOT'S PATENT 
for DIAMOND -POINTED DRILLS, now brought to the 
highest Btate of perfection, are prepared to fill orders 
for the IMPROVED PROSPECTING and TUNNELING 
DRILLS, with or without power, at short notice, and 
at reduced prices. Abundant testimony furnished of 
the great economy and successful working of numerous 
machines in operation in the quartz and gravel mines 
on this coast. Circulars forwarded, and full informa- 
tion given upon application. 

A. J. SEVERANCE & CO. 

Office, No. 315 California street, Rooms 16 and 17. 
24v26-lf 



[Machinery. 



Pacific Machinery Depot ! 

H. P. GREGORY, 
Empire Warehouse, 

Beale street, near iVEti-rltet, 

San Francisco, Cal. 




Sole Agent for Pacific Coa6t for 
J. A. Fay & Co's Woodworking 1 Machinery, 
Blake's Patent Steam Pumps, Tanite 
Co's Emery Wheels and Machinery, 
Fitchburg Machine Co's Machin- 
ists' Tools, Edson's Recording 
Steam Gauge, Triumph Fire 
Extinguisher. 
Also on hand and for Sale: 
STTJRTEVANT'S BLOWERS AND EXHAUST FANS/ 
JOHN A. ROEBLING'S SONS' WIRE ROPE, PURE 
OAK TANNED " LEATHER BELTING, PEBIN'S 
FRENCH BAND SAW BLADES, PLANER 
XNINES, NATHAN Sl DREYFUS GLASS . 
OILERS, AND MILL AND MINING SUP- 
PLIES OF ALL KINDS. 
P. 0- Box 168. 



STEAM ENGINES AND BOILERS 

Of all sizeB— from 2 to 60-Horse power. Also, Quartz 
Mills, Mining PumpB, Hoisting Machinery, Shafting, 
Iron Tanks, etc. For sale at the lowest prices by 

JOv27tf J. HENDY, No. 32 Fremont Str«et, 



SWEEPING DREDGE, 

A NEW AND VALUABLE 

CALIFORNIA INVENTION, 

Has been very lately well proven by per- 
forming- a job of dredging- at the mouth of 
San Antonio Creek, at Oakland, Cal. 

There 1b but this one machine that has ever had these 
improvements employed. It is an old machine, for- 
merly built for another device, and is unfavorably con- 
structed for Ball's improvements; yet this first tempo- 
rary experimental machine has filled a scow of eighty- 
five cubic yards in sixteen minutes in unfavorable dig- 
ging. For durability, digging hard material and fast 
work, it has a reputation {supported by leading engi- 
neers) as having no equal. 

Testimonials and references will be given on appli- 
cation to the inventor, who is the sole owner of patents 
(excepting having made an assignment of the one ma- 
chine now belonging to the Central Pacific Railroad 
Company) Having resolved not to seU any rights 
unless upon a basis of actual work performed by a 
machine built by myself for the purpose of fairly es- 
tablishing the worth of the invention, I therefore offer 
to sell machines or rights on the following plan, which 
is warranting the capacity of the machine by actual 
work : 

I will enter into an agreement with any responsible 
party to build and Bell a machine, scows and tender, 
all complete, and right of all my improvements in 
dredging machines throughout the Pacific CoaBt for 
$2u,0G0, warranting the machine to dredge Bix cubic 
yards per minute (to fill a scow at that rate) . $20,000 
will but little more than pay the cost of building the 
machine, scowb, etc., all complete; therefore I am pro- 
posing to aBk nothing for my patents unless my machine 
dredges more than six cubic yards per minute. But 
it shall be further agreed that in case (at a fair trial to 
be made within a stated time) the machine shall fill 
a bcow at the rate of more than six cubic yards per 
minute, then $10,000 shall be added to the price above 
stated for each and every Buch additional cubic yard 
tbuB dredged per minute, and for additional fractions 
of a cubic yard thus dredged in the same ratio the 
$10,000 is to be added to said price above stated. 

I will sell any other Territorial or State rights (either 
United States or Foreign) upon the Bame plan and at a 
lower price proportionately than the rights for the 
Pacific Coast. 

I will sell a single machine with bcows and all com- 
plete, and right to use the same in a limited territory, 
for $20,000 on the same plan as above stated, but will 
add only $2,000 to each additional yard over the six 
cubic yards per minute. Each machine is not to em- 
ploy more than two 10x20 inch engines. 

Payments to be made in U.S. gold coin on delivery 
of machine, as may be indicated by agreement. 

Address, JOHN" A. BALL, 

9v28-tf Oakland. 



January 16, 1875.] 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



47 



California Planers and Matchers, and Wood Working Machinery of all Kinds, 

For Sale at TREADWELL & Co- Machinery Depot, San Francisco. 




Tbu CaUFokma PlaNKI. AND Mvivmn in got- 
ten up from new patterns specially for this 
Coast. It hu Cant st.-t-i si-.-ttt-a Cyllndt r Bead, 
running Id pat.- in telf oiling boxes; Matcher 
BplndjWl tJSu Of the beat cant tttwl. The U earn 
are all prc-tvctwl with Iron cover*. Will plane 
'.'l In. wi>le ami 6 in. thick, and tongue and 
groove 14 in. wide. Will make rustic 
and otir-k nutters, or heavy mouldings, etc., and 
la the beat Job Machine ever built 

WWr have alwayM on hand a larg« assort- 
uii at ol Planing siiii Haobinery, all of the latest 
InipriivtiiiH'utM, Including I'Imihth, Moulding. 
Morticing and Tenoning Uaohlnea, itaud and Jig 
8awa, &c, d:c. Send for Catalogues and prices. 

TREADWELL & CO., 

19-eow-tf San Francisco. 



Adjustable Saw Guage 
Foot Power 






inipiovBa c>a.w Arbors. 



2M3&X.-V, 



Jisr Saws- 



Improved Baud Saws. 



uLJL_JL_IL_fL_IU 

Planer Knives of all sizes on hand. 




Iron ajid Machine tork&. 



San Francisco Boiler Works, 

123 and 128 Beale Street SAN FRANCISCO 

E>. I. CURRY. 

Late Foreman o< the Vulcan Iron Works,) Proprietor 




High and Low Pressure Boilers of all 
Descriptions. 

BOLE MANUFA0TDBEK8 OF THE CELEBRATED 
SPIRAJL. BOILER. 

SHEET IKON WORK of every description done 
■t the Shortest Notice. 

All kinds of JOBBING and REPAIRING promptly 
attended to. 17v25.3m 

THE BISDON 

Iron and Locomotive Works, 

INCORPORATED APRIL 30, 1868. 

CAPITAL *1,00U,0IX>. 

LOCATION OF WORKS: 
Corner of Beale and Howard Streets, 

BAN FHANOISCO. 

Manufacturers of Steam Engines, Quartz and Flour 
Mill Machinery, Steam boilers (Marine, Locomotive 
and Stations, y ) , Marine Engines (High and Low Pres- 
sure) . All kinds of light aud heavy OastingB at lowest 
prices. Cams aud Tappets, with chilled faces, guaran- 
teed 40 per cent, more durable than ordinary iron. 
Directors : 

Jesse Holladay, 0. E. McLane, 

Wm. H. Taylor, J. B. Haggin, 

James D. Walker. 

WM.H. TAYLOR President 

JOSEPH MOOUE... Vice-President and Superintendent 

LEWIS R. MEAD Secretary 

24vl7-qy 



FULTON 

Foundry and Iron Works. 

HINCKLEY & CO., 

MXOCJFiOTOHkCHS Or 

STKA.M ENGINES, 

£aartz, Flovur and. ©aw Mills, 
tyea' Improved Steum Pump, Krodle'a Im- 
proved Crusher, Mlnlnu Pomps, 

,A mnl|fitm«.fari r and all L.1 nd* 
of Machinery, 

N. E. corner of Tehama and Fremont streets, above How. 
■treet. Baa Francisco, • 3-Q.Y 



Joseph Moore, 
Win. N orris, 



Improved Cast and Forged Steel Shoes and Dies for Quartz Mills. 

[PATENTED MAY 2GTH, 1874.] 
Price Reduced to 16 Cents Per Pound. 

San Fhanctbco, November 10th, 1874. 
To Supts. of Quartz Mills and Mining Man generally: 
We take pleasure in stating that owing to the rapid 
jl increase in our orders, our Fit'sburg Manufacturers 
_,^J r itfr'[j!!if have been compelled to add largely to their works — 
a new gas furnace and heavier trip hammer — and are 
thus enabled to reduce the coBt of r-teel and at the 
Banie 1 1 mi' produce Shoes and Dies superior to any yet 
manufactured. We have consequently reduced the 
price to 16 cents per pound and solicit a trial order, 
guaranteeing that vou will find them at least 10 per 
cent- cheaper than the best iron. There are no Steel 
Shoes and Dies made excepting under our patent and 
sold at this office, or by our authorized agents, though 
certain Eastern manufacturers advertise Steel Shoes 
and Dies which are only cast iron hardened by the 
addition of a composition. They will not out-wear two 
sets of common iron, though called steel. They are 
very brittle and are n>»t capable of being tempered, 
flying from under the hammer like cast iron. Our 
Steel Shoes and Dieb are in Ur-e in many of the largest 
mills on the Pacific Ooast, and all who have tried them 
pronounce them cheaper and far superior to iron in 
every respect, even at the old price of 20 cents per 
pound Their advantages over iron are cheapneBB on first 
cost, increased crushing capacity, time saved in chang- 
ing and in setting tappets, increa"e3 value of amalgam 
by absence of iron dust and cblppingB, and a saving of 
75 per cent, in freight. It tabes 60 days to fill orderB 
from the manufactory East. Price 16 cents per 
pound shipped at San Francisco. Terms liberal, 
with dimensions, to 




J 75 per cent, in freight. It takes 50 days 
.{SjjSjpH ^^ from the manufactory East. Price 

^ — ~~~^ pound shipped at San Francisco. Term 




gteam himp?. 



PARKE & LACY, 

310 California street. San Francisco 



AddreBS all orders. 



CAST STEEL SHOE & DTE CO., Boom 1, Academy Buildingr.S- E- 



PACIFIC 

Rolling Mill Company, 

SAN FRANCISCO, OAI>. 

Established for the Manufacture of 

RAILROAD AND OTHER IROvsl 

— AMD — 

Every Variety ol SsSnatftings, 

Embracing ALL SIZES f 
■St -mn bout Shafts, Crunk a, Piston and Com. 
i nectlng; Rodi,Ourand Locomotive Axles 
and Frames 

— ALSO — 

HAMMERED IltON 

Of every description and slzft 

<&- Orders addressed to PACIFIC ROLLING MILL 
COMPANY. P. O. box 2032. San Francisco, Oal„ will r«- 
ccive prompt, attention. 

oir The highest price paid for Sorap Iron. 

SHEET IRON PIPE. 

THE 

Risdon Iron and Locomotive Works 

Corner Howard and Beale Streets, 

Are prepared to make SHEET IRON AND ASPHALTUM 
PIPE, of any Bine and for any pressure, and contract to 
lay the same where wanted, guaranteeing a perfect 
working pipe with the leaBt amount of material. 

Standard sizes of railroad Oar Wheels, with special 
patterns for Mining Care. These small wheels are made 
of the beBt Car Wheel Iron, properly chilled, and can be 
fitted up with the improved axle and box— introduced by 
this company, and guaranteed to outlaBt any othei 
wheels made in this State. 

»y All kinds of Machinery made and repaired. 



UNION IRON WORKS, 
Sacramento. 

ROOT, NEILSON & CO., 

MAHOrAOTDSBBfl OP 

STEAM ENGINES, BOILEBft 



Dunbar's Patent Self- Adjusting Steam Piston 

PACKING, for new and old Cylinders. 

And all kind* of Mlnlnif Machinery. 

front Street* between N and O streets, 

gAOBAUXNTO OlTY. 



24v22-3m 



JOSEPH MOORE, Superintendent. 



OCCIDENTAL FOUNDRY, 

137 and 130 First Btreet SAN PRANOISO O 

STEIGER & BOLAUD, 
IK03V POUNDERS. 

IRON CASTINGS of all descriptions at short notice. 

Sole manufacturers of the Hepbujcn Rolling Pan 
aud Callahan Grate Bars, suitable for BurninR 
Screenings. 

Notice.— Particular attention paid to making Supe- 
rior Shoes and Dies. 20v26.3m 



The Phelps' Manufacturing Co., 

(Late S. 3 1 . Screw Bolt Works. 

MA2TOFAOTUBEB8 OF ATiI, KINDS OF 

Machine Bolts, Bridge Bolts, and Ship or 
Band Bolts. 

13, 15 and 17 Drnmm Street, San Franoisco. 4v241j 



CALIFORNIA BRASS FOUNDRY, 

tim. 1JW5 First street, opposite Allnna, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

all kudb of Brass, Composition. Zinc, and Babbit tM eta 
Castings, Brass Ship Work of all kinds, Spikes. Sheathing 
Nails, Rudder Braces, Hinges.Ship and Steamboat Bollsana 
Gongsof superiortone. Ail klndsof Cocks and Valves, Hy 
draulic Pipes and Nozzles, and Hose Couplings and Connec- 
tiona of all sizes and patterns, furnished with dispatch 
as- PRICES MODERATE. -€» 
J. H '"FFH. V. rTTNCWWI.T, 



G. W. PlU.SCOTT. 



I 



W. R. Eckabt. 



Marysville Foundry, 



MARYSVILLE, ____-__-- OAL. 

PBESCOTT & ECKART, 
Manufacturers of Quartz and Amalgamating Machinery, 
lloisinc Machinery, Saw mid Grist Mill Irons, Honse 
Fronts. Car Wheels, and Castings of every de- 
scription made to order. 
Steam Engines constantly on hand for sale. 9v'2rMy 



California Machine Works, 

119 BEALE STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

BIRCH, ARGALL & CO.. 

Builders of QUARTZ, SAW AND FLOUR MILLS 

Keating' s Sauk Printing; Presses, 

The Economy Htdkaulic Hoist fok Stones, 

And General Machinists. 25v28-3m 






Miners' Foundry and Machine Works, 

CO-OPERATIVE, 

First Street, bet. Howard and Folsom, San Francisco 

Machinery and CasfcinorH of* nil Mnrta. 



McAFEE, SPIERS & CO., 

BOILER MAKERS 

AND GENERAL, MACHINISTS, 

Howard fit., between Fremont and Beale, San Francisco 



THEODORE BALXENBEROr. 
MACHINIST, 

and Maker of ModelB for Inventora. All kinds of Dies 

Stamps and Punches made. Also, all kinds of 

Small Gears Cut. 

Repairing done on very Reasonable Terms and In thy 

best' manner. No. 32 Fremont Btreet, S. F. 1Qv2H-Atv 



Vallejo Foundry and Machine Works, 

VALLEJO, OAL. 

JOHN L. HEALTJ, Proprietor. 

Manufacturer of Flour and Saw Mills. Stationary 
and Portable Steam Engines, Pumps, etc. Boilers 
built and repaired, and all kinds of Iron and Brass 
Castings furnished at Bhort notice. 



THOMPSON BROTHERS, 
EUREKA FOT/NDBY, 

12H and 131 Beale street, between Mission and Howard. 

San Frsncisco. 

UttHT AM> HEAVY CASTINGS, 

of every description, manufactured. ( 2*vl8or 




THE SELDEN 

DIRECT-ACTING STEAM PUMP, 

A. CARR, Manufacturer & Proprietor. 

Patented 




Combining simplicity and durability to a remarkabla 
degree. ItB partB are easy of access, and it iBadapted to 
all purposes for which Steam Pumpn are used. 

As a Mining Pump it is Unsurpassed. 

—ALSO — 

STEAM. GAS & WATER PIPE, BRASS WORK STEAM 
k, WATER GAUGES, FITTINGS, ETC. 

CARE PATENT STEAM RADIATOR. 

Send for Price List and Circulars. Address, 

10v28-ly 48 Courtland Street , New York 



BLACK DIAMOND FILE WORKS. 




«i. &. ill. BABNETT, 

Manufacturers of Files of every Description 

Nob. 89, 41 and 43 Richmond Btreet, 
Philadelphia, Fa. 

Sold toy all the principal hardware stores on th 
Pacific Ooast. 18v26.1y 



Brittan, Holbreok & Co., Importers of 

Stoves and Metals. Tinners' Goods. Tnols and Machines; 
111 and 11- California St., 17 and 19 uavio St., San tfran- 
oieoo. and 178 J St. Sacramento. mr.-Iy 



48 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS 



[January iG, 1875.J 



(A 
O 

o 

m 



"g 

eS 



21 Hi tunm^mm 



THE "HOADLEY" PORTABLE STEAM ENGINE. 



*sUh 1* If ^s .assess all 







iWi 



'-:-. ~- a 



m.p 



P 



(A s 
U 



§ .= 



"S - ^ Mo m" « * £ £ a a "S B, „ ». . . --: - - - 

" — T S JS _ 3 ES » 
: ft O ft « 5 a- 

& .2 % g * & e * 5 .2 1 s w 



*sj 



r^oo—S^Po gfcn tac 



3 £3,! 
^^fS ft£^ ~ 



g §1 atlg &I.s ISs =-£S3ift-i.&S 

ii 





Tlie above cuts represent the new style "HOADLEY" variable cutoff 16 Horse-Power Portable Engine. We have same etyle and Fize mounted 0* 
whi-els ne a Threshing Engine for the Kutsell End-shake Separator. We have all sizes from 3 to 40 horse-power on hand. The HOADLEY ENGINES need- 
no recommendation from us. We have sold them in California for 20 years, and every year has added to their improvements. The last great improve- 
ment is the Cut-off Governor, thus giving them all the economy and increased power of the most thorough built stationary engine. 

B^Millmen, Mine-owneYs and Mininsr Superintendents, and all who intend buying engines, will do well to examine carefully the merits of thti 
" HOADLEY " before purchasing. Circulars and prices sent free on appplicatiou. Address 

TREADWELL & CO., San Francisco. 



Eandol and Wright's Quicksilver Purifying Apparatus. 

Fot Description see Mining and Scientific Press, November 7th, 1874. 




Patented November 25th, 1873. 

RANDOL AND FIEDLER'S QUICKSILVER CONDENSERS. 

MADE OF 'WOOD AND GLASS. 

Patented July 28th, 1874. See Mining and Scientific Pbess, September 19th, 1874. 

FIEDLER'S QUICKSILVER CONDENSERS, 

MADE OF IKON. 

Patented February 24th, 1874. See Mining and Scientific Pbebs, November 15th, 1873. 
For plans and rights to use, address 
21v29-16p-eow-3m F. FIEDLER, New Almaden, CeA 



G-IANT POWDEE.. 

Patented May 3rt. 1868. 

THE ONLY SAFE BLASTING POWDER IN USE. 

GIANT POWDEB, NO. 1, 

For hard and wet Rock, Iron, Copper, etc., and Submarine Blasting. 

GtXAlVT POWDER, ISO. S 9 

For medium and seamy Rock, Lime, Marble, Sulphur, Coal, Pipe Clay and Gravel Bank Blasting, Wood, etc. 
Its EXCLUSIVE use saves from 30 to 60 per cent, in expenses, besides doing the work in half the tune 
required for black powder. 

iff- The only Blasting Powder used in Europe and the Eastern States. 

BANDMANN, NIELSEN & CO., 
v92-3m1flT> ; General Agents, No. 210 Front Street. 



STURTEVANT 

BLOWERS & 

PACIFIC MACHINERY DEPOT 
H.P.GREGORY 

SAN FRANCISCO 



PAGWC MACti/tiERY DEPOT 
H P GREGORY 

SOLE AGENT 

FITCHBUR6 MACHINE C os 

MACH I MISTS' 



SAN FRANCISCO 



THE PACIFIC 

REDUCTION WORKS. 



GUIDO KUSTEL, 



Superintendent. 



WILIi PURCHASE GOLD AND SILVER BEARING ORES, CUPERIFEROTJS SILVER) 

ORES, SOLD SULPHURETS, ETC., AT THE HIGHEST RATES, OR WORK 

THE SAME. FOR ACCOUNT OF OWNERS. 

Office, 310 Front Street, (*mv Francisco. 

4v29-6m-16p- 



1874. A GRAND SILVER MEDAL. 1874. 



HASKfWS 



^EMI-PORTABL,^., 



I 5 

° 7) 

9 w m 

at— 1 



a a _ 

_s £ r 

£ ° 

> S o 

* 8 © 

S- ft > 

2 CD 

5 3. 

•09 CO 

o 

O 



The highest and only prize of its class given to any 
Vertical Engine was awarded to the 

HASKINS ENGINES AND BOILERS, 

BY THE 

MASS. CHARITABLE MECHANICS' ASSOCIATION, 

at their Fuir in Boston, in competition with the 

Baxter, New York Safety Steam Power 
and the Sharpley Engines- 



PACIFIC MACHV DEPOT 

GUARANTEED PURE OAK TANNED 

LEATHER 
BELTING 

HP GREGORY 

■-■■,"■.■- SAN FRANCISCO 



MAGAZINES. 


P. An. 


W. E. L00MIS, 
News Dealer 

AND STATIONER, 

8. E. corner of Sansomc r.nd 

Washington streets, 

flUPPLrES ALL 

Eastern Perodicals 

BY THE 

Year, Month, or Numb 


EI r*S 


$4 00 

3 00 

5.00 

6 00 
15 00 














Literary Album 

Lrmdon Society. 

AH the Year Round .. 



N. W. SPAULDINQ, 

Saw Smithing and Repairing 

ESTABLISHMENT. 

Noa. 17 and 19 Fremont Street, near Market 









MANTJFAOTUBEB OP 



SPAULDING'J* 

Patent Tooth Circular Saws 

They have proved to be the most dn able and economi 
cal Saws in the Wond. 

Each Saw is Warranted in every respeot 

Particular attention paid to construction of 

Portable & Stationary Saw Mills 

MILLS FURNISHED AT SHORT NOTICE 
At the lowest Market Prices. 



Miners write for your paper. 



W. T. GAEBATT. 

CITY A 

Brass and Bell Founder, £» 

Corner Natoma and Fremont Streets 

HANTTTACTUJIEHS OF 

Brass, Zino and Anti-Priction or Babbet Meta 

CASTINGS, 

Church and Steamboat Bells, 

T 1TEKN AND LAND BELLS, GO\ti» 
FIRE ENGINE3, FORCE AND LIFT PUMPS. 

Steam, Liquor, Soda, Oil, Water and Flange Oocb 
and Valves of all descriptions, made and repairer 
Hose and all other Joints, Spelter, Solder and Ooj 
per Rivets, etc. Gauge Cocks, Cylinder Cocks, 
Globes, Steam Whistles. HYDRAULIC PIPES AN 
NOZZLES for mining purposes. Iron Steam Pipe fa 
nished with Fittings, etc. Coupling Joints of all size 
Particular attention paid to Distillery Work. Manunv 
turer of " Garratt's Patent Improved Journal Metal." 

«^-HigheBt Market Price paid for OLD BELLS, CO] 
PER and BRASS. 6-tf 




An Illustrated 



BY I>KWKA' »%t CO. 
Patonl Soltcltm'H, 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY. JANUARY 23, 1875, 



VOLUME 2KXX 
Number 4. 



Improved Pinking Iron. 

This is ad ingenious arid handy substitute 
for the oU-fashiound sinkiug iron, or one 
under which the cloth is usually laid and the 
cutting done by pounding on the end of the 
tool with a hammer. 

The present invention is nothing more than 
two cutting blades, of any desired form, at- 
tached to levers which are jointed like pincers 
and are operated like scissors. The upper 
blade does the cutting, and the lower one is 
made to correspond to it in shape, having its 
edge m ade, however, by beveling one side 
only. Both are so constructed that, when the 
jaws are closed, the edge of the upper blade 
sinks slightly below the surface of the lower 
tool and jnst back of the same, so that at each 
stroke the beveled parts of the blades bear 
against each other, and the cutting edge 
strikes against nothing but the fabric. 

Of course the dies or blades are varied in 
form for different patterns, but it is considered 
cheaper to have an entirely separate instrument 
for every pattern instead of providing detach- 
able blades. 

For further particulars regarding sale of 
Btate rights, etc., address the inventor, Mrs. 
Eliza P. Welch, Groton, Caledonia county, 
Vt. 

Some one might make a profitable invest- 
ment, by purchasing the ri^ht to the Pacific 
Coast, of the above iron which evidently will 
be a very useful article. 



Hydraulic Mining in California. 

3So. 9. 

Tbe caved material is washed into the sluice 
boxes, good care being taken that an even flow 
is maintained and that the boxes are not over- 
charged. Pieces of hard gravel, clay, etc., too 
large to be washed through the sluice boxes, 
must be reduced to smaller fragments, by either 
the pick or the blast. For all Buch material as 
can be perforated by the chum-drill or auger, 
the process of blasting with giant powder No. 1 
is considered the cheapest and most effective. 
Rocks and bowlders, too large to be sent down 
by the sluice boxes, must be first broken up. 
It is to be presumed that as yet room is want- 
ing to stack them in piles on the ground. 

When sufficient clearance has been made to 
leave ample space for the deposition of heavy 
bowlders, tree stumps, and other rubbish, either 
i derrick, or wheelbarrow, or cars can be em- 
ployed to remove such objects to the place of 
deposit. Even with abundance of room it will 
be advisable to go systematically to work and 
keep certain order in the arrangement. This 
plan will accustom workingmen to dispose at 
once of auy incumbrances for good and at the 
right place, aud will save ar.reit deal of work 
in the long run. 

In working a hydraulic mine it must be the 
aim to secure as soon as possible a large open 
front, so as to occupy two, three, or more hy- 
draulic nozzles, according to the supply of 
water and general capacity of the works. 

These different hydraulic nozzles, being sup- 
plied from the same distributer, can open a 
"cross fire" upon any point within 200 feet 
from the nozzles and thus do excellent execu- 
tion. 

Should the surface of the gravel deposit be 
covered by a growth of brush-wood or trees it 
will be necessary to remove this material by 
cutting it down and hauling it off the ground, 
or piling it up and setting fire to it. 

Bank Blasting. 

This is resorted to either when the gravel de- 



posit is so hard that it will not readily yield to 
the jet, or wh-n the gravel bank is so high that 
the nydraulic nozzle cannot with safety, (on 
account of caving) be brought close enough to 
do good execution. The blasts may either be 
placed in drifts with one or more cross drifts, 
(T,) or in shafts with a cross-driftin the bottom, 
(it) or JB shafts with a wider bottom (in the 
shape of a bottle, the shaft forming the neck of 
the bottle.) The latter are generally used to 
blow up patches of bottom gravel. The quan 
tity of powder used depends necessarily on the 
quality and extent of the ground to be blown 
up, and varies from a few kegs up to two 
thousand. Even larger blasts have been and 
will be made, as occasion requires. A keg of 
powder contains 25 pounds. 

When a bank is from 80 to 100 feet high the 
main drift should be 100 feet long, so that a 
reasonable proportion may exist between the 
resistance offered by the top pressure and the 
lateral or front pressure. Thus a general up- 
heaval results, aud neither a blowing out of the 
front nor a partial blowing up of the top. The 



from the mouth of the main drift, each arm 
being 30 feet long. We flh'Ul thus have the 
accompanying figure. 

60 feet. B0 feet. 



•200 Kega Powder. 200 Kegs Powder. 



100 Kegs. 



This blast fired by an electrical apparatus 
and ignited simultaneously at twelve or sixteen 




WELCH'S PINKING IRON. 



main drift should be three feet wide and four 
feet high, or as small as it can be worked. The 
side-drifts or "Ts" can be made a little larger. 




different points, will in all probability dislodge 
and crumble an area of ground, representing 
from fifty to sixty thousand cubic yards. 

The powder should be emptied in long boxes 
placed in the different side drifts, and electric 
fuses should be inserted, at proper distances, 
at least one for every 40 or 50 kegs of powder, 



Fiff- 1, Nitro-GUyoerine Igniter. 

To secure a good effect, it is necessary to use 
about 600 kegs of powder for the blast, placing 
the contents of 400 kegs on the cross-drifts at 
the terminus of the main drift, each arm beine 
from 45 to 50 feet long, and the contents of 200 
kegs in the cross-d'ifts, looated about 65 feet 




Nitro-Glycerine Compounds. 

The invention of combining nitro-glycerine 
with other substances to furnishing a sub- 
stitute for powder in blasting operations 
has been one of great benefit to the 
mining interests. The peculiar property which 
distinguishes this class of substances, is that 
fire may be applied to them without their ex- 
ploding. Nitro-glycerine, if ignited in an open 
space is slowly decomposed with a bluish flame, 
but the fire goes out when the match is with- 
drawn. If a drop is placed on an anvil, the 
blow of a hammer, through the heat developed 
by compression causes it to explode, but only 
that part which has received the blow, so tha t 
the explosion in this case is only a local one. 
A chief point in Noble's inventions consists 
in overcoming this difficulty, and he adopts 
two different methods of promoting its explo- 
sion. The method to be used in blasting, 
where evidence of explosion is of great impor- 
tance, is that by which it is submitted to pres- 
sure, the most rapid source of developing heat. 
There are many means of attaining this im- 
pulse of explosion. 

Some of these are as follows: when nitro- 
glycerine in tubes is surrounded by gun-pow- 
der and vice versa; by an electric current when the 
nitro-glycerine is enclosed on all sides, so as 
not to afford an escape to the gas developed- 
by a capsule; by any chemical agents develop 
ing a gradual heat; simply by a fire; by igni- 
ters. 

These igniters are shown in figure 1 of the 
cuts. They may be equally varied, but in their 
simplest form they consist of a wooden cylin- 
der, hollow inside aud filled with gun-powder, 
being corked at one end and connected wilh a 
fuse at the other. When the nitro-glycerine 
has been poured into tli9 bore, this cylinder is 
let down with its fuse until the former swims 
in the blasting oil; then the upper part of the 
bore is filled with loose sand, and nothing re- 
mains but to ignite the fuse. The fuse in its 
turn fires the gun-powder contained in the 
wooden cylinder, the hot gases of the gun-pow- 
der make their escape and rush in streams 
into the blasting oil. of which they heat a mi- 
nute part; a local detonation takes place, 
which as the oil cannot escape, heats it by 
pressure to about 360 degs., F. when it explodes 
through the whole blast. In the figure re- 
fered to, a a a, shows the work, 6 6, the bore, 
c c, the nitro-glycerine, d d t the wooden cyl- 
inder (igniter), e, the charge of gun-powder, 
/, the cork, g g, the fuse, and h h, the Bhaft of 
loose sand. 

Among other improvements of modes in the 
maunfacture of this compound consists in rap- 
idly mixing the whole relative quantities of 
acids and glycerine, which being led immedi- 
ately into cold water the nitroglycerine sepa- 
rates, being insoluble. The old way was by 
adding glycerine drop by drop to a mixture of 
sulphuric and nitric acid, and taking care not to 
raise the temperature above 32 degrees Fahr, 
In the method of making referred to above, 
where it is mixed at once, is shown in Fig. 2 of 
the engraving. In this a is a tube conducting 
the mixture of nitric and sulphuric acids into 
the mixing tube, c; b is a tube conducting gly- 
cerine into the mixing tube, c. ; c is a mixing 
tube wherein the re-action takes place, and is 
provided with small holes at the bottom, whence 
the mixture of acid aud nitro-glycerine escapes 
into cold water. 



Fiff. 2- Mixer for Acids and Glycerine. 
which would insure the simultaneous ignition 
and complete combustion of the gunpowder 
and develop thus its whole force at once. 

Condensed from an article by Charles Waldeyer, of 
the last Annual Report of the U. 8. Commissioner on 
Mining Sta tistics. 

Foe the year ending January 1, 1875, the 
Eureka mill, on the Carson river, Wm. King, 
Superintendent, reduced 61,100 tons of ore, 
producing, 80,347 pounds of bullion, worth 
$3,435,131.53. The mill contains sixty stamps 
and the adequate amount of amalgamating ma- 
chinery. 



The Mechanics' Aet Lectures. — We had 
prepared a summary of the lecture on the 
"Production of Silver Ores, "delivered on Sat- 
urday evening by Prof. Becker, of the Univer- 
sity of California, but are compelled to leave 
it over until next week for want of space. 

New discoveries continue to be made in Pea- 
vine district, and some of the specimens sent 
to Virginia City give high assays. It is thought 
there will be considerable excitement in that 
vicinity next season. 

The Helena (Montana) Independent, says the 
miners up at Ten-mile quartz mines, in going 
to work, Blide down that shaft on ioioles. A 
nice slide. 



50 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



[January 23, 1875. 



CORRESPONDENCE. 



Jottings from Tybo, Nevada. 

From the Old to the New. 

Editoes Press: — Old Father Time has been 
instrumental in effecting a chronological change 
since my last letter reached the editorial sanc- 
tum of the Press. 1874, feeble and decrepit 
with age, has been borne to the silent chambers 
where calmly repose, the remains of its more 
notable and illustrious predecessors. Its course 
was unmarked by aught of a nature to effect 
the common current of our thoughts, or desert 
them from their everyday ploddings. If there 
have been no great national or physical revo- 
lutions to chronicle during its oareer, we have 
had that given to us which is infinitely better 
and worthier of our attention than either san- 
guinary wars or chaotic revolutions. A meas- 
ure of prosperity has been vouchsafed to the 
people of this coast during its passage greater 
than they have ever before enjoyed. 

Mining and agrioulture have both flourished 
in a manner unprecedented in the annals of 
statistical production; nor have manufacturing 
and other interests been a whit less prosperous. 
The production of bullion has, as we know, 
largely exceeded that of any preceding year, 
and it is certain that the product jof 1875 will 
be still larger. The great bonanza will soon 
begin to pour forth, its long dormant 
treasures, to enrich and stimulate the com- 
merce whose broad sails whiten the waters 
of the Occident, while bearing to its marts 
the rich products of the orient. These riches 
will effectually eclipse by their vastness 
the amounts which have been at various 
periods drawn from the most famous mines 
of either ancient or modern times. The fame 
heretofore so freely accorded to the-Veta Madre 
of Central Mexico, and the San Lnis Potasi, of 
Buenos Ayres, will not any longer be entitled 
to receive the homage of either our admiration 
or remembrance, when we come to recall the 
figures of Mr. Deidesheimer, which are almost 
beyond the capacity of ordinary arithnieticiaus, 
$1,500,000,000 in bullion! No wonder that he 
thought people who saw these figures would be 
inclined to set him down as a crazy man, and 
a fit candidate for Stockton. So much for 
what the old year has done for the Great West; 
and it faded from sight, down the horizon of 
time. "We will now turn to the affairs of the 

Great East. 
And inquire what are its prospects for the year 
which has so auspiciously dawned upon it. 
From every camp within its borders comes the 
most cheering accounts. New mines are every 
day being developed, and old ones long idle, 
are being opened and worked anew, with a con- 
fidence which shows the abiding faith and en- 
terprise of their owners. From 

Eureka 

There is wafted to us news of a very inspiriting 
character, and from its tenor there is every 
reason to believe that the great bonanza will 
not be- allowed to quietly bear off with it all 
the honors to which it now aspires. The vast 
mineral resources of Kuby Hill are not yet 
exhausted. Nuture has lavished her treasures 
with no unsparing hand upon that favored lo- 
cality, and the bullion returns of the three 
companies whose properties cover its surface 
area leaves ample evidence to this fact. Not 
one of these three compauies have since their 
incorporation levied an assessment, and two of 
them, the Eureka Consolidated and the K K 
have paid in hard cash to their stockholders 
dividends aggregating $750,000— the former 
$700,000, the latter, $50,000. The affairs of 
the last named are, however, but indifferently 
managed in San Francisco, otherwise its share- 
holders would have been able to pocket more 
substantial rewards. Such will continue to be 
the case, too, so long as self-interests and the 
narrow policy which they invariably produce 
are considered paramount to the publio good. 
Messrs. Haggin & Tevis have never been ac- 
cused of much liberality toward parties with 
whom they have been associated in mining. 
These two gentlemen at one time in its early 
history controlled and directed the destinies of 
the first named company, and the result of their 
administrations are well known. They also 
control the financial affairs of the K K to such 
an extent that those who know and appreciate 
the mine least, even though seeking cheap and 
profitable investments, will not touch its stock 
so long as they have anything to do with it. 
This apathy of the public is evidenced by the 
fact of its being hardly ever called on change 
nowadays. The third of these companies, 

The Richmond, 
Which, though stocked in London, where sueh 
things are differently managed still maintains its 
prestige in that great mart, being by last advices, 
quoted at $36, and paying the regular divi- 
dend of 37 and 30 per cent, to its lucky share- 



holders. These dates, too, could have been 
materially increased were'its concerns here only 
skillfully managed. But they are not, as the 
sequel would show, were-I, at present, at all 
desirous of undertaking the task of pointing 
out wherein things are, and have been of late, 
mismanaged. The Richmond is, however, a 
great mine, and worthy of the high encomiums 
that are lavished upon it. The amount a bul- 
lion it .produced from the 1st of September, 
1873, to the ending of the. financial year, 31st 
August, 187^4, has been $1,775,000. Out of 
this large sum, there were $375,000 paid for 
charcoal alone, to the people of the Base 
Range; this, and the other expenses leaving a 
net revenue of $455,000, A large proportion 
of these expenses have, however, been debited 
to construction account, for the extensive refin- 
ing works which are in process of erection and 
nearly finished., will absorb no inconsiderable 
sum. The entire cost will be about $80,000. 
But whether they will ever be of any greater 
benefit to the company than the amount of 
oxide of lead which they will give, for smelting 
purposes, is a question which has yet to be 
solved. Experience is a stern teacher, and ex- 
perience will, without I am mistaken, prove 
how fallacious have been the hopes of its pro- 
jector, whose pet scheme it has been all along. 
No matter, it gives evidence of enterprise and 
enlarged views, and will prove ornamental if 
not either useful or profitable. 

The mine is in a very prosperous condition, 
the late strike being the richest and most im- 
portant, as regards size, which has ever been 
made in eastern Nevada. The Richmond is in 
the full zenith of its glory and productiveness, 
and there is every probability tnat it will long 
continue so, too. 

The other mines of Eureka are also doing 
well, and give much future promise, and I 
would gladly particularize them had I time and 
space in which to do it. It is, however, 
enough to say that the prospects are as good, 
if not better, than they have been within the 
memory of the writer. From 

White Pine 
District, distant 45 miles from Eureka, and 80 
miles from Tybo, in a northeasterly course, 
there comes many flatterino; reports. This 
place was, at one time, the Mecca of the hopes 
and aspirations of the thousands, who, like the 
writer, bent their steps toward it in 1868 and 
in 1869. But, however ardent we were at the 
outset, neither the pilgrimage thither, nor the 
experience gained there, proved to be quite as 
consoling in their effects as those which the de- 
vout Mussulman desires from a visit to the 
resting place of the proph> t. It is not, how 
ever, at present, devoid of interest; nor will it 
be, provided Capt. Drake is but as successful 
in tbe'future as he has been in the past. His 
management of the Eberhardt aud Aurora 
company's property during the past four years 
has been marked by sense, judgment, and abil- 
ity of no mean order. These mines have pro- 
duced in that period, a sum equal to $1,835,- 
000, yet the company was at one time brought 
to the verge of bankruptcy, by the neglect and 
inefficiency of its then manager, whom it is 
needless to name. Mr. Edward Applegarth 
was the vendor of this now magnificent^ prop- 
erty to an English company, and he is now 
one of its directors. The company is now out 
of debt, and extracting 50 tons of ore a day, 
valued at sixty dollars ($60X per ton, aud 
at a recent meeting debentures to the amount of 
fifty thousand dollars ($50,000) were subscribed 
for by its members, in order to inaugurate the 
new year's start with full coffers. The news 
from Cherry Creek, Pioche, Patterson, Robin- 
son, Phraranaget, and other places to the east 
and south of here, is of the most cheerful char- 
acter, thus showing that the prospeots for 1875 
are bright and encouraging. 

To come to localities nearer home, I will 
mention 

Rattlesnake Canon, 
Hot Creek district, as the first of them wbioh I 
will notice, because of its greatest proximity to 
Tybo, being only seven miles to the northward. 
Some of ihe leading mines of this camp are 
owned by a New York company, whose supiue- 
ness of late has been a-matter of comment. It 
has, however, not long since again com- 
menced active operations, with a view to push 
developments aheafl. Much headway cannot, 
however, be made until hoisting and pumping 
machinery are supplied, and I am informed 
that these have been already ordered from New 
York. Several of the claims, which were for a 
length of time lying idle, were re-located on 
the 1st instant, by parties' who mean business. 
I have myself received from there withiu the 
past week three samples of milling ore for as- 
aa\ , which I am confident, as are those who 
have seen them, will 'go away up into the hun- 
dreds, and possibly into the thousands. The 

Hot Creek 
District contains many distinctive features of 
curiosity and iuterest. It receives its name 
from a rather singular stream of hot water 
which flows from several boiling springs in the 
neighborhood, which forms a stream of consid- 
erable proportions. It takes its course through 
a chasm in the mountains the walls of which 
rise vertically several hundred feet on each 
side, and flows a distance of a couple of miles 
and disappears suddenly through the sands 
and alkali beds, the same as does all other 
streams of Nevada. The old. 
Milk Spring 
District is situated in the Hot Creek range 45 
imileseastof Belmont and twelve miles south 
of this camp, close to the line of the projected 
Palisade and Colorado railroad. Its geologi- 



-=sm=. 



cal formation is of limestone, in which occurs 
the silver-bearing veins, whose course is north- 
west and southeast, and dipping, like here, to 
the east at an angle of 60 deg. ' 

Comparatively little has been done toward 
the- development of its mines, yet they have 
been sufficiently opened to prove them true fis- 
sure veins. The district is, however, about to 
be re-baptised in consequence of some new and 
important, discoveries which lately have been 
made there. Whenever this interesting cere- 
mony shall occur, I shall communicate the 
facta to the Press, together with the mining 
laws and such other data as will prove of in- 
terest to its readers.. From 
Belmont 
We have the intelligence that work is being 
pushed ahead on the 300-foot level of the Bel- 
mont mine as rapidly as possible. The con- 
nection with the winze in which the new body 
of ore is known to have been cut, will be ef- 
fected early this month. When once made 
stopin • will be commenced aud the mill once 
more started upon this ore. Orders have been 
received from San Francisco to put a force of 
tneu to work ou the Central Belmont mine at 
once. The El Dorado South Consolidated 
company is out with notices for bids for sink- 
ing a perpendicular shaft 100 feet— 6x16 on its 
ledge. The Josephine and other mines are 
about to be started up immediately, so that the 
folks of our sister town may soon look ,for 
lively times. 

Jefferson Canon, 
Too, forty-seven miles from here, is turning 
out to. be a place of considerable importance. 
The Prussian North and South mines are yield- 
ing very rich ores, and in quautities to keep 
the two ten-stamp mills in full blast. Their 
product is about $3,000 per diem in bullion, 
which is shipped to the" Belmont bank, and, 
there is in addition, a great deal of prospecting 
going on in every quarter of the district. The 
population is about 400, and the above two 
mines and mills employ about 150 men. The 
mines are rich and the future radiant, and 
what more does Jefferson need? 

Springfield District. 

This is a new district, situated on the west 
side of Monitor valley in this county, and about 
30 miles from its seat— Belmont, The Sheba 
led^e is among its most important discoveries. 
It is from 10 to 12 feet thick, and its outcrop 
has been traced a distance of 5,000 feet. It is 
opened by shaft and tunnel, the former 80 aud 
the latter 100 feet, along the course of the foot- 
wall. The ore is base, and contains in itself 
sufficient flux for its treatment in a cupola fur- 
nace. Experts (?) who have examined this 
mine, claim ior it in thickness and general 
average, a superiority over the famous Two G 
mine of this place, the property of the Tybo 
Consolidated company. These things may be 
so, but whether they are or not, matters but 
little. Our mental equilibrium is not disturbed 
by tne thought; nor is the importance of the 
Two G any the less diminished if such is the 
case. We are not at all envious of the Sheba, 
but on the contrary are delighted to have it 
in our power to be able to give it this gratuitous 
notice, an 1 to pronounce it a worthy property 
into the bargain. 

Having in the foregoing paragraphs given a 
general glance at the prospeots of the west and 
east sections of the State for 1875, and pointed 
out some of the distinctive features of interest 
in connection with the circumjacent camps, we 
will now see what progress has been made in 
the development of the mines of Tybo, since 
the 4th ultimo, the date of our last article to 
the Pbbss. 

The Tybo Consolidated 
Company 's, property — particularly the Two G — 
has been steadily and successfully worked since 
last writing. The vein was at that time opened 
to a depth of 298 feet; it is now penetrated to a 
depth of 323 feet, and exhibits at this point ore 
of a remarkably fine grade. The assay value of 
the two classes of ore found at this depth, is — 
galena, $331 — and quartz, $56— or an average 
of $198.50 per ton, thus proving the increased 
richness of the vein as depth is attained. The 
lode is now developed longitudinally 560 feet, 
by tunnels or, adit levels one and two, which 
are still being driven ahead. It has, however, 
increased in thickness toward the deep, being 
now five feet in the clear between walls, and 
preserves with the utmost exactitude its angle 
of inclination. The milling and smelting ores, 
also, continue their course, side by side, but 
have reversed situations, the former now show- 
ing its affinity for trie silicious lime hanging- 
wall, and the latter for the foot or porphyry 
wall. This is proper, and in accordance with 
the laws of gravitation. . 

The outlook is all that could be desired, 
there being now exposed in this mine alone, in 
the neighborhood of 60,000 tons of ore, ready 
for extraction and reduction. This amount 
would more than suffice to keep a 20-stamp 
mill and a 50 ton furnace in full blast for a 
space of two years. Explorations will, how- 
ever, be pushed ahead vigorously, in order to 
stilt further test the value and productiveness 
of the mine. 

The Lafayette 
Has also been worked with success, since last 
notice of it, a large quantity of $150 ore having 
been mined and worked. This mine, an off- 
shoot from the mother, or Two G vein, exhib- 
its all of it i mineral and structural attributes. 
Active operations have also been commenced 
on the 

Crosby 
Mine, located on the extreme northwest of ihe 
lode. A new shaft is being sunk on it, through 



ore of the same quality as found in the two 
former. 

The Casket 
Is at present idle, and will be until hoisting 
works are supplied sometime during the com- 
ing summer. This mine is opened by two j 
shafts, which cut the vein at a depth of 65 feet I 
each. A new shaft will, however, have to be 
sunk at the point of divergance of the Layfay- 
etfce from the main lead, over which the hoist- 
ing machinery is to be permanently placed, for 
the working of both. A new shaft through 
which to work the Two Gand Casket mines, 
has been sunk a distance of 60 feet, but had to 
be abandoned for the want of suitable lumber 
with which to line its compartments, when this 
is to be had, work will again be resumed upon 
it. 

The Furnace 
Shut down for much needed repairs on the 
29th ultimo, having made a run of exactly 30 
days, which, added to the 59 days formerly men- 
tioned, makes 89 days altogether that it has 
been engaged in the production of bullion. 
It reduced in the last 30 days of its run 700 
tons of ore which produced in the aggregate 80 
tons of base bullion, valued at $36,000, or 
$4.50 per ton in gold, silver and lead. This 
showing is a good one and is far ahead of the 
last one given in the Press. Up to that time 
the furnace ran od the whole 59 days, reducing 
1,260 tons of ore, w,hich produced 153 tons of I 
bullion, valued at $62,000. Adding these two 
together we have a total of 89 days run, in 
which there were reduced 1,960 tons of ore, 
which yie'ded 233 tons of crude bullion, val- 
ued at $98,000. This is . not an unfavorable 
showing, all things considered. With increas- 
ed working facilities, this exhibit will be 
largely increased. With a 20-stamp mill t\nd 
a coup'e of furnaces in full blast, as there will be - 
next summer, we may look for prosperous 
times in Tybo. There are already 90 tons of 
the mill material to haul, and the balance is ex- 
pected at an early day, so that this structure 
will soon add to our prosperity. J. D. P. 
Tybo, Nevada, Jan. 12, 1875. 

Esmeralda. 

Editors Press: — It has been many years 
since I have seen anything in your columns 
relating to the once important Esmeralda min- 
ing district; and in truth there has not very 
much transpired in the district worth record" 
ing, although that it still possesses much im- 
portance as a "mining camp," I, in common 
with many others, still firmly believe. 

During the great stock fever of 1862, '63 and 
'64, the credulous and then comparatively in- 
experienced people of California were most 
wrptchedly humbugged and swindled by having 
wild cats of all kinds, sizes and colors palmed 
off upon them as genuine mines by unscrupu- 
lous stock sharps and swindlers. The result 
was that the reputation of "the camp" suffered 
by having odium .cast upon the good mines aa 
well as poor ones — or none at all. Stockhold- 
ers refused to pay assessments for the purpose 
of prospecting the mines to any depth, and 
when the rich boulders, found on the surface, 
and the richer "bonanzas" which were found 
in the veins near the surface were worked 
out, the work stopped, and mills which cost 
from $125,000 to $250,000 have been idle from 
that day to this. And the fact is, the lowest 
depth attained in any of the works is, I 
think, not over 200 feet vertically. 

In 1867, John D. Winters, who had a mill 
here, made an effort to sink deeper and pros- 
pect thoroughly the Juniata mine, located one 
mile easterly from this town, but he having 
become bankrupt by business complications 
elsewhere the work was stopped, while every- 
thing in and about the mine looked extremely 
encouraging. 

Matters have remained substantially in statu 
quo until about three months since, when the 
Juniata Consolidated mining company, which 
owns the Juniata pvoper arid also the once 
famous real Del Monte, Wide West, Pond, Ural 
and other lodes, started in the old works with 
vim and energy, under the skillful superin- 
tendence of Mr. Warren Rose. Much time 
has necessarily benn lost in cleaning out the 
old sha't and drifts, as a new steam pnmp 
had to be procured, roads made, etc. But 
now they have arrived at a point when their 
merk will soon tell, and all the citizens — many 
of whom have stood by the place th:oc^h 
prosperity and adversity Bince 1860 and '61 
—confidently predict that in due course of 
time developments and discoveries will be 
made, which will not only richly remunerate 
those immediately connected with the enter- 
prise, but will also lead to many like opera- 
tions in the district. Many being of the 
opinion that much better locations can be 
found for deep prospecting t'uan the one now 
under operation. 

These operations will be assisted by the 
settlement of titles under the United States 
mining laws, many of the mine owners having 
already obtained their patents or taken steps 
toward that end. 

The Juniata Consolidated mining company 
also own the large mills alluded to above. They 
were built by the Real del Monte and Antelope 
mining companies in 1863 or 1864. There is 
one small mill of five stamps belonging to Hor- 
ace Marden & Co., which is started up and 
kept running semi- occasionally on small lots of 
ore (generally quite rich) taken out by "coast- 
ers," mostly from the old abandoned mines. 
More anon. Sandford. 

Aurora, Esmeralda Co., Nev., Jan. 6th, 1875. 



January 23, 1875.] 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS 



51 



Scientific ^rocress. 



Is The Ether Matter. 

Hydrogen passes th.ough cast iron as water 
tea through loose eund. The resistance which 
jaat iron ball would meet in its flight through 
i atmoiphere of hydrogen wo hid be scarcely 
ipreciable. The difference in density between 
_«t iron and hydrogen, though very g-eat, is 
Ear from infinite; were it infinite, the resistance 
which either would offer to the passage of the 
>ther wojld be infinitely slight; to us nil. So 
rith every other sort of matter in a medium in- 
Ineitely more dense or infinitely more raie 
ban itself. It is possible, therefore, to con- 
eive, as Dr. Young suggests, of series of 
•orlds of different orders, pervading each other, 
intually unknown and unknowable, in the 
tame space. 

There is in this line of thought something 
nore than purposeless speculation ; and if there 
ere not, one could hardly escape it in contem- 
ilatine the theory of fight now generally ac- 
septed by the scientific world, a theory involv- 
ng conditions so astounding that nothing short 
)f a new order of matter seems adequate to 
neet its requirements. Practically there could 
lot be an hypothesis which would answer the 
equirements of a perfect hypothesis more com- 
letely than that which attributes the phenome- 
ia of light to undulations of a highly elastic 
nedium pervadiug all space. It affords a rea- 
dable explanation of every phenomenon in 
iptics. More than that, it enables the investi- 
jator to anticipate effects which no eye has 
;een. Yet this moBt satisfy iug theory is based 
in the assumption that interstellar space which 
ve have knowledge of, whether occupied by or- 
linary matter or not, is pervaded by something 
nconceivably more solid and elastic than steel 
Attempts have been made to dispense with 
he assumed ethereal basis of light by substi- 
nting therefor some excessively rare form of 
rdinary matter. To meet the requirements of 
he case, such a gas would have to be very rare 
ndeed; at the same time it would have to pos- 
ess an elastic force of at least a million mil- 
ion (1,000,000,000,000) times as great as the 
tmospbere at the earth's surface, conditions 
[uite inconsistent with the main body of our 
mowledge concerning gases. If material, the 
'hysical basis of luminous modulations must 
e matter of an entirely different grade from 
anything else we know. 
Any comparison between ordinary matter 
nd anything so unlike it as the hypothetical 
ther must obviously be taken as suggestive 
ather than demonstrative; nevertheless the re* 
ults of such comparisons give us, perhaps, as 
orrect a notion of the physical basis of light 
b we are able to entertain. Our only clue to 
ts possible qualities Jies in the extreme rapid- 
ty with which light rays traverse it. It is un- 
.erstood that the velocity of wave motion de- 
lends, other things being equal, on the elas- 
ioity of the medium. Knowing the relative 
elocities of light and sound, Sir John He-r- 
ebel calculated the necessary elacticity of the 
ther (in other words, the amount of force 
rhich the wave theory of light require^ to be 
xerted at each point of space) as 1,148,000,- 
100,000 times the elastic force of ordinary air 
,t the surface of the earth. The atmospheric 
iressureis 15 pounds to the square inch; the 
orresponding ethereal pressure must therefore 
te about 17,000,000,000,000 pounds. The at- 
oosphere counterbalances acolumn of mercury 
10 inches high. Gould it be demonstrated in 
- similar manner, the pressure of the ether 
?ould sustain a column of mercury Bix times 
s high as the sun! 

These members give but an aproximate idea 
if the enormous solidity of the adamantine 
omething which the earth sweeps through at 
he rate of 1100 miles a minute without resist- 
ance I It pervades. our bodies and we move 
.bout in it with perfect indifference. As Prof. 
levons justly observes, all our ordinary notions 
>f matter must be laid aside in contemplating 
Conclusions like these; yet, " they are not more 
than the observed phenomena of light and 
peat force us to accept." 

I Regarded in the light of ordinary matter, the 
Bther is impossible and incredible; as an extra- 
ordinary matter, or, as we have, imagined, 
patter of a higher grade, it is consistent and 
reasonable. If we admit one such higher or 
ower grade of matter, the door is opened for 
he possible existence of an infinite series of 
them. 

The contemplation of Buch possibilities may 
it least teach us not to be hasty in limiting the 
pcope of the universe to elements such as we 
know. — Scientific American. 



Personal Equation. 

It haB been found by observation that there 
is a\ great variation in the power of .different 
individuals to determire small intervals of 
time, or in the time occupied by them to be- 
come conscious of a fact passing be'ore them. 
This is a matter of much importance in making 
astrouomical observations — f or 'nstance the de- 
termination of the time of the eract contact or 
obscuration of heavenly bodies. The correc- 
tion or averaging of this difference is called 
Personal equation," Some years ago, at a 
meeting of the Albany Institute, Prof. Hough, 
the astronomer in charge of the Albany Obser- 
vatory, read an interesting paper upon this 
subject, illustrating it by means of an instru- 
ment called a chronograph, whiob term, liter- 
erally interpreted is a time-writer oraninstru 
ment for recording intervals of time. It con- 
sisted of 11 di-k covered with white paper, and 
revolved by clock-work. From the center of 
the disk radi were drawn to the circumference, 
dividing the disk into equal parts, representing 
minute divisions of time. Over this revolving 
disk was placed a stylus, actuated by an electro- 
magnet. A cirouit -breaker waB connected with 
this electro-magnet and held in the hand of the 
observer, whose personal equation it was de- 
sired to determine. Another disk, upon which 
a circular black spot was painted, was also 
caused to revolve by clock-work. Before it 
was placed in an opaque bar, which eclipsed 
the black spot at each revolution of the disk. 
The exact time at which the edge of the black 
spot reached the obscuration of the bar was 
automatically registered. The observer hold- 
ing the circuit- breaker in his hand stood in 
front of the revolving disk, and was directed to 
operate the circuit-breaker in order to make 
the mark upon the disk the moment the black 
spot reached the bar. The difference in the 
time of registering by the observer and the au- 
tomatic registering of the instrument consti- 
tuted the personal equation. It varied consider- 
ably.with different p^ rsonB. We do not now re- 
member what the maximum variation was, but 
we recollect distinctly that with some it was 
nearly double that of others. This difference 
in the power of determining precisely when an 
event happens, as seen by the eye,* depends 
primarily upon peculiarities in nervous struc- 
ture. It may, however, vary in the same ob- 
server from time to time. Professor Hough 
remarked, in his interesting paper, that he 
found his personal equation increased 'always 
when he felt ill. 



j Dangekb of Benzine Scouring. — M. Dumas, 

at a recent meeting of the French Academy of 

Science, stated that, in examining the process 

pf scouring fabrics as usually practiced by clean- 

■Jers of old clothes (washing in benzine), he had 

discovered a novel and dangerous cause of fire. 

fiWorkmen engaged in this industry had fre- 

[ leniently complained of the benzine becoming 

'inflamed during the scrubbing; and in order to 

jteBt the question, M. Dumas caused a piece of 

Icashmere to be dipped in for a length of 18 

feet. Every time the stuff partially emerged 

from the bath, while being rubbed between the 

bands, a sharp pricking sensation upon those 

members and on the face was felt; and finally 

3parks were emitted from the fabric, sufficient, 

if the Bcouring had been briskly continued, to 

have ignited the inflammable fluid. 



, 



Theemo-Electbicitt in Ibon Ships. — There 
is a curious point, says Broad Arrow, in con- 
nection with the deviation of the compass on 
board iron ships, whioh is now beginning to 
attract the attention of scientific men, and may 
therefore, perhaps, be new to some of our read- 
ers. It is now believed that some of the sud- 
den and hitherto unaccountable changes in the 
deviation of the compasses of iron ships — 
which are often unsuspected until alleged as 
the only conceivable cause of the vessel running 
ashore — are the effects of an unequal and vary- 
ing distribution of heat over the iron hull; for 
it is well known that electricity is generated in 
a metallic substance by heat applied in a cer- 
tain way, and, in fact, there is a branch of 
electrical science called thermo-electricity, de- 
voted to the investigation of phenomena of this 
kind. Sudden slight changes of compass devi- 
ation, not exceeding Ave degrees, have been 
noticed on board iron ships on the North Amer- 
ican coast, and these are now attributed to 
changes in the hull, occasioned by the vessel 
passing from warm to cold water, and vice versa. 
The warm temperature of the gulf stream, 
taken in connection with the cold counter-cur- 
rent, is considered' to be quite sufficient to ac- 
count for many of the suspected compass 
errors on board iron ships. 

The Abtificial Vanilla. — We alluded a few 
weeks since to the fact of the discovery that the 
odorous principle of the vanilla beans could be 
obtained. "We are now enabled to give the sub- 
stance of the English patent that has been is- 
sued for this to Wilhelm Haarman, Ph.D., 
analytical chemist, G-eorgenstrasse, Berlin, 
Germany. Take, first, coniferine; or, secondly, 
the sap of plants mentioned above which has 
been purified or liberated from alumina or other 
impurities ; or, thirdly, an extract of all those 
parts of the just-mentioned plants containing 
coniferine; or, fourthly, the products obtained 
from coniferine by means of fermentation, pu- 
trefaction, or similar action; and treat one 
another with oxidising agents or such agents of 
similar action, such as bi-chromate of potas- 
sium and sulphuric acid, or any other peroxide, 
oxide, acid or salt, which produce the same ef- 
fect. The product of the reaction in all these 
cases is artificial vanilline, which has been 
proved to be identical in all physical and chem- 
ical properties with the aromatic principle ob- 
tained by the extraction, etc., of the natural 
vanilla beans. 

Asteonomioal. — The, astronomical discov- 
eries of 1874, apart from those which may have 
been made by observers of the transit of Venus, 
were few and comparatively unimportant. Six 
asteroids were discovered, two by American as- 
tronomers, and three by Palisa, at P?>la, near 
Berlin. Of the four comets discovered in 1874, 
that of Coggia only, was especially interesting. 
The meteoric shower of November 14th en- 
tirely failed lor 1874. According to the calcu- 
lations of some astronomers, no further returns 
of this meteoric display in any considerable 
numbers can be expected till near the close of 
the century. 



The Physical Forces abe Modes op Etbeb 
Pressctbe. — Professor Cballis, of Cambridge 
University, after long and exhaustive researches 
upon galvanic and magnetic action, concludes 
that the hydro-dynamical theory of action is 
alone correct. The theoretical explanation of 
galvanic and magnetic phenomena is to be 
sought by means of mathematical deductions. 
The author believes that the soience of theo- 
retical phywicB, laid down in Newton's "Prin- 
cipia," is by no meann confined to physical 
astronomy, but comprehends the principles oi 
all departments of natural philosophy which 
have relation to physical force. Hia conclu- 
sions on galvanic and magnetic action have 
been reached in conformity with Newton's 
rules and principles. The author's main con- 
clusions, relative to the modus operandi of the 
physical forces, to which this system of philos- 
ophy seems to point, are: That they are all 
modes of pressure of the ether; that the forces 
concerned in light, heat, molecular attraction 
and repulsion, and gravity are dynamical 
results of vibrations of the ether; and that elec- 
tricity and galvanic, and magnetic forces are 
due to its pressure in uteady motions. 



ECHANICAL PROGRESS. 



Interesting Steam Boiler Experiment. 

A correspondent of the Scientific American 
furnishes that journal with the following ac- 
count of a late experiment made by him : 

"With the intention of increasing the ca- 
pacity of a steam boiler (horizontal, 42'inches 
in diameter and 18 feet long, with H2 tubes), I 
introduced some four inch tubes under the 
boiler, commencing just behind the bridge wall 
and running back the length of the boiler. 
These pipes had cast iron connections at the 
bendB. I placed them eight inches below the 
bottom of the boiler, connected them at the 
back end of the boiler near the bottom, and 
attat-hf d the feed pump near the front, and fed 
with hot water. The first day they worked 
well and improved the boiler greatly in steam- 
ing capacity; but on the third day, just after 
staiting up, with the first stroke of the pump, 
the cast iron end on the pipe where the -feed 
pipe was connected burst with a loud report, 
and for a few seconds nothing but blue steam 
escaped, and finally water and^ Bteam. Think- 
ing the trouble was in pumping in water so 
near the fire and bridge wall, I changed the 
connection, putting the feed pipe into the mud 
drum, and then letting the back connection 
stay as it was, making a series of circulating 
tubes. On firing up this time, I was alarmed 
by a succession of concussions or jars in the 
boiler that shook the walls; but by firing slow- 
ly, we got up steam without any accident. In 
an hour or two we noticed that the tubes near- 
est the fire and bridge wall were red hot, and 
blue steam was escaping from the joints of the 
connections ou the ends of the tubeB. We 
drew the fire and removed the tubes. We 
found a great improvement by the use of these 
tubes, and did not like to abandon the use of 
them. We are at a loss to account for the 
phenomenon of blue steam being where we ex- 
pected nothing but water. What is our rem- 
edy." 

In answer so this query, the Scientific Ameri- 
can says: "The trouble seems to have been 
that the pipes got so hot that they made steam 
faster than it could be carried off, the circula- 
tion being imperfect. It will probably be 
necessary to use larger pipes, or to discard the 
return bends, to make the present arrangement 
successful. The same trouble has occured 
with some forms of sectional boilerB, whose use 
has been abandoned on account of the poor 
circulation." 

Assembling in Machine Making. 

The system of making the component parts 
of a machine or implement in distinct pieces 
of fixed shape and dimensions, so that corres- 
ponding parts are interchangeable, is known as 
"assembling." The term' is, however, more 
strictly applicable to their fitting together, after 
being separately and accurately made, accord- 
ing to fixed patterns, and constantly compared 
by gauges and templates which teBt the dimen- 
sions. 

This system of interchangeability of parts 
was first introduced into the French artillery 
service by General Gribeauval about 17G5. He 
reduced the gun carriages to classes, and so ar- 
ranged many of the parts that they could be 
applied indiscriminately to any carriage of the 
class for which they were made. The system 
was afterward extended into Beveral European 
services, and into that or the United StateB. 

The firBt firearm attempted to be made on 
this system was the breech-loader of John H. 
Hall, of North Yarmouth, Massachusetts, 1811; 
of which 10,000 were made for the United 
States, $10,000 being voted the inventor in 
1836, being at the rate of one dollar per gun. 
Some of them were captured in Fort Donelson, 
February 1§, 1862. They were probably the 
first breech-loading military arms ever issued 
to troops. 

The extent to which the system of gauges 
was carried with the Hall arm is not accurately 
known, but it is doubtless true that the princi- 
ple was brought to a high state of system and 
accuracy by Col. Colt, of Connecticut, in the 
manufacture of his pistols. Among the most 
important of extensions of this principle has 



been the making of special machines to fashion 
particular parts, or even Bpecial portions of in- 
dividual pieoes, so that each separate part may 
be shaped by suooessive machineB, and bored 
by others, issuing in the exact form required. 

This plan requires large capital, and will not 
pay unless a great number of like articles be 
required, but has been extensively introduced 
into this country, and from hence into Eng- 
land, and to some extent on the continent of 
Europe. All the Government breech-loadiug 
fire-arms are thue made. The greater number of 
the military arms of Europe and Egypt are 
thus ma e in the United States for the various 
countries. The Snider gun, a modification of an 
American model, is made at the Enfield Arse- 
nal, England, on special machineB made for that 
purpose in duplicate at the Colt works, Hart- 
ford, Connecticut. Pratt & Whitney, of 
Hartford, are just completing for Germany a 
full set of special machines and gauges for the 
manufacture of the Miuser rifle, adopted by 
Prussia for the confederate German States. 

The first watch made on this pi in was the 
"American" watch, of Waltham, Massachu- 
setts, the system extending down to the almost 
microscopic screws and other small parts. All 
the prominent sewing machines are so made; 
the same with Laub's knitting machine, and 
probe bly others. Many kinds of agricultural 
implements, including plows, harvesters, 
threshers and wagons, are made of inteichauge- 
ab'e parts. The system has been carried into 
locomotive building; about seven grades of en- 
gines, it is understood, are employed on the 
Pennsylvania Central railroad, corresponding 
purts of a given grade being precisely similar, 
bo as to fit any eDgine of the class. This is the 
American system of "assembling." — Harper'a 
Magazine. 

A Promising Invention— Re-rolling Steel 
Rails. 

One of the objections which many railroad 
men urge against steel rails his been the diffi- 
culty of profitably utilizing them when worn 
out. This, though not a very formidable argu- 
ment against them, when their great endurance 
in considered, constitutes, perhaps, a slight 
objection. Hitherto tbey have never been 
rolled when cut up and treated as an iron rail 
pile, as they do not weld. We apeak now of 
Bessemer caBt-Bteel rails; puddled steel headed 
rails are successfully produced, and certainly 
outwear the iron article; the so called silicon 
steel is but a variety of puddled steel. In a 
few years the large and increasing amount of 
Bessemer rails laid will be worn put, and must 
be replaced, thus rendering their proper utili- 
zation, in a secondary degree, a question of na- 
tional importance. As scrap steel in the regu- 
lar Bessemer manufacture they could not be 
disposed of ; they cannot be melted alone in a 
furnace, as they burn; and their use in the 
Siemens-Martin process, in which a bath of 
cast iron is decarbonized by the addition of 
wrought iron scrap, sponge, or steel scrap, 
would also prove a slow method of consump- 
tion. Re-rolling into a solid steel rail is the 
most rational and economical method, if it can 
be effected. It is barely possible that it is 
practicable with the aid of some flux, and one 
certainly worthy of trial has been invented by 
M. G. C. Henry, an analytical chemist of Bur- 
lington, Iowa. Its U6e has been very favora- 
bly considered by the Springfield Boiling Mill 
Superintendent, and it is giving good results in 
steel wire manufactured in St. Louis. At the 
Joliet Iron and Steel Works standard Besse- 
mer steel, containing 0,35 of carbon, was weld- 
ed perfectly, at a smith forge, no joint being 
afterward visible. 

The function of a flux, in the welding pro- 
cess, is to form a fusible slag, by its union with 
the scale, or oxide, which forms upon the sur- 
faces of heated iron. Borax, which is an acid 
salt of soda, has this property, and is common- 
ly used by smiths; but its cost, about forty-five 
(45) cents per pound, precludes its use on a 
large scale. Mr. Henry thinks he can furnish 
the flux for $15.00 per ton. It is a dark look- 
ing substance, and fuses at a light red heat. 
The low degree of heat, comparatively, at 
which steel burns, may alone account for the 
difficulty in welding it, and if a substance can 
be kept at the welding surfaces which shall re- 
move this scale as rapidly as it forms, it would 
seem that at least the ■chemical difficulties were 
overcome. It is Mr. Henry's hope to enlist the 
attention of some rolling mill sufficiently to try 
the invention upon a steel rail pile, rolling the 
rails into B forms, regularly piling as in re- 
rolling iron, and by placing the flux on the top 
of the pile in the furnace, it is possible that 
in passing, as a certain quantity flows down 
the sides, and into the joints, it will make 
the pieces co-hese sufficiently to turn over the 
pile. As the flux is not injured by heat, in- 
creasing the whole pile in a bath of it has been 
suggested. If this succeeds, mills could advan- 
tageously re-uoll their second quality rails. It 
is to be hoped that some one may try the ex- 
periment. — Western Manufacturer. 



Hardening the Subfacb of Steel. — Mr. G. 
Armes, of Rochester, has proved that the sur- 
face of steel may be hardened, without harden- 
ing the mass of the metal, by placing the eteel 
in a cylinder for exam pie — upon an engine-lathe, 
and, while it is in motion, bringing into con- 
tact with it an emery wheel, rotating at a ve- 
locity of about one thousand eight hundred 
revolutions per minute. 



52 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



[January 23, 1875. 



Sales at the S. F. Stock Exchange. 



Last Week. 

Thubsday, Januaby 14. 
mobotho session. 

1140 Ophlr ..165@183 

2ft -..-b 30 192 

8090 Mexican 62@5f 

200 ....b5 54@5i 

605 Gould & Curry 5S«5' L 

2260 Best A Belcher 61@63 

400 Savage 147@151 

50 ....b 30 

425 Chollar.... 

110 Hale &Norcross-..W(a56 
705 Crown Point 44®45 

20 ....b 5 UH 

70 ....b30 45/ " 

230 Yellow Jacket. ..13f_ 

30 ....b5 140 

1740 Imperial 18J£@19 

50 ....b 5 .- 15^ 

410 Empire 13@133j 

155 Kentock 1S®19>S 

995 Alpha 28031 

8ft Eclipse 11@12 

595 Belcber 50J£(fl)51 

50 ....b S ^.51 

330 Confidence '", 

450 Con Virginia 570(§595 

330 Sierra Nevada.... VA%\ 

.'150 Daney 1)m 

187 California, 565& - 

5 „..b 30 590 

260 Overman ," " 

155 Justice 130@135 

100 Succor 4 

95 Union 72#@75 

570 Lady Bryan Sfijg, 1 * 

209 Julia .§©9 

240 Globe l^@l^ 

235 Caledonia 2J@24 

90 Bullion 35@36 

V* Utah b@ 

180 Silver Hill 10@lfe. 

70 Challenge '. 11 

570 Dayton t% 



This Week. 

THDBSDAY, JANUARY 21. 
MOHNTHG SESSION. 

590 Alpha 32@35 

15 .. b 5 33 

1230 Belcher 50®52 

70 ....1)5 50M 

2462 Best & Belcher 80®88 

220 ....b5 87@84J| 

3355 Gould A Curry 69®70 

50 ....blO 72 

150 ....b30 Tdf^lV-2 

50 ...-b5 713* 

95 Hale A Norcross...60@6l 

1715 Imperial 170I7Jfi 

90 Justice 165@l72,W 

1060 Ken nek 22@23 

10 ....b30 24 

1755 Mexican 60_®64 

1340 Ophir 225(51233 

485 Overman 8b@?8 

110 „..b30 89®88 

160 Succor 5^1,6 

100 Savage 170@168 

470 S Nevada 21@22 

780 Union Con 95@92 

275 Y Jacket 140&137 



AFTERNOON SESSION. 

1900 Meadow Valley 7@8 

1045 Raymond & Ely.... 33®35 
770 Eureka Consolidated. .15 

50 Pioche 4& 

220 WashAOreole... " 
520 American Flag.. 

3005 Belmont 10® l^ 

465 Newark 1@1^ 

970 Rve Patch V ■/„ a ■■,, 

170 Eldorado South 2 

200 Eldorado North 50o 

230 Chariot Mill.... ....lk@2 

100 IdaElmore 1% 

55 Mahogany 4 

100 Empire 1 

185 Bock Island 5W@6 

400 Piotou 75c 

170 New York 5m5'., 

1785 Occiden tal by~~ 

110 American Flat... 1%& 
750 f-enator 1% 

2435 Phil Sheridan... .tyiW&U 

535 Woodville 3M(g)3M 

20 Mint ] 

420 Lady "Wa9bington2.3^@3 

985 Kossuth 4KQ4J6 

650 Seg Bock Island \\ 

2175 Andes ll@ll& 

300 Pacific \)A 

150 Niagara - I 

600 Ward 43* 

65 Scorpion 4®l% 

76U Cosmopolitan. ...\%gft% 

2250 Leviathan 2^@2?6 

1500 Georgia U4 



AFTEBNOON SESSION. 

530 Meadow Valley. ...7K®7 

420 Raymond & Ely. ...33@35 
20 Eureka Con F4& 

140 Pioche .5 

5250 Wash & Creole. . 1^®1W 

125 America] Flag. ..2>$@23? 

625 Belmont 9'4@9^ 

1150 N Belmont 2?&@2!^ 

490 Rye Patch 3}£®3$6 

430 Eldo South I 1 ,,.'«■■ I - 

120 South Chariot .\®VA 

50 Empire l>g 

1775 Lady Bryan 9@10 

760 Julia 9«®10 

190 Caledonia .25@'S« 

27S Knickerbocker iU(d& 

230 Globe 1M®2 

T20 Baltimore 8J^@9K 

170 Bacon 8M 

625 Bullion 53@55 

485 Utah 8@§»<i 

500 SHilt 12&313 

325 Eciipse 10 

35 Trenoh 12@12J£ 

160 Challenge I ' v.r 11 

340 Dayton 5M®5 

615 Rhode Island . . . .6M®t% 

320 Pictou 6J£ 

865 New York 5 

1065 Occidental B'-at;'; 

75 Senator \%@'i% 

.600 Phil Sheridan. . ..3^@3ii 

30 American Flat 7j>4 

100 Tyler 87^c 

275 Alta IM 

1202 Woodville 3>ri@4 

50 Sutro lk 

1450 Mint .1 

150 Lady Washington . . . .25a 

600 Green 3Ji 

755 Kossuth 4 H@4?i 



Mining Stocks. 

The stock market during the past week has 
not been in as firm a condition as for some 
time past. Prices have been comparatively 
low, and the dull weather has brought rather 
dull times for the brokers compared with the 
recent busy season. Whether the big break 
which was expected has oome or not we do not 
know, but there has been a pretty heavy fall. 
There is no special change in the Comstocks 
and the Enterprise says of the mines. Tbere 
is no change in the bonanza mines or any 
other mines along the Comstock range except 
for the better, therefore the decline in stocks is 
charged by onr people to the manipulations of 
big operators in San Francisco, who, it is sup- 
posed, have locked up all the money they 
could lay their hands upon and who have in 
this way and other ways cinched the market. 
Such of our people as own in the bonanza 
mines and have their stocks paid for are but 
little disturbed, as they feel perfectly safe so 
long as an earthquake does not come and 
swallow up the entire north end of the lead. 
As hundreds of persons— not only among our 
own citizens, but also from San Francisco and 
many other places — have visited and critically 
examined the great ore body, there oan be no 
mistake about that. In regard to the richness 
of the ore, it is being ascertained by actual 
working in the new mill that it is even richer 
than was supposed by those who had examined 
it while it was standing in the mine. The 
drifts in the California, in the 1400 and 1500-ft 
levels are already in good ore and are fast ad- 
vancing toward the very rich ore of the great 
bonanza, while the drift frorn the Gould & 
Curry, on thb 1550-ft level, is 30 feet into Cali- 
fornia ground, and is being pushed ahead in 
the same rich ore as is found above on the 
1500 ft level. At the Ophir end tbere is a con- 
stant and marked improvement, notwithstand- 
ing the many falsehoods that have been indus- 
triously circulated in regard to it in San Fran- 
cisco. 

Lytlb & Hawket have been offered $100,000 
for their quicksilver claim in Cinnabar district, 
Trinity county. They have three large retorts 
in position at the foot of the mountain, with 
whioh they expect to prodace 1,000 pounds of 
quicksilver daily. Dr. E. H. Pardee, of Oak- 
land, has offered J. F. Doliffe $10,000 for his 
mine, and negotiations are now pending. The 
Trinity company are in 85 feet with their tun- 
nel, and have favorable indications. 11 men 
are wintering at Ciunabnr. A great rush is ex- 
pected as soon as spring opens. 

A man named Mattock, from Carson, Nevada, 
has discovered an extensive cinnabar ledge in 
Piute district, Inyo county. There have re- 
cently been several important gold and silver 
discoveries near this locality. 



MINING SHAREHOLDERS' DIRECTORY. 



Compiled every Thursday from Advertisements in tlfe Mining: and Scientific Press and 

other S. F. Journals. ] 



ASSESSMENTS.— STOCKS ON THE LIST OF THE BOARDS. 



Company. 



Location. No. Ami. Levied. Delinq'nt. Sale-. Secretary. Place of Business. 



American Flat M Co Washoe 

Andes S M Co Washoe 

Arizona & Utah 51 Co Washoe 

Arizona S M Co UnionviUe Nevada 

Baltimore Cons M Co Washoe 

Bellevue M Co Plaeer^Co Cal 

Bowery Cons M Co 
Caledonia S M Co 
Chariot Mill A M Co 
Confluence M Co 
Daney M Co 
Empire Mill & M Co 

■l.'L.ri^o R 711 I" 1 ,. 



Florida S M Co 
Globe Cons M Co 
Globe M Co 
Golden Chariot M Co 
Hale & Norcro"fl S M Co 
Indus G & S M Co 
Iowa M Co 
Justice M Co 
Kentuck M Co 
Knickerbocker M Co 
Lady Washington M Co 
Mahopany A4SJI Co 
New York Cons M Co 



Ely District 
Washoe 
San Diego Co 
Cal 
Washoe 
Washoe 
Washoe 
Washoe 
Washoe 
Idaho 
Washoe 
Washoe 
Washoe 
Washoe 
Washoe 
Washoe 
Washoe 
Idaho 
Washoe 



Original Gold Hill G ASM Co Washoe 2 



Overman S M Co 

Page Tunnel Co 

Pioche S M Co 

Pioche W est Ex M Co 

Poorman G & S M Co 

Raymond & Ely S M Co 

Red Jacket M Co 

Rock Island G & S M Co 

Savage M Co 

Sierra Nevada S M Co 

Silver Cord M Co 

South Chariot M Co 

Tyler M Co 

Utah SM Co , l ' n 

Washincton &, Creole M Co 

Yellow Jacket S M Co 



Washoe 

Utah 

Ely District 

Ely District 

Idaho 

Pioohe 

Idaho 

Washoe 

Washoe 

Washoe ■ 

Idaho 

Idaho 

Washoe 

Washoe 

Ely Dist 

Waahoe 



1 00 Dec 7 

B0 Dec? 

75 Deo 10 

1 00 Nov 30 

100 Dec 5 

60 Dec 10 

20 Dec 15 

3 00 Jan 8 

50 Dec 24 

30 Jan 16 

75 Jan 12 

50 Dec 28 

I 00 Jan 8 

75 Dec 10 

75 Dec 10 

1 50 Jan 4 

5 CO Jan 8 

25 Dec 30 

25 Jan 13 

5 00 Jan. 12 

1 00 Dec 3 

1 50 Dec 28 
30 Dec 17 

2 00 Jan 5 
50 Dec 5 
50 Dec 12 

3 00 Dec 1 

5 Dec 12 

— Dec 11 

30 Dec 28 

1 00 Jan IS 

3 00 Jan 18 

50 Nov 28 

1 00 Jan 13 

5 00 Dec 5 

3 00 Dec 1 

1 00 Jan 2 

1 00 Jan 9 

50 Nov 13 

1 00 Nov 25 

50 Dec 8 

5 00 Dec 10 



Jan 9 
Jan 11 
Jan 14 
Jan 8 
Jan 8 
Jan 14 
Jan 25 
Feb 12 
Jan 23 
Feb 23 
Feb 16 
Jau29 
Feb 10 
Jan 14 
Jan 14 
Feb 8 
Feb 11 
Jan 30 
Feb 15 
Feb 12 
Jan 5 
Jan 30 
Jan 21 
Feb 11 
Jan 6 
Jan 14 
Jan 5 
Jan 20 
Jan 21 
Feb 3 
Feb 24 
Feb 26 
Jan 5 
Feb 17 
Jan 1 
Jan 5 
Feb 5 
Feb 16 
Jan 21 
Dec 30 
JanU 
Jan 13 



Jan 27 
Febl 
Feb 2 
Jan 29 
Jan 29 
Feb 4 
Feb 28 
Mar 5 
Feb 13 
Mar 17 
Mar 9 
Feb 18- 
Mar2 
Feb 2 
Feb 2 
Feb 23 
Mar 5 
Feb 18 
MarlO 
Mar 2 
Jan 28 
Feb 19 
Feb 8 
Mar 4 
Jan 25 
Febl 
Jan 26 
Feb 20 
Feb 16 
Feb 25 
Mar 17 
Mar 26 
Jan 26 
Mar 9 
Jan 27 
Jan 26 
Feb 26 
Mar 9 
Feb 12 
Jan 20 
Feb 4 
Feb 13 



O A Sankey 
M Land ers 
J Maguire 
Wm Willis 
D T Bagley 
D F Verdenal 
OE Elliott 
R Wegener 
F Swift 
W S Anderson 
G R Spinney 
W E Dean 
li Hermann 
J Maguire 
J Maguire 
L Kaplan 
J F Lightner 
D Wilder 
A D Carpenter 
J S Kennedy 
F Swift 
H Boyle 
H C Kibbe 
C B Higgins 
H O Kibbe 



331 Montgomery at 

507 Montgomery st 

419 California st 

419 California st 

401 California st 

409 California st 

419 California st 

414 California at 

419 California st 

210 Battery st 

320 California st 

419 California st 

11 Pine st 

419 California st 

419 California st 

Merchants' Ex 

438 California st 

Merchanrs' Ex 

605 Clay st 

Merchants' Ex 

419 California st 

Stevenson's Bldg 

419 California st 

402 Montgomery st 

419 California st 



W M Helman Fireman's Fund Bldg 



G D Edwards 
J Hardy 
O E Elliott 
T L Kimball 
W Willis 
T W Colburn 
Wm Willis 
J W Clark 
E B Holmes 
G D Edwards 
Frank Swift 
O H Bogart 
O D Squire 
W E Dean 
F D Cleary 
G W Hopkins 



414Californ 

418 California st 

419 California st 
4U9 California st 

419 California st 
413 California st 

419 California st 

413 California st 
419 California st 

414 California st 
419 Calif orniast 

402 Montgomery st 

Stevenson's Bldg 

419 California st 

Merchants' Ex 

Gold Hill 



OTHER COMPANIES— NOT ON THE LISTS OF THE BOARDS. 



Baltic OonB M Co Washoe 

Calaveras Hydraulic M Co Cal 

California and Arizona M Co Arizona 



California Cons M &■ M Co 
Combination G & S M Co 
Con Ret'orma L A S M Co 
Edith Quicksilver M Co 
Enterprise Cons M Co 
Equitable Tnnnel M Co 
Florence M Co 
M Co 



Cal 

Pan ami nt 

Lower Cal 

Cal 

Oal 

Utah 

Humboldt Co Cal 

Washoe 



Holcomb Valley Cal 

Nevada Co Cal 

Utah 

Mariposa Co Cal 

Robinson Dist 

Idaho 



ColdMtGMCo 
Gold Run M Co 
Golden Rule SMCo 
Hasloe M 4 M Co 
Hayes Q & SMCo 
Illinois Central M Co 
Independence Cons M Co Cal 

Juniata. Cons S M Co Aurora Nev 

Kearsarge Cons Quicksilver M Co Cal 
Kennedy M Co Amador Co Cal 

Kevstone No 1 & 2 M Co Arizona- 

Martin & Walling M & M Co ■ Cal 

New York M Co Washoe 

North Bloomfield Gravel M Co Cal 

Oneida M Co Amador Co Oal 

Pinto M Co ^ hi i? Pl ? e 

Prussian O & S M Co Nye Co Nevada 
Rattlesnake Quicksilver M Co Cal 

South Fork M & Canal Co „ Cal 

Star King S 51 Co Elko Co Nevada 

Wells. Fargo & Co M Co Washoe 

Wyoming G M Co _ ; ' Cal 

Yarborough S M Co Kern Co Cal 



IS 


Nov 18 


Dec 23 


Febl 


i> 


Deo 1 


Jan 9 


Jan 25 


III 


Jan 8 


>eb22 


Mar 12 


1 IMI 


Jan 14 


Feb 16 


Mar ft 


III 


Dec 28 


Feb 1 


Feb 23 


H) 


Dee 24 


Jan 31) 


Feb 20 


■a 


Dec 2a 


Feb S 


Feb 23 


1 ■<. ' ■ IVc 26 


Feb 6 


Mar 3 


25 


Jan 12 


Feb 17 


Mar 9 


III 


Dec5 


Jan 8 


Feb 3 


1 llll 


Dec 23 


Feb 2 


Feb 20 


All 


Nov 19 


Dec 29 


Jan 23 


fll 


Dec 7 


JanU 


Feb 3 


ft 


Dec 8 


Jan 15 


Feb 15 


1 !1S 


Jim 13 


Feb 16 


Mar 16 


2» 


Jan 4 


Feb 12 


Mar 8 


Ml 


Dec 24 


Jan 30 


Feb 23 


III 


Jan 9 


Feb 17 


MarlO 


1 Ml 


Dec 16 


Jan 21 


Feb.10 


llll 


Dec 23 


Feb 8 


Feb 22 


1 mi 


Dec 16 


Jan 20 


Feb 10 


1 IKI 


Deo 12 


Jan 12 


. Febl 


Ml 


Deo 7 


Jan 8 


Jan 23 


Ml 


DecS 


Jan 6 


Jan 25 


1 llll 


Decl 


Jan 4 


Jan 25 


1 nil 


Dec 1! 


Jan 16 


Feb 3 


III 


Jan 9 


Feb 15 


Mar 8 


1 llll 


Jan 12 


Feb 18 


Mar 12 


1 8fi 


Dec 24 


Jan 28 


Feb 19 


h 


Dec 7 


Jan 10 


Febl 


•a 


Dec 4 


Jan 8 


Jan 26 




Dec 21 


Jan 30 


Feb 18 


.Ml 


Jan 13 


Feb 13 


Marl 


30 


Doc 23 


Jan 30 


Fob 23 



B Bums 507 Montgomery st 

A Shear 321 Battery st 

TE Jewell 507 Montgomery at 

J W Tripp 408 CafiforPia st 

D Wilder Merchants' Ex 

A D Carpenter 605 Clay st 

W Stuart 113 Liedesdortf st 

F J H ermann 418 Kearny at 

C S Healy Merchants' Ex 

I E Delavau 220 Montgomery st 

E F Stone 419 California st 

J P Cavallier 513 California st 

C C Palmer 41 Market st 

K Wertheimer 530 Clay st 

W A M Van Bokkelen 419 Cal st 

G R Spinney 320 California st 

402 Montgomery st 
418 Kearny st 



R H Brown 
F J Hermann 
CSNeal 
JMcAflee 
A Wissel 
W R Townsend 
J W Tripp 
H O Kibbe 
I Derby 
I. Kaplan 
A K Durbrow 
R H Brown 
A Baird 
H Knapp 
L Kaplan 
A O Taylor 
W JUunn 
E Barry 



419 California st 

408 California st 

210 California st 

330 Pine st 

408 California st 

419 California st 

320 California st 

Merchants' Ex 

43* California st 

402 Montgomery st 

316 California st 

306 Montgomery st 

Merchants' Ex 

331 Montgomery st 

410 Montgomery st 

415 Montgomery st 



MEETINGS TO BE HELD. 



Name of Co. 

American Nevada M Co 
Belcher M Co 
California M Co 
Consolidated Amador 
Consolidated Virginia 
Grown Point Ex M Co 
Florida S M Co 
GermanlaM Co 
Globe Cons M Co 
(iould & Curry S M Co 
Iowa M Oo 
Justice M Oo 
Keystone Cons 51 Co 
Ladv Bryan M Co 
Pacific M Co 
Pattern M Oo 
Raymond & Ely M Co 
Red Jacket M Co 
Saw Pit Flat Cons M Co 
Succor M A M Oo 
Sunrise G A S M Co 
Union Cons M Co 
Wells Fargo G & S M Oo 



LLo cation. Secretary. 



Washoe 

Washoe 

Cal 

Washoe 



Washoe 
Washoe 
Washoe 
Washoe 



Ely District 

Idaho 

Cal 

Washoe 



L Hermann 
H C Kibbe 
Called by Trustees 
FB Latham 
Called by Trustees 
G R Spinney 
L Hermann 
J W Tripp 
J Maguire 
Called by Trustees 
Called by Trustees 
J S Kennedy 
Frank Swift 
Called by Trustees 
J W Clark 
L Hermann 
T W Colburn 
Wm Willis 
J W Clark 
Called by Trustees 
Q R Spinney 
Called by Trustees 
Called by Trustees 



Office in S.F. 

330 Pine st 
419 California st 

401 California st 
4U2 California st 

401 California st 
320 California st 

331 Pine st 
408 California st 
419 California st 
438 California st 

605 Clay st 

Merchants Ex 

419 California st 

419 California st 

418 California st 

330 Pine Bt 

418 California st 

419 Calii orniast 

418 California st 

302 Montgomery st 

320 California st 

Merchants' Ex 

331 Montgomery st 



Sleeting:. 

Annual 
Annual 
Speoial 
Annual 
Special 
Annual 
Annual 
Annual 
Annual 
Special 
Speoial 
Annual 
Annual 
Speoial 
Annual 
Annual 
Annual 
Annual 
Annual 
Special 
Annual 
Special 
special 



Date, 

Feb 4 
Jau2f> 
Jan2ti 

Febl 
Jan 26 
Jan 27 

Feb 2 

Febl 
Jan 30 
Jan 25 
Feb 16 
Feb 15 
Jan 20 
Feb 11 
Jan 26 
Jan 28 
Jan 26 

Febl 
Feb 10 
Jan 30 
Jan 28 
Jan 23 
Jan 26 



LATEST DIVIDENDS (within three months)— MINING INCORPORATIONS. 



Name of Co. 



Location. Secretary. Office in S. F. Amount. 



Belcher M. Co. 

Chariot M AM Co 

Consolidated Virginia M Co 

Crown Point M Co 

Diana M. Co. 

Eureka Consolidated M Co 

Rye Patch M Co 



Washoe. H. C. Kibbe, 
Cal Frank Swift 
Washoe D T Baelcy 
Washoe C E Elliott 
N. C. Ka^set, 
Ncv WWTraylor 
Nevada DF Verdenal 



1*19 California st 
4i9 California st 
401 California st 
414 California st 
220 Clay st. 
419 California st 
409 California st 



3 CO 
2 00 
100 



Payable. 

Janll 
Nov 16 
Janll 
Jan 12 



New Incorporations. 



The following companies have filed certificates of in- 
corporation in the County Clerk's Office, San Francisco. 

Woodville Cons. M. Co. Gold Hill, Nev. Jan. 14. 
Capital stock, $12,000,000. Directors— W. Sherman, 
Robt. Sherwood, J. R. Lee, J. S. Wall and H. G. May- 
sard. _. 

Spanish S. M. Co., Jan. 14. Location: Flowery Dis- 
trict, Nevada. Capital stock, $5,000,000. Directors- 
George M. Pinne, D. L. McDonald, Jas. H. Crossman, 
James A. Pritchard and Michael Skelly. 

Mutual Indemnity Association of Grangers of 
Cal-, Jan. 14. Object: To secure to the families or 
friends of deceased members such pecuniary aid as 
6hall shield them against waDt, by paying to the nom- 
inee of such member the sum of $1,000, the same to be 
paid by assessment on surviving members. The Di- 
rectors are, Josiah Earl, J. D. Blanchard, A- W. 
Thompson, E. Hallet, W. L. Overhiser, J. A. Wilcox and 
C. J. Mosley. 

Califorsia Bank G. S. & M. Co., Jan. 15. Location: 
Storey county, Nevada. Directors— John R. Spring, 
E. P. Brown, A. B. Perkins, Arthur C. Taylor and Syd- 
ney O. Herbert. Capital stock, $10,000,000, divided into 
100,000 shares. 

Bonanza M. Co., Jan. 15. Location: Virginia City, 
Nevada. Objects: To acquire water rights, ditches and 
flumes, and to develop certain mines. Directors— J. 
R. Grannisf, H. W. Berryman, David Conkling, Richard 
W. Heath, Jr. and John Landers. Capital stock, $10,- 
000,000, divided into 100,000 shares. 

Rocky Bar M. Co., Jan. 15. Location 
ty, Nevada. Directors — E. J. Baldwin, 
Alex. MacAbee, A. Roos and M. Strauss. 
$0,000,000, divided into 60,000 shares. 

Pomposa Quicksilver M. Co , Jan. 15. Location: 
Santa Barbara- county. Directors— Joseph G. B. Isham, 
S. Heydenfeldt, Jr., Christian Reis, O. H. Bogart and 
S. Heydenfeldt. Capital stock, $10,000,000 divided into 
100,000 Bhares. 

Nevada Quicksilver M. Co., Jan. 15. Location: 



Storey coun- 
R. H. Lloyd, 
Capital stock, 



Monterey county. Directors— L. Goodwin, J. B. Win- 
ter, Thos. Eagle, M. Little and H. F. Pitts. Capital 
stock, $6,000,000, in 100,000 BhareB. 

North Lady Bryan. M. Co., Jan, 16. Location: 
Storey county, Nevada. Capital stock, $6,000,000. Di- 
rectors— O. D. O'Sullivan, P. J. White, Robt. Sher- 
wood, P. J. Cassinand Wm. Burley. 

Consolidated Bonanza G. & S. Co., Jan. 19. Loca- 
tion: Ormsby county, Nevada. Directors — Caleb 8. 
Hobbs, John K. Hobbs, Wales L. Palmer, Israel W. 
Knox and Dyer A. Carpenter. Capital stock, $5,000,000, 
divided into 100,000 shares. 

Eureka Lamp Co., Jan. 19. The object is to carry on 
a general mercantile business of buying and selling and 
manufacturing the self-lighting lamp and gas attach- 
ments. Directors— A. L. Day, C. P. Rank, J. T. Doyle, 
C. Ma6on and John Ben. Tungate. Capital stock, 
SoO.OOO, divided into 5,000 shares. 

tso S. M. Co., Jan. 16. Location: Virginia City, 
Nevada. Capital stock, $10,000,000. Directors— S. H. 
Chamberlin, J. P. Moore, L. P. F. Waller, O. K. Britell 
and J. Weightmau. 

Franklin Gravel M. Co., Jan, 19. Location : Placer 
county, Cal. Capital stock, $2,000,000. Directors— 
J. D. Fry, O. F. Griffin, R. N. Graves, J. Sharon and L. 
A. Booth. 

Central Comstock M. Co., Jan. 19. Location: Lyon 
county, Nevada. Capital stock, $11,000,000. Direc- 
tors — Oliver Eldridge, A. B. Forbes, G. Atkinson, A. 
Wartz and James Duffy. 



Ask the Mothers. — Women have better opportuni- 
ties for observing the effects of medicine than men. 
This is especially true of mothers, who note with a 
keenness born of afiectiod, the operation of the reme- 
dies they administer to their children. Now ask any 
mother who has used Hale's Honey of Horehound and. 
Tar in her family as a cure for cough, colds, hoarseness, 
whooping cough, croup or influenza, what she thinks of 
it. The answer, in every instance, will be that she has 
found it the most effective preparation of its kind she 
has ever tried or heard of. 

Pike's Tooth-Ache Drops— Cure in one minute. 



>atents & Inventions. 



A Weekly List of U. S. Patents 
sued to Pacific Coast Inventors. 



Is- 



[From Official Kefobtb fob the Mining and Scien- 
tific; Press, DEWEY & CO., Publishers and 
U. S. and Foreign Patent Agents.] 

By Special Dispatch. Bated Washing-ton, 
D. 0., Jan. 19th, 1875. 

Foe Week Ending Jan. 5th, 1875.* 

Suspension Buckle. — Edwin J. Eraser, S. F., 

Cal. 
Amalgamator. — Edwin J. Frazer, S. F., Cal. 
Pump. — Lewis Goodwin, Gold Hill, Nevada, 

and Samuel A. West, S. F., Cal. 
Gang Plow. — Christian Myers, Marysville, 

Cal. 

Kotakt Plow. — William H. Foye, S. F., 
Cal. 



-John P. Sohmitz, S. F., 



Stench Tbap. 
Oal. 



Tback Cleaber for Habvesters.— Oria Du 

Bois, San Jose", Cal. 
Apparatus for Compacti'-q Granular Sugar 

into Blocks. — August F. W. Partz, Oaklaud, 

Cal. 
Compacting Sugar into Blocks. — August F. 

W. Partz, Oakland, Cal. 



Coal Screen and Chute.- 
S. F., Cal. 



-Martin E. Roberts, 



METALS. 

Wednesday m, 

American Pig Iron,^ ton 

Scotch Pig lron,'$ ton 

White PiK, $* ton 

Oregon Pig, ^ ton 

Refined Bar, bad assortment. iR lb 

Refined Bar, good assortment, ^ lb 

Boiler, No. 1 to 4 

Plate, No. 5 to 9 

Sheet, No. 10 to 13 t.... 

Sheet, No. 14 to 20 

Sheet, No. 24 to 27 

Horae Shoes, per keg 

Nail Rod 

Norway Iron 

Rolled Iron 

Other Irons for Blacksmiths, Miners, etc 
OOPPEK.— 

Braziers' 

Copper Tin'd 

O.Niel'sPat 

Sheathing. 3* lb 

Sheathing, Yellow 

Sheathing, Old Yellow 

Composition Nails J 

Composition Bolts 

Tin Plates.— 

Plates, Charcoal, IX ^ box 

PlateB, I COhareoal 

Rood nc Plates * 

BancaTiQ, Slabs, ft lb. 

Steel.— English Oast, ft lb ,... 

Anderson A Woods' American CaBt. 

Drill 

Flat Bar 

Plow Steel T. . . 

Zinc 

/.inc. Sheet 

Nadls— Assorted sizes 

Quicksilver, per ft 



Jan. 20, 
42 00 




LEATHER. 



Wednebdat m., Jan. 20, 1875. 

Utty Tanned Leather, '# lb... 26@29 

Santa Omz Leather, ft lb 26@29 

Country Leather, ftb 24@2S 

Stockton Leather, ft lb 25@29 

Jodot, 8 Kil., per doz $50 00@ 5400 

Jodot. 11 to 13 Kil.. per doz 68 OOftb 79 00 

Jodot 14 to 19 Kil., per doz 82 00@94 00 

Jodot, second ohoicB, 11 to IH Kil. ft doz 57 OOfcu 74 00 

Oornellian, 12 to 16 Ko 57 00® 67 00 

Cornell ian Females, 12 to 13 A3 OOfrz) 67 00 

Cornellian Females. 14 to- 1G Kil 71 iK*@ 76 50 

Simon Ullmo Females, 12 to 13, Kil 60 G0@ 6a 00 

Simon Ullmo Females, 14 to 15, Kil 70 00® 72 "0 

Simon Ullmo Females, 16 to 17, Kil 73 00i$ 75 00 

Simon, IS Kil.,% doz 61 00@ 63 i'0 

Simon, 20 KiL ft doz 65 00® 67 00 

Simon. 24 Kil. ft doz 72 00® 74 00 

Robert Calf, 7 and 9 Kil 35 00® 40 00 

French Kips, ft lb 1 00a 1 15 

California Kip, ft doz 40 00®] 6*- » 

FrenohSheep, all colors, ft doz 8 00® 15 00 

Eastern Calf for Backs, ft lb 100® 1 25 

Sheep Roans for Topping, all colors, ft doz 9 00® 13 00 

Sheep Roans for Linings, ft doz 5 50® 10 SO 

California Rnssett Sheep Linings....* 1 75® 4 50 

BeBt Jodot Calf Boot Lsgs, ft pair 5 00® 5 25 

Good French Calf Boot Legs, ft pair 4 00® 4 75 

French Calf Boot Legs, ft pair 4 00® 

Harness Leather, ft ft 30® 37 S 

Fair Bridle Leather, ft doz 48 00® 72 00 

Skirting Leather, ft A 33® 37« 

Welt Leather, ft doz 30 00® 50 00 

Buff Leather, ft foot 17® 

Wax Side Leather, ft foot 17(5 

Eastern Wax Leather — ® — 




THE AMERICAN 

TURBINE 

Water Wheel. 



Power Pledgred Equal to 

any Over-shot Wheel 

Ever Built. 



Recently improved and submitted to thorough scien- 
tific tests by James Emerson, showing the following 
useful effect of the power of the water utilized, being 

THE HIGHEST RESULTS EVER KNOWN. 

Percentage of part gate, % 50.08; J$ 69,fi4; % 78.73 
"i 82.53; % 82.90. Percentage of whole gate, 83.14. 
Mr. Emeraou says: " These are the "best aver- 
age results ever given by any Turbine Wheel 
in my experience." 

A splendidly illustrated descriptive catalogue, or any 
farther information desired, furnished on application to 

TREAD WELL & CO., 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Sole Agents for the Pacific States and Terrltorlee. 
18v29-eow-tf 



January 23, 1875.] 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



53 



W 



JOINING gUMMARY. 



The followtnir is mostly condensed from joamaln pub- 
lUhed in theintorior.in proximity to tbomioen ni«ntiontf 1 . 



California. 

AMADOR COUNTY. 

Rush Gravel Mines. — Jackson. (Amador) 
Dispatch, Jan. 1G: Messrs. Batterfield, Ryan, 
Pawling, aud some four or five others of onr 
citizens hare been prospecting a gravel claim 
of tiboiu forty acres, about three mil .'8 below 
this place, which has every indication of en- 
riching its owners. The paying gravel is from 
ten to forty feet thick, and extends over the 
entire 40 acres; and in prospecting, good colors 
were found in. every pan. The owners tire now 
making preparations for conducting water from 
the Amador Ganal to the claim, in order to suc- 
cessfully aud thoroughly develop the same. 
There is also another claim of forty acres, just 
below aud adjoining the claim above mentioned, 
belonging to the Messrs. Morrow, which is said 
to be equally rich and valuable. We hope the 
owners of these mines will not delay the noble 
work of operating them ou an extensive scale, 
as there can be but little doubt as to their ex- 
tent and richness. 
ALPINE COUNTY 

A Question. — Alpine Chronicle, Jan. 0: The 
Leviathan mine having been relocated, the 
manager bus submitted the c*se to the Com- 
missioner of the General Land Office. The 
point raised is this: Th it the party iu charge 
of the mine had orders to work it, and the 
manager supposed the work was going on, but 
it was not, and during the temporary absence 
of the person having charge, it was relocated. 
The question at issue is: Can employees thus 
sacrifice the interests of innocent parties ? 

Mill Site. — On Saturday last a mill site was 
located on Silver Creek for the Occident, late 
Bippon mine. 

Relocated. — On the 1st instant the Morning 
Star mine was relocated, and on the 2d, the 
Leviathan mine was also jumped. 
COLUSA COUNTY. 

Roads. — Oolnsa San, Jan. 16: As Boon as the 
weather will permit in the Spring, the Abbott 
and Buckeye Mining companies intend to build 
a good road from Sulphur Creek to Lower 
Lake. These mines will then be within fifty 
or tifty-fi ve miles of Calistoga, and there will 
be a magnificent road all the way. The dis- 
tance from Colusa to Sulphnr Creek is about 
thirty-three miles, and thirty-five to the Aboott, 
aud a miserable road to travel over. These 
mines will have to build a road to the Lake to 
get timber, and they will not build it on to the 
Sacramento Valley. At present Grizzly Canon 
pretty much stops all travel beyond the Abbott, 
but once a good road made through that and 
away goes the trade of all that region, unless 
Colusa and those interested along the way 
build a good road to Sulphur Creek. 
CALAVERAS COUNTY 

San Bruno — Calaveras Chronicle, Jan. 16; 
The work of putting an engine and hoisting 
works undergound, in the San Bruno mine at 
Mosquito, is completed and sinking com- 
menced. The engine is placed in the lower 
tunnel of the mine, about 500 feet in from the 
mouth, a large room having been hollowed out 
of the solid rock for its reception. The smoke- 
stack of the engine extends to the upper tun- 
nel, a hundred feet or more above, and as there 
is a powerful draft between the two tunnels it 
is thought there will be no inconvenience from 
heat or smoke. The object is to work the mine 
by means of a shaft sunk from the lower tun- 
nel, the engine being necessary to keep the 
works free of water and hoist the roek. The 
ore in the bottom of the tunnel is very rich, 
and the owners of the mine think it can be got 
out cheaper in the manner adopted than by 
driving a level to tap the lode lower. The ma- 
chinery has not been started yet, its assist- 
ance not being required until the shaft reaches 
a considerable depth. The result of this novel 
mode of working the mine is awaited with in- 
terest. 

"West Point District. — The Mina Rica shaft 
lias attained the depth of 165 feet, carrying a 
large, handsome vein. The vein inclines now 
in excess of the shaft and rich develop- 
ments are looked for. A large force is em- 
ployed at sinking, running levels, and stoping. 
The mill started last Monday. The Good 
Faith tunnel is being driven now at the rate of 
7 feet every *24 hours. It is in 150 feet and the 
first of the five veins belonging to the property 
will be cut in about 40 feet farther. The Su- 
perintendent of the Josephine who was unfa- 
vorably predisposed in regard to the resources 
of this district, has been somewhat disap- 
pointed. Tb.3 main shaft is now a few feet be- 
low water level, showing ore fully five feet in 
width. The ore looks splendid, showing hand- 
some snlphurets of lead and iron, and plenty 
of free gold. A Btreak nearest the hanging 
wall and a Btreak nearest the foot wall, each 
one a foot thick, are estimated to yield not leas 
than $100 per ton; the balance, 3 feet, will 
mill in the neighborhood of $20 per ton. 
Henry & Son have started their mill and are 
now Bteadily running on ore from their mines 
on Valentine Hill. The Zicatero has struck 
better ore than ever and the working force has 
been increased. The Haskins mine at Big 
Flat yields as ricfi ore as previous. 
INYO COUNTY. 

Cinnabar Discoveries. — Inyo Independent 
Jan, 9; If Inyo county don't amount to some- 



thing it won't be because it don't possess a 
a sufficient quantity and variety of minerals 
Now comes one Mattock, a mining man of Car 
son, Nevada, with the discovery of an exten- 
sive cinnabar mine in Piute district, just east 
of Bishop oreek. We have no particulars of 
the discovery, but as it is an established fact 
that that section has a number of very fine 
gold and silver mines, aud now the quicksilver 
to work them right at haud, that end of the 
county ought to maintain its balance of power 
very easily. 

Pine Mountain. — We have Borne very flatter- 
ing reports of late developments and discov- 
eries at Pine Mountain. Eph Harrington, 
whose geueral knowledge of the mines of this 
region is very complete, aud whose judgment is 
second to none, is confident thisis going to prove 
itself the "king district" of this entire 
country. Broder & Moffat fully intend to have 
a furnace in operation there iu a short time. 
Ther6 is euough ore now ou the several dumps 
to keep a furnace running a long time. 

Widening:.— Superintendent Todd informs us 
that the vein of rich black 8ulphur6ts in the 
lowei levels of the Kearsarge continues to widen 
as work progresses. We also bear that a heavy 
force will be put to work on thn mine early in 
the Bpriug. 

Across the River— Mr. Messenger, of San 
Francisco, has been examiuing and reporting 
upon some of tbe old original mining locations 
in the foothills of the Inyo range across the 
river. May of these were of the case knife, 
strata order, bearing exceedingly limited 
amounts of intractible ore, the location and at- 
tempted workings of which date back to the 
days of '63, when they built costly mills before 
obtaining the somewhat necessary mine. But 
all accounts agree that a mile or so back from 
the seams in the main mountains there is an 
extensive and rich mineral belt— so that by a 
little energy and perseverance there would have 
been no occasion for the final downfall Owens- 
ville, Crysopolis, Bend City, San Carlos, etc. — 
all of which once lively places, before and dur- 
ing the Indian war are now numbered among 
the things that were. 

M EDO CI NO COUNTY. 

Ukiah, Mendocino Democrat: About a ton of 
ore has just been shipped from the Wurtenburg 
& Burger mine, about a mile and a half from 
town, to San Francisco, for a thorough testing, 
so we may soon know fully how it is going to 
yield. 
MARIPOSA COUNTY. 

Washington Mine. — Mariposa Gazette, Jan. 
16: We understand that the managers of this 
successful and valuable mine are about con- 
tracting for six thousand oords of wood, to be 
delivered at the mill during the coming spring 
and summer, this is an inducement to wood 
choppers and teamsters, and indicates business 
and prosperity for that locality. 

NAPA COUNTY 

Calistoga. — Napa Gazette, Jan. 16: Work has 
been resumed in three tunnels of the Calistoga 
mine, but the mill is still closed. No ores are 
being hauled. 

Gold from Foss VAiLEy.— Gold bearing rock 
has been brought in from Foss valley that 
assays $800 to the ton. If subsequent assays 
confirm this some little excitement will doubt- 
less be raised. 
NEVADA COUNTY. 

Providence. — Nevada Transcript, Jan. 16': 
The Providence mine has been for a year or 
more, trying to work out a bonanza in their 
mine, and have not found the end of it yet. 
The rock is not quite as rich as that in the Cal- 
ifornia and Virginia Consolidated, but inves- 
tors in the Btock of the Providence are not in 
danger of having values fall several millions in 
a day; on the contrary the value is continually 
on the increase. 

Convenient. — The ditches which conduct 
water from the. mountains to the towns and 
mines on their lines, over on the San Juan 
Ridge, are being utilized in floating flume 
blocks from the saw-mills above, to the mines 
below. These blocks are sawed above Colum- 
bia hill, and floated down the ditch to the 
points above, and near San Juan, thereby 
saving several miles of hauling with teams. 
We presume wood can also be shipped in the 
same manner. It saves an enormous bill of 
expense, and guarantees an inexhaustible sup- 
ply of mining timber. 

Beautiful Bar. — We saw a beautiful bar of 
gold, the result of a few day's clean up of one 
of our quartz mines. The bar was valued at 
$9,000. 

Deadman's Flat.— Foothill Tidings, Jan. 10: 
Deadmau'a Fat, two or three miles south wes- 
terly from this town is getting to be a lively flat 
for prospectors. McCook Brothers and San- 
ford have been getting good pay out of the 
Pittsburg mine out there for some time, but on 
Monday last they struck it richer than ever — 
$80 to the pan. Mr. Ww. K. Spencer, the 
worthy telegraph agent here has a quartz 
claim near the Pittsbutg, which it is said to 
resemble closely and whieh we hope to see- pan- 
ning out soon. A prospecting company Btarted 
work on a new ledge near there a few dayB Bince 
and already have a good paying claim. Dead- 
man's Flat may yet prove many a live man's 
raise. 

That gold trap is in daily operation at the 
Empire mill and the inventor is sanguine of 
great success. No clean up has yet been made, 
[This item refers to the amalgamator whiohMr, 
JL'unbridge took up to Grass Valley to test at 
one of the mills. We will give the results of 
hiB work as soon as tbe new mine is cleaned 
up.— Eds. Press.] 



A 



PLACER COUNTY. 

Booth.— Placer Herald, Jan. 16: The 

-•lipse mill htn bten pouudiug for some time 
ou rock from tbe Booth mine, but a crack dis- 
covered in the bottom of one of the batteries, 
by which the amalgam was beiDg wasted, 
OftQsed the mill to be stopped for a short time, 
aud necessitated a clean-up sooner than was 
calculated on. At the time of the clean-up 
there had been about 100 tons of rock crushed, 
from which was obtained 137% ounces of gold. 
From the damaged battery, which is }-« heavier 
than the other, aud must have crushed ] > more 
rock, there was obtained l 4 less gold, proving 
that enough was wasted to have raised the 
yield of the rook to nearly or quite $30 a ton, 
which is decidedly an encouraging figure, es- 
pecially wheu we consider the size of the ledge 
from which it is obtained. 

Business. — The Greene mining company is 
rushing things iu a business like way, which 
would lead us to infer that they have struck a 
bonanza. The old water-power mill belonging 
to the company is being torn down, and a fine 
new mill, to be driven by steam power is being 
erected uear the hoisting works. With this 
improvement completed the company will be 
in a condition second, perhaps, to none in the 
county to work a quartz mine to advantage. 
And they have the mine to work. Betweea 200 
and 300 tons of rich ore is already on the 
dump, awaiting the completion of this new 
mill. 
SANTA CLARA COUNTY. 

Otm Mineral Wealth. — San Jose Mercury, 
Jan. 16: It has long been believed that Santa 
Clara county possessed mineral wealth in some 
degree, but to what extent but little has been 
known from the fact that scarcely anything has 
been done towards the development of her 
mines. The belief of those who held that de- 
posits of various kinds of ore could be found in 
our bills has been confirmed by recent discov- 
eries. In addition to our valuable quicksilver 
mines, there are many traces of iron, lead, 
coal, and even gold and silver and other rich 
minerals. Of silver and lead a rich discovery 
has already been made, and there are places 
where there are fine prospects for gold, both 
quartz and placer. At Steven's creek, west of 
the valley, there are fine indications for the 
latter. At the head of the stream several 
Mexicans are now at work, and we are told by 
responsible parties that they are making on an 
average $3 per day. If properly developed, 
we doubt not our mineral resources would con- 
tribute largely to our wealth. 
SONOMA COUNTY.l 

Valuable Discoveby. — Sonoma Democrat, 
Jan. 16: Ahout two thousand feet east of the 
Moulton mine, on J. A. Carrie's place, near Clo- 
verdale, Tom Thompson, Dr. Sarnie, John 
Field and others, have located a new mine 
which promises to be of great value. Tom 
Thompson, of Cloverdale, was the discoverer. 
In the gulch near the reservoir, the ledge is 
said to show very plain. The outcrop is pro- 
nounced by experts to be first-class, and the 
general impression is that the mine will prove 
immensely valuoble. 

Quicksilveb Locations. — The law regulat- 
ing the location of quicksilver claims provides 
that the greatest quantity that can be located 
by any one person, or by any association of 
persons, is fifteen hundred feet on the ledge, 
together with a surface location of three hun- 
dred feet on each side of the ledge. Parties 
intending to work a claim as a company should 
make their locations as individuals before form- 
ing their company, otherwise they will be lim- 
ited to a single individual's allowance. A "dis- 
coverer" is entitled to no more than any other 
person, whether he has a family or not. 
SIERRA COUNTY. 

Struck It Rich. — Mountain Messenger, Jan. 
16 : Jack Hardy has found rich diggings in his 
claim at Chapparral Hill. Jack deserves to be 
rewarded for years of unremunerative prospect- 
ing in this ground, and his many friends hope 
that he has at last struck a good lead. 

Pubchased. — J. Denoon, the superintendent 
of the Empire, Howland Flat, has bought the 
Phoenix mine, at Hepsidam, for $7,000. Jim, 
we trust this may prove a profitable investment. 

Paying Well. — The Empire claim, at How- 
land Flat, is steadily turning oat large amounts 
of gold, with no prospect of any cessation in 
the yield. 
SISKIYOU. 

Gold Pbospects. — Yreka Journal, Jan. 2: 
Sam Jackson informs us that there is a hill 
near Maxwell's mill, at the head of Shasta 
valley, over all parts of which a goid prospect 
can be obtained. He further says there are 
very large quartz ledges in the vioinity. He 
thinks it not improbable that the hill would 
pay for working by hydraulic prooess. The 
matter is at least worth the attention of pros- 
pectors. 
TUOLUMNE COUNTY. 

Lady Washington.— Tuolumne Inddpendent, 
Jan. 16 : Shaft iB now down 140 feet below the 
tunnel level, being at a point 300 feet below the 
surface. The rock looks better as they sink, 
and they have now a three-foot vein which 
prospects splendidly. The intention is to put 
the shaft down 200 feet further— making 500 
feet from the surface; and if the rock at that 
depth shows as good as at present, the shaft 
will still continue its prospecting journey 
towards the center of the earth. 

Nevada. 

WASHOE DISTRICT. 

Ophib.— Gold Hill News, Jan. 14th: Daily 
yield, 260 tons, taken from the 1300 and 1465- 



fc levels, and the stopes aud floors between. 
The north winze below the 1465-ft level con- 
tinues in very rich ore, and the same may be 
said of the cross-cuts from tbe winze below this 
level, near the Cslifornia line. The cross-cuts 
east from the 1465-ft level having gone consid- 
erably beyond the ore body are in the east coun- 
try rock. with occasional seams of low grade ore, 
eacouragiug further explorations iu that direc- 
tion. 

Consolidated Vibginia — Daily yield, 425 
tons, from the 1300 to the 1550-ft levels, exclu- 
sive. The ore breasts aud stopes throughout 
never looked so well. The winze ou the 
1550-ft level has been sunk several feel since 
last report and continues in ore of very high 
grade. The north drift has been extended 
through the mine into the Califoruia some 35 
feet, and continues iu very excellent ore. 

Beloheb. — Daily yield, 400 tons, from the 
old ore sections. Nothing new to report from 
the winzes below the 1400-f t level ; they all 
continue in good ore, and it remains for the 
drift, now being run from the main incline into 
the 1500-ft level to develop the true value of 
that level. 

Califobnia.—AU the crosscuts ou the 1400-ft 
level are looking exceedingly well, crosscut No. 
1 being in a vein of ore of exceeding richness, 
assaying over $300 per ton on the average. 
Judging from the levels below, this vein must 
be of great width. The ore in the various 
crosscuts on the 1500-ft level is identical in ap- 
pearance and value with that found in crosscut 
No. 1, atthe southern b mndary. The ore in 
the face of the breasts in all the crosscuts is 
of a very high grade. 

Geobgia. — This mine lies between the Kock 
Island and Florida, upon the south side of the 
American Flat division of the great Comstock. 
It is an old location, and the old tunnel and 
winze which have been lying idle for years 
past are now, under the new proprietorship, 
being reopened and worked, with a view to 
ascertaining the situation and dip of the ledge, 
preparatory to sinking a first-clsss working 
shaft. 

Justice. — The station at the fourth level of 
the main Justice shaft is well opened, and the 
connection with the drift north from the Waller 
Defeat shaft will be made very shortly. 

Julia. — Shaft still sinking at a lively rate , 
with the bottom in soft porphyry, clay and 
quartz. The south drift at the 1000-ft level 
shows decided improvement. 

Leo. — The face of the tunnel is now in 
quite soft ledge matter. The ledge is over fonr 
feet wide, and steadily improving in character 
as headway is made. The prospects are very 
favorable for developing a rich body of ore 
soon. 

Eubopa. — The winze below th; tunnel, at the 
west side of the vein is now down 82 feet. At 
the depth of 100 feet it is proposed to crosscut 
east into the vein, to ascertain its value and 
dip at that point. 

Gould & Cubby. — The double winze sunk 
from the 1000-ft level has reached the 1700-ft 
level, and the work of drifting south to con- 
nect with the main incline is making good 
headway. 

Flibida.— New shaft down 355 feet to-day, 
with the bottom in hard blasting rock, with 
fine looking stringers of quartz, dipping east 
and showing considerable improvement as 
farther sunk upon. 

Loweb Comstock.— Work is about being re- 
sumed on this old claim at Silver City, under 
the superintendence of Capt. Sam Cnrtis. A 
deep shaft is to be sank, with a crosscut at the 
bottom through the lode. The old workings, 
although developing good bunches of ore giv- 
ing high assays, were not deep enough for a 
good concentrated ledge. 

Caows Point.— Daily yield, 500 tons. Noth- 
ing new in the crosscuts east at the 1500-ft 
level, or other prospecting movements at that 
or other levels of the mine. The main incline 
is sinking deeper very satisfactorily, and the 
1600-ft level is being opened. The ore breasts 
and stopes of the old regular working levels 
are looking and yielding finely as usual. 

Chollab-Potosi.— Daily yield, 40 tons. Car 
sample assays $36 per ton, showing a slight 
improvement in the quality of the ore extract- 
ed. Prospeoting operations going ahead as 
usual. 

Silveb Hill.— The drift* both north and 
south at the third level show considerable im- 
provement in the way of good pay ore. 

Woodville. — The new shaft is making excel- 
lent progress downward, the rock improving 
all the time, and works operating finely. The 
ore sections yield enough to keep the mill run- 
ning steadily. .... . .. . 

Buckeye.— The material being sunk through 
at the lower end of the incline indicates close 
proximity to the ledge. 

Lady Washington— The station for the 300- 
ft level is being opened. Sinking the shaft 
below this point, however, will be suspended, 
but it will be continued down to see if good ore 
developments cannot be found, similar to that 
iu the neighboring mine, the Justice. 

Hale & Nobcboss.— Daily yield, about 100 
tons, from the upper workings. On the 2100 ft 
level they are extending the cross-cuts weBt 
from the main incline, and making good pro- 



Baltimobe. — Work is temporarily suspended 
at the 750ft level, but drifting will be resumed 
in a couple of days. The new and powerful 
hoisting and pumping machinery for this mine 
is on its way. . 

Yellow Jacket.— The main incline is sink- 
ing at a good rate of progress, and the various 
prospecting drifts at the lower levels are going 
ahead. 



54 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



Kern County Mines. 

The Kern County Courier says: Not long 
aftei the era of quartz mining in this State it 
was found that an immense vein of this min- 
eral extended from the southern confines of 
Slariposa to the northern limits of Amador 
county. In some places it was a solid lead of 
from thirty to seventy feet in thickness, and in 
some cases it ramified into numerous strata or 
branches separated by the country rock. Many 
parte of this vein, or vein system, was found 
to be rich, and all the valuable mines of Mari- 
posa, Tuolumne, Calaveras and Amador are 
located thereon; and, in process of time it was 
found that all leads of gold bearing quartz that 
had no connection with this great mother lode 
were not permanent, and that, however rich 
they might be, they were sure to "peter" out. 
Experts in deciding upon the value of any new 
discovery made the matter of its connection 
with the mother lode one of the first subjects 
of consideration. Their judgment almost inva- 
riably conformed to the way this was decided. 
The fact that the mother lode was believed not 
to extend south of Mariposa long exerted a pre- 
judicial influence to the miningjinterests of this 
county, preventing investments of capital ade- 
quate to their development, although it was ad- 
mitted in no part of the State were external in- 
dications more favorable. But of late, as the 
country has been more thoroughly explored, 
this unfavorable judgment is found not to be 
sustained by facts. A great mother lode — a 
true fissure vein — has been distinctly traced, 
not ody entirely across this county, but well 
into the counties of San Bernardino and 
Tulare, and if it is not an extension of that to 
the northward it is a similar and more exten- 
sive one, giving the same or even greater 
promise ol permanence to miniog operations 
on the line of its course. In this county sev- 
eral valuable discoveries have been made upon 
it, chief of which is the Big Blue or Sumner 
mine, at Kernville, but there are half a dozen 
others that will prove just as permanent and 
valuable in the same stage of development, at 
Hot Spring Valley, Walker's Basin and Teha- 
chepi. An expert who has devoted much time 
to an examination of this great mother lode, 
recently gave it as his deliberately formed opin- 
ion that Kern county is the best gold mining 
region in the State. This we have always be- 
lieved, and predict in less than five years there 
will be a half dozen mines in operation, as pro- 
ductive, extensive, and enjoying the same con- 
fidence of capiital as that at Kernville, afford- 
ing an insatiate market for home produce, and 
enhancing the value of farming lands to un- 
precedented figures. There is danger, as things 
look now, of an over-production of silver, but 
not of gold. We contemplate the vast deposits 
of this precious metal in Kern county with 
profound pleasure and hope, undisturbed by 
the most distant and intangible apprehension. 

Waste. 

Everybody knows that a great deal of gold 
and silver are, every year, wasted from our 
mines and mills. No process of working has 
yet been found which will save all of the pre- 
cious metals. Improvements in saving have 
been made every year and perfection is being 
gradually approximated to, and may, some day 
be attained. But the waste has been very 
great. We venture to say that the tailings 
which overspread, the farms below, and which 
the classical grangers call "slickens," are rich 
in gold and silver, not to speak of the quick- 
silver. It will pay somebody, some of these 
days, to work portions of these "slickens" for 
the metals they contain. A few days ago a 
gentleman who is sojourning here and who has 
a machine for saving gold, after one of our best 
mills has got done with its slimes, casts his eye 
on the big pile of sulphurets which have been 
put through the chlorination process of work- 
ing. He thought there might be something of 
value in those cast aside sulphurets. He ac- 
cordingly made a careful assay of some samples 
taken from one of these piles. His assay 
showed a value of $15 per ton, in silver. The 
chlorination process has taken the gold out of 
those sulphurets but had left the silver in them. 
The same gentleman will make still further 
assays from those old sulphuret piles, with a 
view to extracting the silver that is in them, by 
some cheap and rapid process of working. 
Those sulphurets have been used somewhat ex- 
tensively as a paint, and they make an excellent 
fire-proof paint, and yet they are worth about 
$15 a ton for silver. That waste is likely soon 
to be corrected. — Grass Valley Union. 

Scorpion. — This is a '59 location, and qne of 
the oldest on the Comstoct lode. It is sit- 
uated north and east of the Union Consolida- 
ted ground, directly on the curve which the 
lode is supposed to make toward the east, at 
the north end, as shown by the recent ore de- 
velopments in Consolidated Virginia, California 
and Ophir. There are 4,000 feet and 40,000 
shares in the claim. The stock is concentrated 
in strong hands, and is quoted on the stock 
board at §5 per share. A tunnel 1,200 feet in 
length has been run on the ledge, and cross- 
cuts and winzes are now being made to deter- 
mine the character and dip of the vein at that 
point. B-. N. Graves has been appointed Su- 
perintendent, and the explorations now going 
on are for the purpose of guiding him on the 
selection of a suitable location for permanent 
works and a main shaft. 



About $16,000 was cleaned up at the Virtue 
mill, near Baker City, Oregon, during the 
month of December. 



Alameda Coal Mines. 

Livermore Coal Mine. 

Work is still progressing in the tunnel ap- 
proaching the main strata. 

Black Hawk Mine. 

The tunnel in this mine has progressed about 
forty feet, with very encouraging prospects. 
An offer has been made from San Jose of cap- 
ital to develop the mine. 

A New Mine. 

A prospecting tunnel has been opened near 
Sunol, and a sample of the coal has been sent 
to San Francisco for testing its qualities. 
H. A. Coal Mine. 

The work on this mine is suspended for the 
present. The present issue of pro-rata shares 
are all taken up, and work will be again com- 
menced in the spring. Mr. Wm. P. Canttey, 
a former superintendent of a mine in Pennsyl- 
vania, has made an examination of this mine, 
and reports that the shale covering is now being 
taken from the coal strata or bed. He speaks 
very favorably of the mine. He was so favor- 
ably impressed that he at once took sixty shares 
of the stock. 

Contra Costa Mine. 

Work is suspended on this mine preparatory 
to opening the tunnel 300 feet below the present 
prospeoting tunnel. The prospects above war- 
ranting the extra outlay of a new tunnel. 
Ethel Coal Mine. 

This mine is located on a branch of the San 
Leandro creek, about a mile above the Chabot 
water works. A tunnel is being opened 16 
feet wide and eight feet high; and although 
but a few feet into the hill, good prospects have 
been struck. The line of this coal strata has 
been surveyed, and passes directly through the 
H. A. and Black Hawk mines. 
Grass Valley Mine. 

Work in this mine is suspended until the ap- 
plication to the Government for condemnation 
of the land for mineral purposes is granted. 
Prospecting has been going on for the past 
week in the hill below San Leandro for coal 
deposits. Coal croppings have recently been 
discovered on Luce and Call's places, above 
Haywood. An offer has been made to 
Thomas Heller of a thousand dollars, to be 
taken in shares, if he will open the coal mine 
on his place.— Oakland Trnascript. 



The Alta gravel lead seems to be a pretty 
hard thing to follow up or find. Several nice 
fortunes have already been taken out of the 
deposits opened and worked thereon, and, con- 
sidering that it is a well defined ancient river 
bed, and must be continuous above and below 
the part opened, there is every reason to be- 
lieev there are several fortunes left, Clendenin, 
who has had an experience of over twenty years 
in this kind of mining, and has made the 
subject a special study for over twelve years 
past, says there are six more deposits on the 
Alta lead near Grass Valley, just as good 
as the No. 2 was, and he seems very certain 
that he has the knowledge of their whereabouts 
and can put men on the track thereof, so that 
no great waste of labor and money need be 
made in opening them up. As there has 
been much work thrown away in useless search 
for the channel and lead above and below the 
discovery claim, would it not be well to listen 
to the old man a little? He may not be so 
crazy on the subject as many put him up for. 
He has a claim himself that he is sure he can 
reach the cannel in by running 100 feet more 
of tunnel, and being unable to prosecute the 
work alone, he offers a good lay-out to capital 
or labor to come in and help him through. He 
says there is a fortune for two in that claim, 
and a very small sum will enable him to reach 
it. — Foothill Tidings. 



The Consolidated Virginia Mill. — Persons 
who visit the new mill of the Consolidated 
Virginia mining company, the sound of which 
is like music, and whoBe sixty stamps do not 
make as much noise as many five-stamp mills, 
should not confine their observations to the re- 
ducing works alone, but should pass down the 
hill and see the extensive preparations being 
made to save the tailings. Walls of earth have 
been raised around two large excavations, which 
are now blue lakes of liquid debris and pulver- 
ized ore, which is now continually flowing into 
them from the settlers. But the operations do 
not terminate here. Wooden sluices are being 
extended as far as the mouth of the old Latrobe 
tunnel, several hundred feet further down the 
hill where a large reservoir has been enclosed 
into which the refuse of the mill will flow and 
deposit what tailings it contains before it finally 
escapes down Six-Mile Canon. A large force of 
men are engaged in completing the worts and 
several teams are hauling lumber for their 
construction. A long trestlework is being 
built with a flat surface, divided by longitudinal 
strips of wood. Upon this blankets will be 
spread to catch the metal as the tailings flow 
over them. No experienced person can view 
without admiration the perfection of the new 
mill in every department and the close atten- 
tion paid to detail. The building itself and the 
operations connected with reducing the ore oc- 
cupy several acres of ground, every foot of 
which is economized for some useful purpose. 
When thoroughly completed the establisnment 
will be superior in many respects to any other 
silver-bearing quartz mill in existence in this or 
any other mining country. — Virginia Chronicle, 
Jan. nth. 



Mica Mines in North Carolina. 

The discovery of a valuable deposit of mica 
in Nevada recently, renders the. following facts 
in regard to the only other mines known in 
this country, of interest. The Scientific Amer- 
ican says: 

Among the most interesting relics of the 
mysterious race of mound builders, who occu- 
pied the Mississippi valley previous to the ad- 
vent of the more barbarous Indians, are numer- 
ous ornaments of mica. Like the weapons of 
hammered copper from Lake Superior, the 
shells from the Gulf of Mexico, the implements 
of Mexican Btone and of Missouri iron, these 
plates of a mineral not found in the great val- 
ley, give a plain hint of the extensive commer- 
cial relations of these prehistoric people. 

Mica was evidently mined in Western North 
Carolina, where their long abandoned workings 
have lately been reopened, and made the scene 
of a very modern enterprise. Seven years or 
so ago, a prominent citizen of North Carolina 
set some laborers to work in one of the ancient 
mines, in search of silver, supposing that 
metal to have been the one sought for by the 
original miners. A considerable quantity of 
mica was thrown out, but its value was not 
recognized until a sample, which had been sent 
to Knoxville, as a curiosity, was seen by a Mr. 
Clapp, who followed up the clue and leased the 
mine for its mica, and revived an industry 
which has added immensely to the wealth of 
the region. The mine is known as Blaylock's, 
about twelve miles from Bakersville, the county 
seat of Mitchell couuty. Four or five other 
ancient mines have since been re-opened in the 
same neighborhood, besides many new ones in 
the same and adjoining counties. 

The mica trade has given general occupation 
to the population of Mitchell county, and has 
mado money plentiful and thereby enabled the 
county to pay off its indebtedness, wh.ich it 
otherwise would have been unable to do. Mines 
have also been opened in Yancy, Heywood, 
Burcome, McDowell and other counties. The 
business is still in its infanoy, and the methods 
of mining are exceedingly primitive, yet the 
amount of mica produced is more than enough 
to supply the large and growing demand for the 
article. Dealers and manufacturers supply the 
mines with" patters ranging in size from 2 by 3 
inches up to 15 inches square, according 
to which the mica is prepared for market. The 
dark or brandy colored mica brings the best 
price. Associated with the mica is an abun- 
dance of decomposed snow-white felspar, which 
will, no doubt, be utilized in time, for the man- 
ufacture of porcelain. 



The New Oregon Mines. — Mrs. Heard re- 
ceived letters the first of the present week from 
her husband at the New Oregon mines on 
Rogue river near the mouth of Galice creek. He 
thinks the mines, without question, are ex- 
tremely rich. Owing to the bad weather and 
lack of facilities of all kinds, but little work 
will be done in the way of developing them till 
spring. However considerable work is being 
done in the way of taking out quartz to be 
crushed when mills shall be erected. One mill 
has already been ordered and will be up and 
ready for use by spring. The place is yet with- 
out hotels for the accommodation of people or 
stables for the accommodation of horses. Mr. 
Heard has taken up two claims on the ledge 
and a land claim in the vicinity for a farm . The 
country iB, we understand, very mountainous, 
but has, notwithstanding, small bits of land 
here and there on the streams adapted to agri- 
cultural and grazing purposes. Mr. Heard's 
account of the richness of the mines, the 
prospects of the district, and "of his own pros- 
pects in particular are quite flattering, but 
we hope not more so tnan future developments 
will justify. — Treka Journal. 



Sitka Mines. — The Portland (Oregon) Bulle- 
tin says: J. H. Fisk, the well known assay er of 
this city, is corresponding with parties who 
have been engaged in prospectining and min- 
ing on the Sitka region during the past summer. 
From a letter recently received from Sitka we 
extract the following in relation to the wonder- 
ful mine lately found: "The discoverers of the 
mine went up to it in October, but there was so 
much Bnow they had to leave. As soon as the 
snow disappears I will accompany them. They 
seem to think it a permanent discovery. * * * 
On an island in front of this place, where they 
are prospecting for coal they have struck a two- 
foot ledge, containing copper and gold. ThiB 
country is a mine of wealth, and I intend to re- 
main with it." 



Avalanches in Utah. — Dispatches from Salt 
Lake city, dated the 14th inst., say: Terrible 
snow storms are prevailing throughout the Ter- 
ritory. The canons of Cottonwood are com- 
pletely blocked with snow, and avalanches 
are occurring hourly, the citizens of Alta, Utah, 
fearing the destruction of the town from snow. 
They have guides out daily for the purpose of 
warning the people. The four men killed by 
an avalanche on Tuesday will be buried to- 
morrow, under the auspices of the Masonic 
fraternity. 



Castle Dome district, above Yuma, in Yuma 
county, Arizona, is yielding considerable ore 
and bullion. Geo. Tyng, Esq., writes us on 
December 24th, that 160 tons of ore had just 
gone to the mouth of the river for shipment to 
San FranciBco, and that 200 tons more were 
ready for shipment by the next steamer. 



Quartz Mining on South Yuba. 

From a correspondent near Washington in 
this county we learn that the well-known 
Lindsey mine in that vicinity has lately been 
incorporated under the name of the Fall 
Creek company, with Capt. Kidd Bell 
and others as Directors, and a capital stock 
of $5,500,000. It is reported that they will 
remove the mill and werks from the top of the 
hill down near the river, which will give them I 
1600 feet of ground above the tunnel to their (I 
present works, and our correspondent thinks if 1 1 
they do and select the right point and open the 
mine well, there is no trouble about making 
big dividends from this property. South of 
this ib the Yuba mine, owned by F. A. S. Jones, 
whicn is looking splendidly, having rich rock 
at the surface for 400 feet, and a tunnel driving 
in to open it up. North and south on the same 
lode are several locations of much promise, 
which our correspondent says he will mention 
at some future time. Still farther south than 
any previous locations a rich lead of quartz 
has lately been discovered by J. F. Smith. His 
ledge is about two feet thick, and the rock will 
average eighty dollars per ton. It is stated 
there that it will produce $200 rock, and our 
correspondent says "so it will, but the average 
is the thing, and what it will mill, and this can 
be put at eighty dollars." 

The California mine near Washington, is go- 
ing on nicely. The Canyon Creek is doing a 
little, and has the appearance of good rock, but 
the mill has not started up yet. The tunnel on I 
the Blue Tent ditch continues in hard rock, 
but is expected' to be through in two or three 
weekB. — Foothill Tidings. 



Cheap Boxes for Plants. 

The cost to the amateur of handling and 
potting plants in the early stages of their 
growth is trifling; but to the nurseryman, who 
carries thousands of horticultural nurslings 
through from one period of growth to another, 
the expense of boxes and pots is considerable. 
We learn, however, that some of the nursery-. 
men of Capay valley have adopted a device, 
which almost does away with this expense. 
One of them, while on a visit to Swan & Co.'gj 
Union Box Factory had his attention called to 
a method by which boxes may be formed byj 
simply folding a scored piece of board so as to 
form a box with four sides, the ends lapping, 
and requiring nothing but a string tied about 
it to constitute a box sufficiently strong for i 
nursery purposes. When the pJant is to be 
transferred from this to a larger box or to the 
garden, by simply cutting the string and un- 
folding the sides, the plant is disengaged with- 
out disturbing the earth by sliding. 

Some of these Bcored pieces were recently} 
examined by us at the above named factory. 
They were about a foot in width and longj 
enough to form a box 4x4 inches. This is tot 
be cut into three sections; each being 4 inches 
square; though the size, of course, can be 
varied; and being only the thickness of the 
common strawberry box they can easily be cut 
into sections with a pocket kn?fe. The factory 
furnishes these boards, scored and ready for 
folding, at one cent each. Thus the purchaser 
has the material for three boxes at the cost of 
one cent; and in a condition as convenient for 
transportation as a package of pasteboard. 

The New Shaft. — The new California and 
Consolidated Virginia shaft, better known as 
the C. an C. shaft, although recently com- 
menced, already begins to present the appear- 
ance of regular hoisting works. A large build- 
ing has been erected over its mouth, an engine 
is in full operation, the shaft is down a distance 
of 75 feet, and a dump-pile extends from 25 to 
30 feet down the hill, and is in miniature that 
which it will become when the shaft has been 
sunk to the required depth. There is plenty of 
room to the eastward to extend it, even should 
it iu future time equal the proportions of the 
Savage dump or that of the Gould & Curry. A 
large amount of lumber is being hauled upon 
the ground for the purpose of timbering the 
shaft, and the neighborhood exhibits a lively 
appearance. Three months ago it was one of 
the most barren localities about town, but now 
an army of workmen are engaged in the vicinity, 
the Bcream of steam-whistles and noise of en- 
gines are heard, teamsterB are making new 
roads through the sagebrush, and a portion of 
the city which was heretofore deserted and 
without attractions of any kind, has suddenly 
sprung into a new existenoe. — Virginia Chron- 
icle. 

Smelter Destroyed. — The Helena Independ- 
ent says: Cn Friday evening, about seven.' 
o'clock, the furnace situated about two miles 
from Jefferson City, was discovered to be on 
fire, and as the wind was blowing a gale at the 
time, the whole building was soon enveloped 
in names, and in a shorter time than it takes 
to write this article, all that was left of the 
Jefferson smelter was a heap of smoking ruins. 
Many of the surrounding miners were workingi 
in the expectation of selling their ores to Mr. 
Nowlan, and with some of whom we believe 
he had contracts. To these parties it will prove 
a great disappointment. 

The Correct Way. — We understand that a 
movement is on foot to thoroughly test the 
worth and value of the Santiam mines during 
the present season.. For 15 years this section 
has been scratched over after a fashion, re- 
sulting as could be expected. — Portland (0) 
Bullttin. 



January 23, 1875.) 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



55 



Qood H E 4 L TH- 



Treatment of Diptheria. 

The following rules for the prevention or 
extirpation of diptberia form the couclndiug 
sentences of a report submitted reoently by 
Dr. Stephen Smth. of the D. S. Board of 
Health. 
Precautions— The Dwelling or Apartment. 
Cleanliness in and around the dwelling, aud 
pure air in living and sleeping rooms, are of 
the utmost importance wherever auy conta- 
gions disease is prevailing, as cleanliness tends 
both to prevent and mitigate it. Every kind 
and source of filtu around and in the house 
should be thoroughly removed; cellars and foul 
areas should be cleaned and disinfected; drains 
should be put in perfect repnir; dirty walls and 
ceiling* Bhonld be lime-washed; and every oc- 
cupied room should be thoroughly ventilated. 
Apartments which have been occupied by per- 
sons sick with diptheria should be cleansed 
with disinfectants, ceilings lime-washed and 
woodwork painted, the carpets, bedclothes, up- 
holstered furniture, exposed many days to fr ah 
air and sunlight. AH articles which may be 
boiled or subjected to high degrees of heat 
should be thus disinfected. Such rooms should 
be exposed to currents of fresh air for at least 
one week before re-ocoupied. 
Well Children. 
When diptheria is prevailing, no child should 
be allowed to kiss strange children, nor those 
Buffering from sore throat (tbe disgusting cus- 
tom of compelling children to kiss every visitor 
a well contrived method of propagating 
other grave diseases than diptheria) nor should 
it sleep with or be confined to rooms occupied 
by, or use articles (as toys taken in the mouth, 
haodkerchies, etc.) belonging to children hav- 
ing Bore throat, croup or catarrh. If the 
weather is cold the child should be warmly clad 
with flannel*. 

When Diptheria is in the Family. 
The well children should be scrupulously 
kept apart from the sick, in dry and well aired 
rooms, and every possible source of infection, 
through the air, by personal contact with the 
sick and by articles used about them in their 
rooms, should be rigidly guarded. Every at- 
tack of sore throat, croup, or catarrh, should 
be at once attended to. The feeble should have 
invigorating food and treatment. 
Sick Children. 
The siok should be rigidly isolated in well 
aired (the air being entirely changed at least 
hourly) unlighted rooms the outflow of air be- 
iDg, as far as possible, through the external 
windows by depressing the upper and elevat- 
ing the lower sash, or a chimney heated by a 
fire in an open fireplace; all discharges from the 
mouth and nose should be received into vessels 
containing disinfectants, as solutions of car- 
bolic acid or sulphate of zinc, or upon cloths 
which are immediately burned, or if not burned, 
thoroughly boiled or placed under a disinfect- 
ing fluid. 



Scarlet Fever and Dyptheria. 

The prevalence of scarlet fever, and dypthe- 
ria, as an epidemic in many sections, induces 
us to call attention to the use of broma-chlo- 
raluin, as an agent for purifying the air of the 
dwellings and siok rooms by neutralizing and 
destroying at once all noxious odors and gases, 
as well as germ of disease, and putrescent par- 
ticles floating imperceptibly in the air. 

It is a concentrated solution of aluminium 
chloride and bromide, inodorous and nou pois- 
onous and after repeated trials, has been found 
to be both agreeable and potent. It promptly 
absorbs and decomposes all ammoniacal and 
noxious gaseB, and renders the atmosphere and 
surrounding objects sweet and wholesome.' It 
has been tested in such a variety of cases with 
such uniform success, that we feel warranted 
in recommending it to the public for general 
use, in all plaaes or circumstances that give rise 
to unhealthy, bad odors. 

A striking merit of bromo-chloralum is, that 
it operates by removal and not by creating an 
odor greater than the one sought to be removed. 
Can be applied m the most simple manner, di- 
recting it according to the object or locality to 
be purified. Indeed one great element of its 
success is the capability of free diffusion, caus- 
ing it to purify the air as well as the walls, 
ceilings and floors. 

For scarlet fever and other contagious dis- 
eases suspend towels in the room moistened 
with it diluted. Use freely on all bedding 
and in the chamber utensils, previous to use, 
as by this method the poison of excretions is 
neutralized. 

Also when the throat is ulcerated or inflamed, 
gargle with it diluted one to ten of water. We 
are advised that patients feel much comfort 
from the use of a dilution of one part to 12 or 
16 of watur as a wash; all speak of its soothing 
influence when applied to the burniug, itching 
surface. It neutralizes the poison, limits the 
spread of the disease. Attendants should use 
the same freely upon their clothes and person. 

For diptheria, sore throat, etc., dilute one 
part to ten of water, or stronger according to 
circumstances, aud gargle the throat when ad- 
visable, also swallow 5 to 10 drops in a teas- 
poouful of water. The general directions as to 
purifying the air of the house and room should 
be observed fully. — Journal Materia Medica. 

Castob Oil Among the Chinese. — A writer 
in the Journal of Applied Science states that 
castor oil has so little effect on Chinse intes- 
tines that the Celestials use it habitually in 
cookery. 



Artificial Fobs. — M. Tussaud, of London, 
suggests an ingenious way of preparing the 
hair or fur of animals for use without employ- 
ing the skin. The process consists in first 
soaking the fur iu lime water to loosen the ad- 
hesion of the hairs. After washing and drying, 
the piece is stretched upon a board, fur side 
Up, and a solution of glue laid over it, care be- 
ing taken not to disturb the natural position of 
tbe hairs. After the glue has hardened, the 
skin may be pulled off, leaving the ends of the 
hair exposed. The latter are then washed with 
proper substances to remove fat, bulbs, etc. 
An artificial skin of gutta percha, or other wa- 
terproof Bubstance, is next laid on top of the 
glue and allowed to dry, so as to form a con- 
tinuous menjbraue, when the glue is washed 
out with warm water. These artificial skins 
are entirely free from any animal odor, and are 
more durable, lighter, and more pliable than 
the natural ones. 



Cement fob Attaching Labels to Metal. — 
Many of our lady readers have no doubt been 
much troubled in putting up fruit, to make the 
labels stick to the tin cans. The Medical 
Journal says that a paste made as follows will 
meet the case: Ten parts tragacanth mucilage, 
ten parts honey, and one part flour. Tbe flour 
appears to hasten the drying, and renders it 
less susceptible to damp. Another cement 
that will resist the damp stid better, but will 
not adhere if the surface is greasy, is made by 
boiling together two parts of shellac, one part 
of borax, and sixteen parts water. Flour paste, 
to which a certain proportion of sulphuric acid 
has been added, makes a lasting cement, but 
the acid often aots upon the metals. 



UsEfdL IfJFOF^HTION. 



Why American Women abe Unhealthy. — If 
we trace the history of New England back a 
few generations, we find a stalwart race of 
mothers and grandmothers ; and even now 
there are specimens of these, healthy, active, 
happy, of ages varying from three-score -and- 
ten to one huudred years; and if we trace the 
history of American women from the landing 
of the Pilgrims to the advent of Dr. Clarke's 
book, we shall find the degeneracy exactly cor- 
responding with the increase of sedentary hab- 
its, fashionable dress, gormandizing on indi- 
gestible food and condiments, forced and pre- 
carious development, sensational literature, 
and dosing and drugging for the multitudinous 
ailments consequent on a mode of life which 
has so little of nature and so much of the preter- 
natural about it. Until the children and young 
women of America return to the more normal 
ways of their ancestors, they will go down, 
down, in the scale of vitality, with, or without 
co-education, or school education of any kind. 
Coeducation is one of the measures that will 
exercise a saving influence; but alone it will 
not arrest the deteriatory tendency. This re- 
quires a thorough indoctrinating into the laws 
of hygiene and their strict application to prac- 
tical life. In this, and in this only, is the 
hope, not only of American women, but of 
American men, aud, indeed, of the human 
race. — Phrenological Journal, 



Weatheb Obsebvations. — When you wish 
to know what the weather is to be, go out and 
select the smallest cloud you can see. Keep 
your eyes upon it, and if it decreases and dis- 
appears, it fchows the state of the air which will 
be sure to be followed by fine weather; but if 
it inoreases in size, take your great coat with 
you if you are going from home, for falling 
weather is not far off. The reason is this: 
When the air is becoming charged with elec- 
tricity you will see every. cloud attracting all 
lesser ones towards it, until it gathers into a 
shower; and, on the contrary, when the fluid 
is passing off or diffusing itself, then a large 
cloud will be seen breaking to pieces and dis- 
solving. 



Domestic EcofiopY- 



Useful Recipes. 

Editors Pbkbs:— I send you some cooking 
recipes which we have tried and found very 
good and they are so simple that even a dys- 
peptic could Dot object to them: 

Bbown Bread. — 1 cup of corn meal, scalded; 
1% cups graham flour; 1% cups white flour; VJ 
cup of syrup or molasses; 2 tables poonfuls 
brewer's yeast, or two-thirds cup of home- 
made yeast; a little salt and water, enough to 
make a stiff batter. Set in a warm plaoa to riie, 
and when light'bake in a hot oven in muffin 
rings or loaves, the muffin rings are best. 

Tapioca Podding.— 1 cup of tapioca and a 
teaspoon of salt; put in three large cups of 
warm water and soak three or four hours; pare 
and core enough apples to cover the bottom of 
a pudding dish, and fill the hollows whore the 
cores were taken out, with sugar and a very 
little nutmeg or cinamon; pour the tapioca over 
the apples and bake three-quarters of an hour. 
This recipe is for apples that cook easily. 
Serve with sugar, cream, or milk or a warm 
sauce. 

Cbkam Cakb. — 1 cup of sugar; 2 eggs; 1 
tablespoon of butter; beat together with a little 
salt; 4 tablespoons of water; 1 teaspoon of 
yeast powder mixed with the flour, flavor with 
lemon. This makes two cakes. The cream is 
made with one-half pint or more of milk. Heat 
the milk in a dish in a kettle of water and 
thicken with two eggs, a little salt and sugar, 
beated together, and one tablespoon of corn- 
starch mixed in a little cold milk, stir well and 
let it just come to a boil. When cold flavor 
with lemon, cut open the cakes and put the 
cream between the pieces L. 

Santa Oruz. 



m: 



Diptheria a Malabial Poison. — The micro- 
scope demonstrates that typhus and typhoid 
fevers and all their genera, diptheria, etc, are 
generated by malarial poison. New York is 
given as an example, where the sewers and 
BtoveB murder 18,000 people annually; the death 
rate being 34,000 whilst the normal rate should 
be but 11,000. The remaining 5,000 are thrown 
into other channels of murder and suicide. 
The same evil prevails throughout the territory 
we have mentioned, and we do not believe the 
Manufacturer can do a greater service to its 
readers than to urge reform in stoves, Bewers 
and ventilation. 



Measels.— The Calistoga Free Press under- 
stands that this epidemic is prevailing there, 
and has become quite wide spread. It is most- 
ly confined to children, and that which has, 
thus far, made its appearance, is of a mild type 
and readily yields to care and suitable attend- 
ance. 



Why not Eat Oystebs in Summeb? — Ac- 
cording to the popular notion; which, in the 
main, is correct, the spawning season of the 
oyster embraces those months which have no r 
in their spelling, namely: May, June, July and 
August, the four warm months in the year. 
The fact is, that oysters generally, do their 
spawning during these four months; but a few 
are liable to spawn whenever the water is warm 
enough, and large numbers pass through the 
year without) spawning; and these, were it not 
for the difficulty of assorting them, would be 
available for food at any time. But the preju- 
dice is universal against their use during the 
r-less months. That they are not in as good 
condition then as during the cooler months, is 
reasonable to suppose; but that they are all 
necessarily unwholesome in the warm months, 
is far from being proved. In business phrase, 
oysters in spawning time are said to be 'milky.' 
This means the presence of an opaline fluid in 
cunsiderable abundance, and which has to do 
with the wants of its young— perhaps, remote- 
ly, a sort of fluid of &mmoa'.—P opular Science 
Monthly. 

A New "Ratsbane." — And now the flowering 
plant "asphodel," is to drive away the rats 
wherever they may be. This is a perennial, 
but where it is to be obtained we know not. 
Perhaps at some of our seed-stores. We, how- 
ever, would not advise the destruction of all the 
cats until after a thorough trial and proof of 
the efficacy of the new "exterminator." 

[The asphodel is a fine garden bulbous plant, 
much cultivated in Europe. It has a stem 
about three feet high, thickly covered with 
thee-cornered yellow leaves. Its flowers are 
of a yellow color, reaching from near the base 
to the top of the seam. The ancients were in 
the habit of planting the flowers in burial 
places, to afford nouiishment for the Manes of 
the dead. It is said that the bulbs of some 
varieties of this plant, when dried and ground 
to powder, make an excellent glue. — Eds. 
Pbess.] 

Leatheb fbom Tbipe. — A method has been 
patented in France for preparing leather from 
tripe and other animal membranes, the leather 
thuB made to be used for glove making, etc. 

Ants, Cbickets, and other insect annoy- 
ances may be driven from their nests and holes 
by Bprinkling carbolic acid diluted with water 
around these pluces of resort. 

The Popular Science Monthly ridicules the 
idea that oysters shouldn't be eaten in the 
months that haven't an r iu them as well as in 
other months. 



The Fibst Patent. — It is said that the first 
patent issued by ths United States was granted 
to Samuel Hopkins on July 30, 1790, for the 
manufacture of pot and pearl ashes. The 
third was to Oliver Evans, of Philadelphia, so 
famous for inventions in high pressure engines, 
of whose inventions President Jefferson re- 
marked that "it was too valuable to be covered 
by a patent, and there should be no patent for a 
thing no one could afford to do without after it 
was known." This was in December of the 
same year in which Hopkins obtained his 
patent. For many years after this date the 
Patent office was hut a clerkship in the State 
department. 

Painting Old Buildings — An inexpensive 
but durable method of painting old buildings 
is as follow: First give them a' coat of crude 
petroleum, which is the oil as it comes from 
the wells, and which can be procured for four or 
five dollars per barrel. Then mix one pound 
of ' 'metallic paint, " which is brown or red hema- 
tite iron and finely ground, to one quart of 
linseed oil, and apply this over the petroleum 
coat. The petroleum sinks into the wood, and 
makes a groundwork for t ho nou and oil paint. 
The color of the iron paint is a dark reddish 
brown, and is not at all disagreeable; it is a 
color not easily soiled, very durable, and is 
fire-proof. 

Minuteness of Fuchsia Seeds. — A gentle- 
man recently visiting a fuchsia house (hot 
house) in Europe was asked to guess the 
amount of fuchsia seed gathered in one year 
from the house — 10 by 30 feet in size. Twenty, 
ten, and even as little as one pound were sug- 
gested, but the fact proved that the entire pro- 
duct was only one quarter of an ounce. The 
Garden says that Mr. Cannell's specimen 
fuchsia-house, 30 feet by 20 feet has not yet 
afforded him a quarter of an ounce in one sea- 
son. One may infer from these facts how fine 
the seed is. 



Gilding and Silveeing SilkThbead. — In a 
process that has been patented in England, gold 
or silver leaf is rubbed on a stone with honey 
until reduced to a fine powder. The silk thread is 
soaked or boiled in a solution of chloride of 
zinc, and, after being washed, it is boiled in 
water with which the gold or silver powder 
has been mixed. When washed and dried it 
will be found coated with a fine layer of gold 
or silver, which may even be polished in the 
usual manner. 

Vabnibh that will Adhebe to Metal. — In 
order to make alcholic varnish adhere more 
firmly to polished metallic surfaces, A. Morell 
adds one part of pure crystallized boracio acid to 
two hundred parts of varnish. Thus prepared 
it adheres so firmly to the metal that it cannot 
be scratched off with the finger-nail; it appears, 
in fact, like a glaze. If more boracio aoid is 
added than above recommended, the varnish 
loses its intensity of color. 

To Pbesebve Colob in Dried Flowebs.— To 
preserve the natural color in dried flowers, lay 
them when fresh into alcohol for a few min- 
utes — they will fade at first— but recover their 
color. 



Watebed Butteb. — In the course of some 
investigations made by Professors Augell and 
Hehner, England, out of analyses of fifteen 
samples of butter which were determined by 
them, twelve of the samples, which were un- 
doubtedly good butter, contained 6 to 13 per 
cent, of water; the astonishing quantity of 
42.3 per cent, was found in one sample from 
London, or an excess of about 32 per cent, of 
water, for which Londoners pay from 32 to 
48 cents per pound. Another butter from the 
same place had 21 per cent., these high ratios 
being due to the fact that the butter had been 
treated with milk. On the other hand, 
sample purchased in Yentnor was found to con- 
tain under 4 per cent, of water, aud according 
to the authors it contained 50 per cent, of for- 
eign fat. The authors also found that genuine 
butter spread out on sheets of paper and ex- 
posed for a week to the air in the laboratory 
became, so far as the senses could jmdge, indis- 
tinguishable from tallow. 



Bean Porridge. — Parboil the beans as if 
for baking; drain and put them in the liquor. 
This needs the salt earlier than the soup, and 
no flavor save the beans. Boil until the tmns 
become broken and tender, and then add 
hulled corn, or Indian meal, or both. Stir in 
the meal carefully, not to lump, or get too 
thick. When it is well cooked and seasoned 
properly, take a large spoon, and stir thor- 
oughly together. You will have a luscious 
dish, and "better when nine days old," says 
the proverb. 

A slice of a nice piece of pork is a relish in 
either of the above dishes, for the suet Bhonld 
be kept for shortening, as there is usually 
enough left in the bones for the soups. I 
never knew au edge-bone to cost more than ten 
centB, often only six cents per pound. Two or 
three good meals and pies can be obtained 
from one. The coming winter some one may 
like to try it. 

Making Coffee. — A correspondent gives this 
receipt for coffee: Use about one tablespoonful 
for each person, and one egg mixed with it. 
Place this in a. coffee-pot, put in a little cold 
water, and then the desired amount of boiling 
water; place upon the stove and let it come to 
a boil. If no egg is used, it should never boil 
over a minute. If an egg is used, it may boil 
two minutes, when it will be ready for use. 
The coffee-pot should be as close as possible, 
so as to retain the flavor. The object of using 
a little cold water is to give a little time for hot 
water to extract, its virtues before it boils. 



Botal Fbuit Cake.— Five cups of flour, five 
eggs, one and one-haif cups of sugar, one cup 
of molasses, one and one-half cups of butter, 
one teaspoonful of saleratus, one-half a cup of 
milk, two pounds of chopped raisins, three 
pounds of currants, one and one-half pounds 
of citron, two tablespoonfuls of cinnamon, one 
nutmeg, two teaspoonfuls of cloves. This is a 
splendid receipt. I have some cake now that 
I made a year ago, and it is nicer now than 
when first baked.— The Household. 



Ground Bice Gbuel. — Daisy Eyebright 
gives the following: "Boil one tableBpoonful 
of ground rice, rubbed smooth with a pint of 
cold water, in a pint and a half of milk, with 
a bit of cinnamon and lemon peel. Sweeten 
slightly, or season with salt." . 

Bake» Eggs.— Beat up six eggs, one table- 
Bpoonful of flour, six of sweet milk; melt your 
butter in the frying-pan; when hot, turn the 
whole in, well-beaten, and bake in a hot oven 



56' 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



[January 23, 1875 




W. B. EWER 8EMI0B Editob. 



IDEWEY «fe CO., purxLisliers. 



A, T. DEWEY, 
W. B. EWKB, 



GEO. H. STBONQ 
JKO. L. BOOSE 



Office, No. 224 Sansoiiie St., S. E. Corner 
of California St., San Francisco. 



Advertising 1 Rates: 
Advertising Kates.— 1 week. 1 month. 8 months. 1 year. 

Per line 25 .80 $2.00 $5.00 

One-half inch $1-00 3.00 7.60 24.00 

Oneinch 1.50 4.0Q. 12.00 40.00 



San Francisco: 

Saturday Morning, Jan. 23, 1875 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 

GENERAL EDITORIALS.— Hydraulic Mining 
in California; Nitro- Glycerine Compound; A San 
Francisco Stone Front, 49. The Mining Interests 
in 1874, 56-57-60- 

ILLTJSTRATIONS.— Welch's Pinking Iron; Nitro- 
Glycerine Igniter; Mixer for Acids and Glycerine, 
49. 

CORRESPONDENCE.— Jottings from Tybo, Ne- 
vada; Esmeralda, 50- 

SCIENTIFIC PROGRESS.— Is the Ether Matter ? 
Dangers of Benzine Scouring; Personal Equation; 
Thermo-Electricity in Iron Ships; The Artificial Va- 
nilla; Astronomical; The Physical Forces are Modes 
of Ether Pressure, 51. 

MECHANICAL PROGRESS.— InterestingSteam 
Boiler Experiment; Assembling in Machine Making; 
A Promising Invention — Re-rolling Steel Rails; Hard- 
ening the Surface of Steel, 51- 

MINING STOCK MARKET.— Thursday's Sales 
at the San Francisco Stock Board; Notices of Assess- 
ments; Meetings and Dividends; Review of Stock 
Market for the Week, 52- 

MINING SUMMARY-— From various counties in 
California and Nevada, 53. 

GOOD HEALTH. -Treatment of Diptheria; Why 
American Women are Unhealthy; Diptheria a Mala- 
rial Poison; Measels; Scarlet Fever and Dyptheria; 
Castor Oil Among the Chinese, 55. 

USEFUL INFORMATION.— Why not Eat Oys- 
ters in Summer ? A New "Ratsbane;" Leather from 
Tripe; Artificial Furs; Cement for Attaching Labels to 
Metal; Weather Observations; The First Patent; Paint- 
ing Old Buildings; Minuteness of Fuchsia Seeds; 
Gilding and Silvering Silk Thread; Varnish that 
will Adhere to Metal; To Preserve Color in Dried 
Flowers, 55. 

DOMESTIC ECONOMY.— Useful Recipes; Watered 
Butter; Bean Porridge; Making Coffee; Royal Fruit 
Cake; Ground Rice Gruel; Baked Eggs, 55. 

MISCELLANEOUS.— Kern County Mines; Waste; 
Scorpion; Alameda Coal Mines; The Consolidated 
Virginia Mill; Mica Mines in North Carolina; The 
New Oregon Mines; Sitka Mines; Avalanches in 
Utah; Quartz Mining on South Tuba; Cheap Boxes 
for Plants; The New Shaft; Smelter Destroyed; The 
Correct Way, 54. A Chapter of Tule History— 
Staten Island; Mining Accident; Arizona Mines, 58- 



A San Francisco Stone Front 

The Safe Deposit company's building now 
being erected on the southeast corner of Cali- 
fornia and Montgomery Btreeta, bids fair to be 
one of the finest in appearance in the city. It 
is to be four stories high with 137% feet front- 
age on Montgomery, and and 69 feet on Cali- 
fornia street. Its whole front will be of Frear 
stone with handsome ornamental projections 
and faoings. Last week we visited the Frear 
manufacturing works, and found over 51,000 
cubic feeii of stone already manufactured for 
this building. The total weight of Frear stone 
required for the building will be 450 tons. 

Coarser sand than usual has been used in 
the manufacture of this particular stone, 
■which gives it a nearer resemblance to natural 
stone than any of the Frear we have before 
seen. It is believed that this improves its tex- 
ture as well as its appearance. 

We cannot here describe the various orna- 
mental designs which will appear in the build- 
ing. As arranged in parts about the works, the 
ornamental pieces seem almost innumerable. 
They also appear to be in good taste, and when 
erected the structure will form an entirely 
novel piece of architecture in San Francisco. 
The oolumns are rounded. Fluted, Corinthian 
and composite capitals are employed. The 
window heads are truly ornamental and very 
bold in relief. On the right of the grand cor- 
ner window will rest a stone relief design, rep- 
resenting mining, embracing the pick, pan, 
spade and bar, etc., on the left, agriculture, 
with plow, wheel, rake, grapes, etc. Wm. Pat- 
ton is the architect. We should like hereafter 
to give a fuller d scription of his designB. 

By the manufacture of this artificial stone 
we shall see a massive and beautifully wrought 
block arise during a few months in our midst 
that would otherwise have been years in build- 
ing at more than double the cost. By the erec- 
tion of this structure the Frear stone company 
takes a front stand in our city and in our home 
manufactures. We shall be placed to see them 
maintain it. Tbey have some of the best busi- 
ness partners in San Francisco in the enterprise. 
Their Superintendent is indefatigable in his 
labors. Their works are a living example of 
home industry that ought to be liberally dupli- 
cated in this State. 

A large quantity of stone is also being turned 
out by the Frear company for the front of a new 
building on Sansome street. Portland cement 
is used exclusively in the manufacture 
of Frear stone on this coayt. Over 2.600 
barrels are now held in store by the com- 
pany. Artizaus and others who look with pride 
on such works will find the present a favorable 
time to call on Capt. Gushing at the manufac- 
tory on Bluxome street, near Fourth. 



The Mining Interests in 1874. 

The miners of the Pacific Coast never had 
more cause for congratulation in finishing a 
years work than they had in completing that of 
1874. The year has been one of hard work 
and well earned profits, and the miners may 
well look with pride on the array of figures 
representing the result of their labor. We 
have heard of successful mining ventures on 
every hand, and fewer failures than usual. 
This is due to the fact that the people on this 
coast are fast awakening to the idea that they 
must engage in mining, as they do in any other 
business, and invest their money without ex- 
citement and with judgment and forethought. 
The day has long gone by when a man can 
come to San Francisco with a few lumps of 
quartz and sell a claim for thousands of dollars. 
He must now bring the proper papers to prove 
his ownership, location, etc.," and then an ex- 
pert will accompany him to the mine and ex- 
amine it in the interest of the purchasers. It 
takes several months, as a general thing, to 
dispose of a mine in these days which, a few 
years ago, could have been sold in a week. 
This is a fact in which we really ought to con- 
gratulate ourselves as it shows that those who 
invest their money in mining property only do 
so after a thorough examination and mature 
deliberation. They will therefore work their 
property in a more legitimate manner, and 
trust less to stock-jobbing operations. 

This matter is one of more importance than 
many suppose and exercises a potent influence 
on the mining interests. With mines scattered 
all over the country, worked properly and with 
due regard for economy, money can be made 
rapidly. It will encourage capital to help out 
labor and encourage the prospectors in their 
work of hunting up new mines. 

A large number of new mines were opened 
up last year of which we will hear more in 
the future. In California and Nevada, more- 
over, particularly the former, we hear of many 
old abandoned mines being taken up again and 
reworked. In many cases costly works were 
put up years ago and mines opened by inex- 
perienced men, which were afterward aban- 
doned as failures. Many of these old locations 
are now being worked by competent men and 
made to pay well. 

The year 1874 has been marked, perhaps, for 
a lack of any of the furious "excitements" of 
former years, which lured thousands of miners 
away from steady work, paying claims, and 
comfortable cabins, to travel in search of a new 
El Dorado. The nearest approach to anything 
of this kind we have had has been the "Pana- 
mint excitement" but this was a very mild 
form of the disease compared with previous 
epidemics. Moreover, Panamint, was com- 
paratively "get-at-able," and not such a dis- 
tance from ordinary mining centers as Fraser 
Kiver, Stickeen, etc. 

We have had few mining accidents of large 
proportions; that of the fire in the Belcher air 
shaft on the Comstock, by which several lives 
were lost being the most important. We have 
been compelled, however, to chronicle from 
week to week during the year, many accidents 
by which precious lives were lost. These 
casualties seem to increase from year to year, 
which is attributable to the fact that more 
men are engaged in deep mining than formerly. 
A noticeable feature has been also that very few 
mills or reduction works have been destroyed 
by tire. This class of property is considered 
by insurance companies to be as risky as any 
with which they have to do, and insurance' is 
no small item to the mill man. Of late years, 
however, where large, costly and permanent 
mills are ereoted, reservoirs are dug, pipes laid, 
hydrants put up and every possible precaution 
is taken to prevent the destruction of the pro- 
perty by fire. 

Another fact indicating the faith of capitalists 
in mining investments and proving that as a 
business, mining is gaining strength among us, 
is that the mills now made are larger than 
ever, the hoisting and pumping gear heavier 
and stronger, and the buildings and surface 
works are built in a manner indicating that the 
owners intend to work properly. The develop- 
ments in some of the deep mines on the coast 
have induced mining men to go deeper with a 
surer hope of success. We no longer scratch.- 
over the surface and consider a mine worked 
out with a 200 ft shaft. In Nevada they have 
shafts over 2,000 feet deep and are putting up 
machinery to work 4,000 feet. It was at one 
time supposed, that by the regular increase of 
temperature with depth, mining beiow 2,000 
feet would be almost impossible and so expen- 
sive as to be impracticable. Practice has 
proved that this idea is fallacious and by vari- 
ous means the heat in the lower levels is de- 
creased and the miners made more comfort- 
able. 

We are unable to chronicle this year any 
very marked improvement in the processes or 
machinery in use, but are gratified to know 
that millmen and miners show more care in 
working ores than they used to and that they 
manifest great interest in anything calculated 
to reduce expenses. Machinery is a great deal 
heavier and more costly than ever. The 
fouudrymen of this city have reaped a harvest 
from the miners of late, and. nearly all the 
foundries here are kept buBy with this class of 
work. Where formerly a 20-stamp was con- 
sidered a large order, 40, 60 and 80-stamp 



mills are now ordered. The Consolidated Vir- 
ginia 80-stamp mill started up on the first of 
January and another mill of the same size will 
shortly go up alongside of it. Oh the Sumner 
mine in Kern county an 80-stamp mill is being 
erected to run by water power and many other 
large mills in different parts of the State have 
been erected during 1874. 

There is no way for us to make any calcula- 
tion of the number of men employed in mining 
on this coast; nor can we tell whether there 
were more in 1874 than in 1873. The sup- 
position if, however, that there was an increase 
this year, as so many new mines were opened. 

It gives us satisfaction to know that last year 
capital was much readier to invest in good 
mines than has been the case for some time. 
California mines have been to some extent neg- 
lected, however, as the capitalists were more 
interested in Nevada. English capital which 
flowed into Utah last year so abundantly has 
been turned to some extent toward this State 
and some considerable amounts invested in 
gravel mining property. Our miners complain, 
however, that good property which will pay 
three per cent, per month goes begging in this 
market unless in the shape of stock. The late 
stock excitements have interested many in 
mining matters, who may continue to look 
favorably on them as a means of investment. 

There have been no drawbacks to our mining 
prosperity save alone the high price of quick- 
silver, which is spoken of at length further on. 
Tailings mills and works have in (some in- 
stances shut down and the price of this metal 
has had an injurious effect. This matter of 
rich tailings is now receiving considerable at- 
tention and they are now in many cases care- 
fully saved. Nevertheless, large quantities of 
tailings run to waste in the rivers and canoDS. 
With cheap power and quicksilver consider- 
able money can be made in working them over. 

Before speaking in detail of this State and 
■its prospects it may bo well to give some 
general remarks on th6 

Bullion Product of 1874, 

Which is considerably higher than that of 1873. 
The figures given further on ought to open the 
eyes of the most thoughtless man to the im- 
portance of the mining interests of the Pacific 
Coast. If we could get at the exact number of 
men employed in each calling we are confident 
that the miners would make a better showing 
per capita than the farmers, in the respective 
States and Territories. The miners of this 
coast have this year produced according to the 
most reliable figures obtainable, over 74,000,000 
of dollars. And this has been done without 
any political machinery, without any class or- 
ganizations, without the passage of any "Re- 
solutions" on any subject and with very little 
stir about the matter at all. They have been 
hard at work at their legitimate business and 
have turned out the needful coin for the com- 
mercial purposes of the world in abundant 
measure. 

Mr. "Valentine, General Superintendent of 
Wells, Fargo & Co., publishes the following 
statement showing the amount of precious 
metals produced in States and Territories 'west 
of the Missouri River during 1874: 

The total bullion product of the Pacific 
States aud Territories for the year 1873 was 
$72,258,693. This year it was $74,401,055 
showing an increase of $2,142,362 over 1873. 
Jno. J. Valentine, General Superintendent of 
Wells, Fargc & Co.'s Express, who computes 
the most reliable statistics on this point writes 
as follows: 

We hand you herewith a copy of our annual 
statement of precious metals produced in the 
States and Territories west of the Missouri 
river, including British Columbia, during 1874, 
which shows an aggregate yield of $74,401,055, 
being an excess of $2,142,362 over 1873. Cali- 
fornia, Nevada, Utah, Colorado and British 
Columbia increased; Oregon, Washington, 
Idaho, Montana, Arizona and Mexico (west 
coast) decreased. The increase in Nevada and 
Colorado is merely nominal, but in California 
and Utah it is $3,100,000, three-fourths of 
which is to the credit of California. 



gest, for one year, in the history of the coast." 
The accuracy of the statement has been ques- 
tioned, and the yield of 1853 referred to as 
being greater. Dr. Linderman, Director of the 
U. S. Mint, whose information is probably as 
leliable as may be had, names $65,000,000 as 
the amount produced in 1853, and that amount 
was not exceeded until 1873, which is now ex- 
ceeded by 1874, and the recent developments 
on the Comstock lode justify the belief that the 
total product for 1875 will approximate $80,- 
000,000. 

We append to this a comparative table, show- 
ing the bullion yield for the past three years as 
follows: 

1872. 1873. 1874. 

California $19,049,098.24 $18,052,923 $20,300,531 

Nevada 25,548,401.09 35,254,507 25,452,233 

Oregon 1,905,034.92 1,376,389 609,070 

Washington 22fi.051.06 209,395 155,535 

Idaho 2,514,089.78 2,343,654 1,880,004 

MontanaJ 4,442,134.90 ' 3,889,800 3,439,498 

Utah 3,521,020.09 4,106,337 6,911,278 

Arizona 143,770.00 47.788 26,066 

Colorado 3,001,750.85 4,083,268 4,191,405 

Mexico (WCoast) 535,071.80 886,798 798,678 

British Ool'bia, 1,350,074 1,250,035 1.636,657 

$62,376,914 72,258,693 74,401,055 

This makes a total bullion product for three 
years, including the west coast of Mexico and 
British Columbia, which do not properly be. 
long in the table, of $208,896,762. This is a 
very good showing, and is one to be proud of. 

The receipts of treasure in this city for 1874 
is given as follows by Mr.' Valentine: 

1874 Silver Bullion. Gold Bullion. Coin. 

January $ -959,962 $583,195 $820,487 

February 1,699,461 530,424 714,944 

March 1,505.863 619,259 670,662 

April 1,863,418 801,330 729,246 

May 1,971,458 949,139 907.U77 

June 1,973,675 855,856 ■ 1,320,472 

July 1 ,464,179 91H.163 1 ,025,673 

August 1,495,898 918,082 934,118 

September 1,654,367 790,978 1,037.613 

October 1,627,368 767,147 1,222,115 

November 1,573,972 622,034 1,049,395 

December 1,118,917 543,138 1,202,276 

Total $18,905,448 $8,897,471 $11,633,979 

In 1873 12,177,698 10,052,123 9,515,385 

There has been less gold and more silver. 
The sourceB of the receipts last year are an- 
nexed : 

From northern and southern mines $34,621,380 

From northern coast route 2,206,212 

From southern coast route 601 ,457 

From Mexico 2,007,899 






\hh$*. 






I 



&3 « ~t-i "-3 V" ~ZO "01 Or 
CO -J W <31 W ™ " "• 
CO to Oa CTCD 



Gold Dust and Bullion 
by Express. 



Gold Dust and Bullion 

by 

other Conveyances. 



eg 






PJ. 




CT 


f 




Silver Bullion by 






.*: ?! 






V 






ExpresB. 


£ 




Oli-J 




« 






*» 




to 




°} • ■ 


























o 


: i 5" : 






by Freight. 












00 




OO _• 


..". ** 





In our statement for 1873 we referred to the 
yield— $72,258,693— as "undoubtedly the lar- 



Total $39,436,868 

In 1873 31,855,208 

In 1872 33,842,737 

We append a table showing the total gold and 
silver production of this coast since California i 
was first settled by the Americans. The figures i 
are such as to astonish those who have no ideat 
of the amount of mining done bore. About 20 i 
per cent, is added to Wells, Fargo & Co. 'si 
figures to cover bullion conveyed by other i 
means. 

Total Gold and Silver Production. 

Year. Gold Silver. Total. 

1818 $5,000,000 $6,000,0001 

1849 23,000,000 23,000,0001 

1850 59,000.000 59,000,0001 

1851 60.000,000 60,000,000' 

1852 59,000,000 69,000,000i 

1853 68.000,000 68,000,000' 

1854 64,000,000 61,000,0001 

1855 58,000,000 58,000,000' 

1856 63,000,000 63.000,000- 

1857 64,000,000 61,000,000' 

1858 69,000,000 56.000,000' 

1859 59,000.000 59,000,000' 

1860 52,000,000 $90,897 52,090,897 

ISfil 50, Ul 10, "I 111 2.275,256 52,275,256 

1862 52,000,000 6,247,014.: 58,247,02* 

1863 57,000,000 12,486,238 70,486,23* 

1864 55,967,605 16.797.5&5 72,765,1901 

1865 67,496.800 10,184,877 73,681,677 

1866 61,000,000 18,000,000 78,000,000' 

1867 63,000,000 22,000,000 75,000,000' 

1868 51,000,000 16,000.000 67,000,000 

1869 47,000,000 16,000,000 63,000,000 

1870 48,000.000 28,000,000 66,000,000 

1871 42,357,000 24,246,000 66,603,000 

1872 42.688,103 ..27,648,811 70.236.9U' 

1873 35,400,000 44,600.000 80,000,000 

1874 43,400.000 56,600,000 100,000.000 



Total $1,382,309,608 $294,076,678 $1,681, 386.18P 

The production by StateB and Territories ia shown in 
the following table: 

Year. California. Nevada Montana. Idaho. 

1848 $ 5,000,000 

1849 22,000,000 

18,50 59,000.000 

1851 60,000.000 

1852 59.000.000 

1853 68.000.000 

1S54 64,000,000 

1855 58.1100.00(1 

1856 68*000,000 

1S5T. 61,000,0011 

1858 59.000,000 

1859 59,000,000 

I860 52,000,000 90,887 

1861 50,000,0011 2,247,256 

1862 51,500,000 6.247.024 500,000 

1863 50,000.000 12.486,218 8.000.01)0 

1864 35,000.000 16,797.585 13 000,000 6.474,08? 

1865 35,020.000 16,848,8:9 13,835,998 ti.58I.44t 

1866........ 26.0011. le.m'iuiiiil 48,'.00.00'l 7,000,001' 

1867 25000,0'0 20.00n,UIIO 12."00,000 6,500.001 

1868 22,000,i'00 14 000.000 15,000,000 7,000,011 

1869 21000,000 14,000 000 12,000,000 7.000,00 

1870 25,800.000 16,000.110(1 9 100.1100 6.000,0ft 

1871 25,850.000 16,000.000 9,100,000 6,000,00 

1872........ 21,450,000 22.500.000 8,000,000 5,000,00 

1B73 20,000.000 36,000,"0ft 4000.000 2,400,00 

1874 26,000.060 45.000,000 4,000.000 2,500,00 

Total.. $1,143,620,060 $254,245,869 $126,535,998 $62,455,52 1 



Year. 


Or. & Wash. 


Utah. 










1,396,360 










3,000,000 










3,000,000 

3,000,000 




1870... 


1,300,000 


1871.... 


2,500,000 


2,800,000 


1872.... 


2,131.086 


6,125,152 


1873... 


1,600,000 


9,000.000 




1,500,000 


10.000,000 









8,000.00 
8,500,00 
5,000,00 
6,000,00 
4,800.00 
4,853,00 
5,030,67 
7,000,00 I 
11,000,00 



Total $26,619,906 $31,725,152 $60,183,67! 

Some idea of the amount of money handle' 
here may be had from a brief review of th t 
operations of the mint in this city durin 
1874. The amount coined at the San FrancisC' 
branch mint in 1874 was $27,329,000, agains 



January 23, 1875.] 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



57 



$22,075,400 in 1873, an increase of $5,245,- 
500. Of the coinage last year, $24,460,000 
wan in gold, and $2,867,000 was in silver. 
During the same time tbe mint atCarson coined 
$2,620,775 in gold, and $1,411,781 in silver, 
making a total lor both mints of $31,418,265. 

The operations of the San Francisco assay- 
ing and refining works were as follows for 
1874: 

Gold . 

Mouths. Ounces. Value. 

DUkry 66,754.65 $1,368,442.97 



February M .911.50 

March 86.493. i4 

April 85.161.68 

May 'J5.«6,40 

June 136,9 

July 127,369.29 

August 190,838.19 

September 119,961.09 

October 106.886.38 

November 94,130 47 

December 93,480.06 



1,761,610.70 
1,979.861.90 
1,745.840.03 
526.038.10 
2,6yti,7!HU*>.S 
2,008,863.95 
2,681,267,48 
2,444,153.55 
2,170,051.15 
1,816^88.38 
1,915.359.60 



Total* 1,157,726.28 $22,724,108.52 

It is but jnst to say in connection with tho 
table of bullion product given above, that 
figures they are compiled with care by Mr. Val- 
entine, and are approximately correct. Never- 
theless, they should be much larger from the 
nature of things. These figures represent the 
bullion, gold-dust, etc, whioh passes through 
the bands of Wells, Fargo & Co. as common 
carriers. Fully 20 per cent, should be added, 
however, for the sum which passes from the 
mines by private hands, and other modes of 
conveyance than Wells, Fargo, & Co. This 
being the case, if we deduct Mexico and 
British Oolumbia from the aggregate, it will 
still be muoh larger than is shown in the above 
table. 

Tho next important question is that of 
Mining Dividends, 
As it has an intimate connection, of course, 
with the bullion product. We give a compara- 
tive table showing the dividends from mining 
companies called on the Stock Boards in this 
city: 

1872. 

Belcher $2,184,000 

Black Bear 

Crown Point 1,860,000 

Conn. Virglola 

Cone. Amador 

Cederberg 36.000 

Chollar 56,000 

Chariot Mill 

Eureka 40,000 

Eureka Cons 

Golden Chariot 

Keystone Quartz 30,000 

K. ,K. Cons 

La Grange 

Meadow Valley.... 
Monitor Belmont. 

Minnesota 

Mahogany 

North Star 

Pioche 

Providence 

Baymond & Ely.., 
Bedington Quick. 
Yule Gravel 



1873. 1874 

$6,762,000 $5,304,000 



45,000 
5,100,000 



50,000 
24,000 



69,000 
3,400,000 
2,592,000 



360,000 



15,000 
27,000 
40,000 
3,100 
2,070,000 



300,000 
200,000 
85,000 

' 62, KM 
12,500 
180,000 
75,000 
60,000 



10,000 



264,000 



$6,730,100 $13,366,000 $11,805,000 

In summing up the above only those mines 
are taken into account which advertise their 
dividends in this city. All the above mentioned 
are on the lists of the Stock Boards, except 
the Redington Quicksilver, Minnesota and the 
Black Bear. A falling off is shown in the div- 
idends this year, which is principally due to the 
decrease of the dividends of the Belcher and 
Crown Point. It will be noticed by even the 
casual observer that not one gravel mine is 
represented in the figures of dividends for this 
year. This fact alone goes to show bow unsat- 
isfactory it is to base any calculation on the 
dividend list published. Of the hundreds of 
private corporations mining profitably, not one 
is mentioned. Some of these mines, like the 
Idaho at Grass Valley, are what is known as 
* 'close corporations, "the stock being held in few 
hands and the mines worked as mines and not 
as a stock jobbing operations. 

We can mention the following prominent 
California mines, only one of which is on the 
Stock Board which have yielded $2,996,503 
from 187,391 tons of ore,this year, making nearly 
$300,000 each on the average, yet no mention 
is made of them in the dividend lists published. 
They are as follows: Idaho, Eureka, Black 
Bear Plumas-Eureka, Sierra Buttes, Sumner, 
Hue's mine, Keystone, Empire. We shall 
speak more in detail of these mines further on. 
The following table gives an account of all the 
dividends disbursed by the different mines 
called in the Stock Board from its organization, 
up to January 1, 1875: 

Belcher $14,135,000 

Crown Point...., 11,388,000 

Cons. Virginia 2,592,000 

Chollar 3,080,000 

Confidence 78,000 

Charriot Mill 51,000 

Cederbuxg 100,000 

ConB. Amador 210,000 

Daney 56,000 

Eureka .' 2,094,000 

Empire Mill 713,500 

Eoreka Cone 675,000 

Gonld & Carry 3,826,800 

Golden Charriot.... 500,000 

Hale h NorcrostJ 1,598,000 

Imperial 1,067,500 

Ida Elimore 60,000 

^ Keystone Quartz 30,000 

Kentuck i 1,252,000 

K. K. Cons 62,500 

Meadow Valley 1,200,000 

Mahogany 15,000 

Monitor Belmont 75,000 

Opblr 1,394,400 

O. H. Treasure 31,999 

Pioche 60,000 

Baymond & Ely 3,075,000 

Bye Patch 22,600 

Sierra Nevada 102,500 

Succor 22.800 



lOO.OOU 
11.000 



14.I35.0UU 



78,000 
8,592,000 

11,388,11)0 



1,-688,000 
1,067,500 



Assessments and Dividends. 
The following table shows the total assess- 
ments and dividends on mines called on the 
San Francisco Stock Board : 

Tot'lam't Tot'lmii.t Div- 
Companies. Aw,t Levied, id'da Disb'd 

CALUAiliNIA MTifEri. 

Alpine $ 78,000 $ 

Oob. Amador 210.0W) 

Kollevmt 101,000 

Codorberft 12.000 

Oh*not Mill 15,000 

Kareka 

Independent 83,000 

Key »ione Quartz 

Magtmta 10,000 

St- Patrick 1*0.000 

Tecunueh 72,000 

YuleGravel 9.W0 

WASHOK- 

Alaino 7,500 

Alpha Con.... 150.000 

Alia 3.60O 

American Flat 75,000 

Acdos 75,000 

Baltimore Con 351,000 

Bent J; Belcher 136.IM 

B«lcher 660,400 

Bullion 1,802.000 

Buckeye 188,000 

Caledo nia 500.000 

Chollar-PoWai 742,000 

Confidence 2«,ai0 

Oon. Virginia 411.200 

CrownPoint 623,371 

Crown Pointltavine 15,000 

Daney..... 198,000 

Dayton lOO.l'HW 

Dardanelles 60.000 

Eclipsu Winters Plato 12.500 

KmpiroMill .,.:. 416,400 

Europa 10,000 

Kiohetjuer 180.000 

Gloho Oon t 114,000 

Gould ± Curry 1,532.000 

Greea 10,000 

Hale & Norcross 1,450,000 

Imperial 1,270.000 

Indus ;....;. 13,500 

Insurance 10,500 

Julia 428,700 

Justice 431,500 

Kentuck 270.000 

Knickerbocker 278.000 

Kossuth 54,000 

Lady Bryan Wo.OOO 

Lady Washington 36,000 

Leo 27,21)0 

Mint 40,000 

New York 207,000 

Occidental 42,500 

OeGold Hill 30,00*1 

Ophir 1,832,800 

Overman 1,531,0811 

Phil Sheridan 12,000 

Pictou 38,200 

Bock Island 108,000 

Savage 1,744.000 

Seg. Belcher 212,<MH> 

Senator 75,600 

Sag. Caledonia 1,000 

South Oomstook 20,000 

South Overman 15,000 

Sntro 12,000 

Silver Cloud 8,000 

Silver Hill 432,000 

Sierra Nevada ". 800,000 

Sucoor M. and M v 273,900 

Trench 5,000 

Tyler 62,700 

Union Consolid 60,000 

Utah,... 100.000 

Weils Fargo 3,600 

Woodville 249,000 

Yellow Jacket 2,118,000 

WHITE PINE. 

General Lee 15.000 

Hayes 58.000 

Mammoth 95,400 

Or. Hidden Treas , 330,061 

Silver Wave '. 160,900 

IDAHO. 

Empire 250,000 

Golden Ohariot 555,000 

Ida Elimore 575,000 

Mahogany 348,800 

Poorman 25,000 

Silver Cord 102,000 

South Chariot 225.0(H) ■ 

Virtue , 120,000 

War Eagle 100,000 

RedJaoket 90,000 

COPE DISTBICT. 

Eicelaior 24,000 

ELI DISTBICT. 

Amador Tunnel 60,000 

American Flag 1M.00O ' 

Alps 97,500 

Bowery 94,500 

Charter Oak 30,000 

Chapman 37,500 

Cherry Creek 4,500 

Chief of the Hill 67,500 

Condor 37,500 

Huhn & Hunt 279.000 

Ingomar 70,000 

Ivanhoe 15,000 

Kentucky 127,500 

Kmscon 15,000 

Lillian H«ll 11,250 

Meadow Valley 210,000 

National 135,000 

Newark 256,600 

Page A Panaca 190,000 

Peavine 37,500 

Pioche 180,000 

Pioche Phem'x 100,000 

Pioche West Ex 66,500 

Portland 71,000 

Raymond A Ely 180,000 

RyePatch 67,500 

Silver P-ak 90,000 

Silver Weat Con - 37,500 

Standard 60,000 

Spring Mount 43 750 

Spring Mountain Tun 33,000 

Wash. & Creole 262,500 

Watson 30,000 

UTAH. 

Wellington 59,000 

EUBEKA DISTBICT. 

Adams Hill 50.000 

Columbus 87,500 

Eureka Oon I 

Jackson 52,500 

K.K.Oon 

Phenii 337,500 

Star Consolidated '. 30,000 

PHILADELPHIA. 

Belmont 225,000 

El Dorado North 12,500 

El Dorado South Con 200,000 

Josephine 3,750 

North Belmont 10,000 

Suintero 15,000 

onitor Belmont 75,000 



1,200,000 



3,075,000 
22,500 



,, ■ ---■;■•• 4,460,000 

Yellow Jacket 2.184 000 

YuleGravel £40,000 

Total..... $56,261,499 



Totals. , 31,048,830 56,261,499 

It is only worth while to mention a few of 
the mines which have paid and are not included 
in this list. The Idaho, at Grass Valley, paid 
in dividends the last fiscal year the sum of 
5317,750. Since this mine began running, in 
1869, it has paid 517 per cent on the capital 
stock, or a sum total of $1,602,700 in dividends. 
It paid $102.50 per share last year. The 
Bald Mountain, from July 1, 1872, to July 1, 
1874, paid $164,000 in dividends. The Spring 
Valley mine, Butte county, turned out in the 
year ending last July, $476,112, of which the 
owners received $150,000. The Black Diamond 
coal company paid this year $275,000 in divi- 
dends, and the Eastport Coos Bay Ooal mining 
company paid $12,500. Many of the quick- 
silver mines are paying well, and almost all the 



hydraulic mines which are in operation are 
paying. None of these, however, are called in 
the Board, and their names do not therefore 
appear. Many other quartz mines are in the 
Kuiiu' category. But even taking those called 
in the Board, in the list given above, by com- 
paring the total assessments and the total divi- 
dends, we see a profit to the stockholders of 
the large sum of $25,212,569, showing an im- 
mense gain on tbe capital invested. Wo have 
said enough on this subject to inform the 
reader that while the richest mines are rep- 
resented in the tables given, it is not practic- 
able to gather the same information from close 
corporations. 

Ditches and Gravel Mines. 
It is impossible, within the limits of a news- 
paper article, to give more than a brief review 
of the operations in the different States. We 
shall therefore confine onrselveB entirely to 
California; and even then can only mention in 
general terms the results of the year. The 
statistics of bullion production give us an in- 
crease over the year 1873 of $2,247,709. This 
in mainly due to the faot that last year was a 
much better one, from a miner's point of view 
than the previous. The water supply was 
large, and consequently more washing could be 
done. Many new hydraulic mines have been 
opened this year, and many more are shortly 
to be opened. Several important mining 
ditches were dag in 1874, which will open new 
tracts of country, and furnish a more abundant 
supply for old mines. Prominent among these 
was the Amador Canal, as it is called. This 
will be of inestimable advantage to Amador 
county, and already many new mines are being 
opened that will last for years to come. Heavy 
gravel mining will in future be a feature in the 
county, and will add largely to the wealth of 
the community. The canal wilt not only fur- 
nish water for the gravel mines, but will fur- 
nish power to the quartz mines. It has a 
capacity of 5,000 miner's inches of water, and 
the water can be so utilized as to make a sin- 
gle head serve many purposes. When used 
for mills, it can be used for placer mining, and 
thence to the plains for irrigation. An im- 
mense reservoir is being built for this canal at 
New York Kanch, which shall cover 140 acres 
of ground and hold 800,000,000 gallons of 
water. The bed of this reservoir is of granite 
formation. The canal is 45 miles loDg, and is 
built with great strength and care. 

The big ditch of the North Fork company, 
built particularly to work the mines near the 
North Fork of the Feather river, about six 
miles south of Big Meadows, in Plumas county, 
was finished last month. This was also a diffi- 
cult undertaking. This ditch is 25% miles 
long, and there are eight miles of pipe in addi- 
tion to reach the company's property. Con 
siderable tunnel work was done in building 
this ditch, whioh is -six feet wide on top and 
three feet deep. It furnishes water for a large 
extent of country, and the result of the under- 
taking will be shown in the bullion product 
next year. 

The El Dorado Water and Deep Gravel min- 
ing company's canal is also an undertaking 
worthy of mention. They have had sometimes 
as high as 1,200 men at work in this ditch 
during the season. The capacity of the canal 
is 12,000 inches for 24 hours, and as the com- 
pany can only use 3,000 inches they can sell 
to miners on the route some 7,000 inches, 
allowing for evaporation and leakage. The 
canal is big enough to float lumber nearly to 
Placerville. Some 5,000 inches will run 
through this season, but the whole work will 
not be done until the next season. It will fur- 
nish water for many mines in the gulches and 
flats which have been short before thiB. 

The Maxwell ditch, in Plumas county, which 
was commenced in 1872, will probably be ex- 
tended down the river as fast as necessary to 
work the numberless bars and gravel beds un- 
der the ditch line. The ditch carries 2,000 
inches of water, with one of the best water priv- 
ileges in the county. 

At Cherokee Flat, Butte county, some of the 
largest hydraulic operations in the State are 
going on. The Spring Valley company, at 
that place, have expended in works, flumes, 
ditches,- reservoirs and water privileges, over 
one million dollars. They have four miles of 
pipe on the line of their ditch, and ten miles 
of sluices, varying from four to six feet in 
depth; they have also twenty-three under- 
currents. They employ about 160 men, and 
for the year ending July, 1874, shipped $476,- 
112. The two ditches owned by the company 
are 60 miles in length, six feet wide on the bot- 
tom and eight feet wide on top. They are four 
feet deep and run a stream of 2, 200 inches of 
water. This mine proposes to send a bar of 
gold worth $100,000 to the Centennial Exposi- 
tion. 

Another big ditch run this year was that of 
the Milton Water and Ditch Co., in Nevada 
county. This company purchased this year 
extensive water rights and storage reservoirs in 
the middle Yuba river. Their ditch holds 
2,500 inches of water. The North Bloomfield 
Gravel Co., at the same place, last year con- 
structed extensive works for the improvement 
of their property. They completed their large 
tunnel last month. It has taken about two 
and one-half years time and the expense has 
been enormous. It will pay for itself soon, 
however. This tunnel is nine thousand feet 
long. These mines are on the San Juan 
range, in which are located several important 
gravel districts, such as French Corral, Em- 
pire Flat, Eate Hayes Flat, Birch ville, Buckeye 
Hill, Sweetland, Manzanita Hill. San Juan, 
Badger Hill, Cherokee. Chimney Hill, Colum- 
bia Hill, Kennebec Hill, Grizzly Hill, Lake 



City, Malakoff, Humbug, Relief Hill, Wolsey. 
Moore's Flat and Snow Point, all old camps 
on the gravel channel. 

Around Dutch Flat and Gold Run extensive 
hydraulic operations are going on. The Gold 
Run Ditch and Mining Co. bring water from 
Bear aud South Yuba rivers, through 28 miles 
of ditches, and use some 2,000 inches of water 
on their claims. They are running a 3,000-ft. 
tunnel to get the necessary fall to work certain 
claims, a 1,000-ft. branch tunnel from it is 
finished. The Cedar Creek, an English com- 
pany, who bought tho Placer county ditch, 
now own 60 miles of ditch. The main ditch 
gives them 6,000 inches of water. This com- 
pany now owns 32 claims, or 200 aores of min- 
ing ground, and sells about 1,500 inches of 
water to outside parties. Thev are running an 
8x8 tunnel 3.0U0 feet long. The South Yuba 
Canal Co., at this place, is also selling to min- 
ers about 3,000 inches, which is brought 
through 28 miles of ditch from the South 
Yuba. In this vicinity everything is flourish- 
ing. The Indiana Hill Co. are running a tun- 
nel 2,200 feet long, and they will begin wash- 
ing in February. 

Calaveras county now rivals the more north- 
ern counties in hydraulic mining. New loca- 
tions are constantly being made, and various 
tunnel and hydraulic operations are vigorously 
prosecuted. The mines are of a permanent 
character, and the result of the present season's 
work will be a good one. Some of the mines 
now worked were a few years since considered 
as exhausted diggings. 

The improvements recently made in hy- 
draulic mining and the reduced price of water 
in many places consequent on competition, 
have increased the value of mining property in 
many places. Though hydraulic mining has 
been carried on for nearly twenty years, at 
many points it was only recently that Hteps 
were taken to develop the deep gravel deposits, 
all the work having been done at easily acces- 
sible points. Tbe value of a hydraulic mine 
depends greatly on the facilities for working 
it, and each year new mines are opened up by 
ditches and flumes. 

Drift Mining. 

Drift mining has of late years become quite 
profitable in California. The term drifting, as 
applied to this class of operations, relates to 
the mode of extracting the auriferous gravel 
by means of tunnels and gangways, or galleries, 
and washing the dirt in sluices. This system 
is rendered necessary on account of the cap- 
ping of volcanic matter overlying the ancient 
channels and rendering hydraulic operations 
impossible. In hydraulic mining the entire 
face of the bank is removed by the pipe; in 
drifting claims only the lower stratum of gravel 
lying on the bedrock is mined and washed. 
The average depth of pay gravel, when mined 
in this manner is three feet. Careful estimates 
place the yield of gravel generally at $1 per 
car-load of 16 cubic feet to be considered pro- 
fitable for drift mining, and the minimum 
yield is fixed at from 85 cents to $1 per cubio 
yard of broken ground — not ground in place. 
The old Live Yankee claim in Sierra county 
now nearly worked out, yielded during active 
operations (from 1855 to 1863, inclusive), the 
sum of $698,534, of which $370,100 wa« used 
for opening up the claim, and the dividends 
disbursed were $328,368. For several years 
after, and until the ultimate exhaustion of the 
ground, the dividends averaged $10,000 per an- 
num. The claim yielded from date of opening 
$1,000,000, of which half was paid in dividends. 
The Bald Mountain claim now being worked in 
Sierra county, may be taken as a specimen of 
this class of claims. We gave a detailed de- 
cryption of this claim a short time since, so it 
is only necessary to refer to it here incident- 
ally, with respect to the profit of this class of 
claims. This company paid out $200,000 in 
dividends between April, 1872, and January 
1st, 1873, the only outlay being $20,000 for 
running their tunnel 1,800 feet long. The to- 
tal yield from July 1st, 1872. to July 1st, 1874, 
was $328,352, of which $164,000 was paid out 
in dividends. The ground has paid them $2.76 
per car-load, or over $1.09 per cubic yard. The 
percentage of dividends to gross amount is 50 
per cent. Up to last October they had taken 
out $345,079 from a piece of ground 1,000 feet 
long by 500 wide, exclusive of the unworked 
ground within the area, and not including the 
gravel piles in the company's yards. These 
figures and those given below give an idea of 
the relative profit of this kind of mining, 
which is very little understood outside the 
mining districts even in California. 

The Indiana Hill Blue Gravel Co., or Ce- 
ment Mill Co., as it is sometimes called, at 
Gold Run, is also a drift claim. They crush the 
gravel with an 8-stamp mill. They work a. 
breast seven feet high and 100 feet wide. The 
mill crushes 45 car-loads in 24 hours, each car- 
load weighing 1,600 pounds. The company has 
been running a long time. We give from a re- 
liable source the result of the last three years' 
work. In 1874, with nine months run, they 
crushed 10,017 car-loads, which yielded $30,- 
811.50, an average of a little 'over $3 per car- 
load. In 1873, with seven months run, 6,600 
car-loads yielded $24,000, or an average of 
nearly $4. In 1872, with four and a half 
months run, thev crushed 3,300 car-loads, 
which yielded $19,410, an average of a little 
over $5 per car-load. 

The placer mines near Oroville, in the "Lava 
Beds," have been purchased this year by Chi- 
namen, who have been working them with 
profit. Upwards of 4,000 Chinamen are at 

(.Continued on Pag-e 60.) 



58 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



[January 23, 1875 



A Chapter of Tu!e History -.Staten 
Island. 

[Prom Paciflo Rural Press. 
Editors Pbebs:— The season of 1873-4 is 
completed and its lessons of success or failure 
are ready for our instruction. There are many 
-tasks and many learners in this school, and 
each learner has his own task. The present 
theme is a chapter from the experience of the 
tule lands of our State. The swamp lands 
generally, of California, have been growing in 
favor within the past few years, and all infor- 
mation on the subject excites attention. Un- 
fortunately for the very object aimed at in re- 
recent publications exceptional facts and 
circumstances are insisted upon too much as if 
of common occurrence. It must be noticed, as 
prefatory to every remark, that experiment has 
not yet given sufficient data from which to de- 
duce a certain rule. Our chief concern still is 
to gather and compare data, and such is the 
purpose of the writer of this article. The re- 
marks are also intended to be confined to one 
district of swamp land and will detail briefly 
the history of that district. 

Staten Island. 
The tract in question is formed by the forks 
of the Mokelumne river just before that river 
unites with the San Joaquin, and is also within 
eaBy reach of Sacramento river, either across a 
narrow neck of land, or farther by means of the 
many streams that link this well-watered re- 
gion. It lies in Sacramento county and from 
Walnut Grove Post-office, which is one mile 
from the head of the island, a good road ex- 
tends 30 miles through a thickly-settled and 
fruit-bearing country to Sacramento city. 
Like all other fresh water tide lands, Staten 
island, in its natural condition, was a swamp 
over which the higher tides flowed, keeping it 
continually wet. As would be expected, the 
banks of theBe lands are usually somewhat 
higher than the interior, and the water flowing 
in at a spring tide is kept within, as in a basin, 
so that there are usually several inches of water 
always on the land back from the shore. In 
very dry seasons, however, the lowness of the 
river lessens the frequency of the tidal over- 
flow, and this, with the large evaporation, 
renders the land dry enough for pasturing 
stock. At such times iu the past, large herds 
of cattle and bands of sheep have been pas- 
tured on the tule lands, without any reclama- 
tion or leveeing whatever, and considerable 
quantities of the wild grasB have been ( cut and. 
baled under like circumstances. This grass has 
a bayonet-Bhaped blade and grows from a 
strong root and stock, branching out a few 
inches from the ground. It prefers a soil com- 
posed almost entirely of vegetation, in which 
it thrives luxuriantly, attaining a bight of four 
or five feet. Wherever the quantity of sedi- 
ment increases in the soil, the tule, a tall, 
round rush, often ten feet high, becomes more 
common. It is this plant, said to be so termed 
by the Indians, that gives name to the lands 
under consideration. The first settlement on 
the tule lands were made along the Sacramento 
river and for a long time were confined to the 
high ridge of bank land formed by the sediment 
which had accumulated from the winter floods. 
This bank land has been and still is very valu- 
able as orchard and garden land. The settlers 
in time discovered that the back land was good 
for pasture and also that the soil was chiefly of 
vegetable ^formation— in many cases a fair 
quality of peat— and that when dried it would 
burn in the ground. They also found that any 
crops planted in the ashes of the burnt land 
would grow and yield remarkably well. In 
this way, the value of the tule lands was demon- 
strated upon a small scale, and capitalists, thus 
assured, have undertaken the problem upon a 
large scale, and one phase of that problem 
is here presented iu this account of Staten 
island. 

The Work of Reclamation 

Was begun in June, 1872. Eight dams were 
put in as many sloughs, without the aid of 
piling, except in the instance of the largest 
slough, which also was the first dam built. 
Had it been left to the last it could likely have 
been completed- without piling. The great 
difficulty in the v/ay of building dams, and 
levees, too, on the tule lands is the lightness of 
the earth. lb many cases the sods cut from 
the ground float. Such material -should be 
avoided entirely and heavier sought. This can 
always be found in the vicinity of the sloughs, 
and, with the judicious use of light brush, a 
substantial bond can be made. 

The largest portion of the leveeiDg was done 
by a steam dredge iu charge of W. C. Sullivan. 
This machine digs a ditch twelve feet wide and 
four and one half feet deep, somewhat after the 
Osgood plan, except that the bucket is attached 
to a movable frame on a turn-table, which turns 
to the right or left to dump the earth. The 
whole apparatus is operated on a scow which 
floats in the ditch it digs, and is drawn up to 
its work by means of a capstan and anchor 
ahead. It was claimed for the machine that 
tn.t large mass of a full bucket, about one cubic 
yard, dropped Bix or eight feet while soft, would 
make a more compact levee than the small sods 
cut out, handled and laid in the levee by Chi- 
namen. The experience of the past winter 
seems to confirm this claim. The machine 



levee was indeed broken in a number of places; 
but the embrasures were small, and in no case 
was the earth carried away. The expense of 
excavation is also leas than by Chinamen; but 
unfortunately the machine cannot change the 
depth and width of its ditch, nor vary its cast 
of the earth, and hence, being confined to a 
uniform ditch, the field of its operations is very 
limited. It is a matter of great regret that 
steam dredging apparatus has not been em- 
ployed to a greater extent. Both on Staten 
island and on other tracts of tule land large 
mud flats have been formed by sedimentary 
deposits brought down by the winter rains, 
and this material can be put into levees at a 
reasonable cost by steam dredges. But be the 
cost of it double or treble that of the peaty soil 
of which Chinamen build levees, still it would 
be cheaper than the peat. It has required the 
loss of several large crops and the overflow of 
valuable lands to teach the reclaimers of tule 
lauds the absurdity of erecting barriers against 
water of material that might float. 

The first step toward proper reclamation was 
in the use of the earth taken from the river 
bank on the outside of the levee. There the 
sediment already spoken of had accumulated 
to the depth of 18 inches, though considerably 
mingled with the roots of vegetation, and the 
sediment and roots combined make a very sub- 
stantial levee, This method was first tried on 
Staten island, in the spring of the year just 
passed, in the face of many prophesies of evil 
results, founded mainly on the bad effects of 
cutting ditches on the outside of the levee on 
Sherman island. On that island breaks in the 
levee and serious cracks in the soil under it 
have occurred, but the experiment on Staten 
island has been eminenly satisfactory, and the 
example there set is being followed on other 
similar tracts. The earth taken from the out- 
side of the levee is a yellow loamy clay, and 
the embankment built of it was found, after six 
months' u^age, to have shrunk and settled very 
little compared with the previous levee of peat, 
and a large percentage of what loss did occur 
was, doubtless, owing to the foundation upon 
whioh the addition was built. Nor was there 
any break in the levee after the exterior soil 
was added, although the levee was subjected to 
the tides of June, the largest of the year. After 
this satisfactory showing it remains now but to 
take one step further, and with a steam dredge 
get a material entirely fiee from vegetable mat- 
ter, and furnished in un.imited quantities on 
the margin of the land to be reclaimed, and 
with it erect on an unbroken sod, effectual walls 
against the inroads of floods. 

Cultivation. 

The problem of the tule lands now turn 3 
wholly upon their reclamation, and involves 
mainly the substance of which the levees are 
built. There is no longer any question regard- 
ing their productiveness. All who know these 
lands are satisfied in this respect. Even those 
who have been disheartened by the loss of their 
crops bring no charge against the soil, but 
commend it saying: " The land is good enough 
if you only keep the water off." The soil is 
composed mainly of roots and decayed tules, 
grass and other plants, and consequently is 
generally nothing but a peat bed, varying in 
depth from 5 to 30 feet. The surface kept dry 
in the summer will burn in the fall to the depth 
of several inches, and in the ashes of the sod 
the crops are planted. In the fall of 1873 
Staten island was fired, but owing to the short 
time the levee had been completed the burning 
was not extensive. Planting was begun by the 
three or four settlers in January, 1874. Wheat 
was first sown until about the 1st of March; 
after that common and chevalier barley were 
sown until the 15th of May. Most of the crops 
were put in with sheep, which were driven 
compactly over the burnt land after the seed 
had been sown. The remainder were harrowed 
in. The planting of the crop was found to be 
comparatively light work whether with sheep or 
harrows and at a cost of from $2 to $4 per acre, 
including the seed. The chief trouble was 
from the miring of the horses. Various appli- 
ances in the way of horseshoes were resorted 
to, the best of which was an iron shoe with an 
exterior ring attached to it so as to receive the 
horse's weight. With such a "tule shoe " 
teams could get over the ground with consider- 
able ease. 

Harvest. 

Seed-time being past, harvest began to be 
looked for. The grain sprouted and looked 
well; The heads appeared and nodded in the 
wind and gladdened the eye of the farmer. 
Then, when the fields were whitening for the 
harvest, a serious evil threatened in the shape 
of rtd rust. The wheat and barley were both 
affected; bnt it was noticed that the late sown 
grain suffered most. Wheat sown previous 
to the first of February escaped almost entirely 
without injury, and the later sown resisted the 
rust much better than was expected when it 
first appeared. It was thought also that the 
continued wet weather and late high water had 
as much to do in causing the rust as the late 
sowing. Early sowing, however, seems to be 
successful in any condition of weather, and a 
remedy in case of a very wet season. When 
harvest came, crops of undoubtedly large yield 
stood ready to be gathered. Good judges esti- 
mated the yield from 40 to 80 bushels ptr'acre. 
Actual experiment found samples that pro- 
duced, one, 77% bushels per acre; another, 
58% buBhels per acre, both of wheat. Elated 
by these large figures, the farmers, inexperi- 
enced on tule soil, declined contracts which 
they thought too high, and undertook the 
work of harvesting themselves. On account of 
the softness of the ground it was thought that 



headers would be too heavy, and reapers were 
employed instead to cut the grain. In most 
cases the grain lay on the ground for several 
weeks after it was cut, and was . at length load- 
ed, loose, into wagons by Chinamen and hauled, 
either to the stack or to the threshing-machine. 
The tires of the wagons were two and one half 
inches wide, and the ease with which they, and 
alRo the reapers got over the soil was quite con- 
clusive that headers might have been used, and 
thus saved the large expense of so much hand- 
ling of the grain in the .field. A large portion 
of the crops was not harvested till long after 
they were ripe, and, in consequence, the grain 
fell down so that the- reapers could not cut 
cleanly, but left on the ground as much as one- 
fourth to one-half of the crop. Headers with 
their lifters would have prevented this serious 
loss. 

The Yield. 
Notwithstanding the defective harvesting, 
the yield was very good.- The land was culti- 
vated in scattered tracts, and no exact measure- 
ments could be readily made; but, estimated by 
the quantity of seed sown, there were about 
1,000 acreB — 450 in wheat and 550 in barley, 
The figures taken from the threshers' accounts 
show, in the aggregate, a yield of 5,800 sacks 
of wheat and .8, 400 sacks of barley. The aver- 
age yield per acre' was, consequently, thirteen 
sacks of wheat and fifteen sacks of barley, or, 
by measurement, twenty-nine bushels of wheat 
and thirty-four bushels of barley. While 
these figures show a good yield, they do not 
show the entire production of the crops. In 
addition to what was left on the ground, one 
large stack of wheat was burned up and a very 
considerable quantity of barley was destroyed 
by the early rain which overtook the late 
threshing. It is very safe, therefore, to say, 
that one-fourth of the crop was lost, and the 
true average yield would be represented by 
thirty-nine bushels of wheat and forty-five 
bushels of barley per acre. A crop of wheat 
cut for hay yielded about three tons per acre. 
A number of acres of Indian corn were planted, 
but not being cultivated after the planting 
nothing came of it but promises of an abun- 
dant yield in case of a proper cnltivation. 
The Coming Season. 
Such is the issue of the first year's crop on 
Staten Island. While it did not fulfill the san- 
guine expectations of the farmers, still the re- 
sult is quite satisfactory. The defects and 
losses were due mainly to inexperience on new 
ground, and were no more thau what should 
have been expected in an untried field* In- 
deed it is a matter of surprise that the outcome 
was as fortunate as it was. But now, since ex- 
perience has been gained, another year will see 
bettter cultivation, better harvesting, and a far 
better yield. A larger force, with vastly in 
creased facilities, undertake the coming crop. 
Ten farmers are already busily engaged upon 
the island, and they will cultivate not less than 
4,000 acres, mostly in wheat and barley. Ex- 
cellent dwellings and very substantial barns, 
just completed, add largely to the comfort of 
the residents and change the spacious area into 
a well-settled neighborhood. The levee is 
being enlarged, notwithstanding the successful 
resistance to the severe test of last winter's 
waters, as it is the determination of the settlers 
to make "assurance doubly sure." December 
has passed without rain, and a prosperous sea- 
son is confidently expected. Should these 
reasonable expectations be fulfilled, the tule 
lands will, during the coming season, take a 
great stride toward that high position they are 
destined to hold among the richest agricultura 
districts of our favored State. 

L. C. McAfee, Engineer. 
Staten Island, December 31, 1874. 

Mining Accident, — Workmen were engaged 
in sloping at the California mine, on Tuesday 
night, when, without warning, they struck 
through into the old Illinois works, and were 
instantly flooded with the water which was 
penned up in those works. The men all rushed 
to get through the tunnel and succeeded in doing 
so without injury, except Mr. Herrihausen, who 
escaped with some severe injuries about the 
head and shoulders. Tbe tools, cars, etc., 
which were used by the employe's were left in 
the stopes, and are probably covered up with 
the sediment and other debris from the old 
works. The accident resulted very fortunately. 
It is a wonder that every man was not drowned 
or bruised to death by the rushing torrent of 
water which was let loose by breaking the wall 
separating the works. — Nevada Transcript. 

Arizona Mines. — The Arizona Citizen sayst 
At no time in the history of Pima county, has 
mining operations been so numerous and full 
of encouragement. We have an article pre- 
pared showing in detail many facts, but it goes 
over for the present. 

In Yavapai, the condition is much the same. 
Within a few days Mr. C. P. Crawford has ap- 
plied for survey for patents to six copoer mines 
Eugene E. Bariingame for two, and C. M. 
Shannon and B. M. Hughes for one, in Yavapai 
county at Clifton, and very soon we are told 
applications for survey of about 10 more will 
be made. 



banking; and financial. 



Gold, Legal Tenders, Exchange, Etc. 

iCorrected Weekly by Charles Sutro & Co.] 

Sam Francisco, Thursday, Jan. 14, 1875. 

Legal Tenders in S. F., 11 a. m., 89 to 89,^. 

Gold Bars, 880. Silver Bars, 3 per cent discount, 
Mexican Dollars, \% and 2 per cent, discount. 

Exchange on N. Y., 6-10 per cent, premium for eold; 
Currency, IS per cent. On London— Bankers, 49!$; Com- 
mercial, 50. Paris, 5 francs per dollar. 

London— Consols, 92>£ to 92%; Bonds, 90%; Liverpool 
Whe»tSs, 7<1. to 10s. fid. 

Quicksilver in S. F., by the flask, per lb, $1.50 



The Stockton "Woolen Mills, says the Inde- 
pendent, constitute one of the best managed and 
most useful industries in Stockton. Forty 
thousand dollars is invested in the business. 
There are 25 employed, to whom $1,000 wages 
is paid per month. During 1874 the mills con- 
sumed 20,000 pounds of wool. The manufac- 
tured goods during the same period consisted 
of 75,000 yards of flannel and 7,500 pairs of 
blankets. Total value of manufactures, $75,000 



The Merchants' Exchange Bank 

OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital, One Million Dollars. 

0. W. KELLOGG ..President, 

H.F.HASTINGS Manager. 

R.N. VAN BRUNT Oashier. 

BANKING HOUSE, 
No. '428 California street, San Francisco. 



Kountse Brothers, Bankers, 

12 WALL STREET, NEW YORK, 

Allow interest at the rate of Four per cent, upoa 
daily balances of Gold and Currency. 

Receive consignments of Gold, Silver and Lead 
Bullion, and make Cash advances thereon. 

Invite Correspondence from Bankers, Mining 
Companies, Merchants and Smelting Works. 



French Savings and Loan Society, 

411 BuBh street, above Kearny SAN FRANCISCO 

4v27tf GK MAHE, Director. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Pioneer Land and Loan Association. 

Bank of Savings and Deposit. No 405 California Street, 
Opposite Bank of California. Incorporated, 1869. 
Guarantee Fund, $2(10,000. The Eightieth Dividend 
■will be paid on the 5th of February. Deposits in Gold, 
Silver and IT. S. Currency received, and interest paid in 
the same. Certificates of Deposit and Pass Books Is- 
sued, payable at ten days' notice, bearing ten per cent, 
per annum. Ordinary Deposits, payable without no- 
tice, nine per cent, per annum. Term Deposits receive 
twelve per cent. Reports can be obtained at the Bank. 

This incorporation is* in its seventh year, and refers 
to over two thousand and one hundred depositors for 
its economical and successful management, thereby 
securing the full amount of interest earned. No charge 
for entrance fees or pass books. Bank open from 9 
a. m. to 6 p. m. On Saturday evenings until 9. 

Money to loan on approved securities. 

First-class Fire and Burglar-Proof Vaults for the safe- 
keeping of Treasure, Special Deposits and Trust Funds, 
Bonds, Silverplate, etc. 

H. KOFAHL, Cashier. 

THOS. GHAT, President. 

J. O. DUNCAN, Secretary. 3-v29-3m 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

California Savings and Loan Society, 

512 California Street, San Francisco, have declared a 
dividend of nine and six-tenthB (9 G-10) per cent, per 
annum on Term Deposit* and eight (8) per cent, per 
annum on Ordinary Deposits, for the half year ending 
31st December, 1874, free from Federal Tax, and paya- 
ble on and after Wednesday, 6th January, 1875. By 
order, 
3-v29-lm D. B. CHISHOLM, Secretary. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

San Francisco Savings Union, 532 

California Street, Cor. Webb, for the half year ending 
with December 31st, 1874, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of nine (9) per cent, per annum on Term 
Deposits, and seven and one-half t733) per cent, on Or- 
dinary Deposits, free of Federal Tax, payable on and 
after January 13th, 1875. By order, 
3-v29-lm LOVELL WHITE, Cashier. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Bank of the Western Savings and 

Trust Co., San Francisco, Jan. 4th, 1875. Depositors' 
Dividend — The Directors of this 'Corporation have this 
day declared the semi-annual dividend, at the rate of 
ten {10} per cent, per annum on Term Deposits and 
eight (8) per cent, on Ordinary Deposits, payable on 
and after January 10th, 1875, at the office of the Bank, 
northeast corner of Post and Kearny streetB. 

F- CLAY. 
Vice-President and Cashier. 
H. J. BOOTH, President. 3-v9-lm 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The Farmers' and Mechanics' Bank of 

SAVINGS have declared a Dividend for the half year 
ending December 31, 1874, at the rate of ten per cent, 
per annum on term, eight per cent, per annum on class 
one ordinary, and six per cent per annum on clasB two 
ordinary deposits, payable on and after January 15th, 
1875. By order G. M. CONDER, Cashier. 
3y9-lm-bp 



Diamond Drill Co. 

The undersigned, owners of LESCHOT'S PATENT 
for DIAMOND POINTED DRILLS, now brought to the 
highest state of perfection, are prepared to nil orders 
for the IMPROVED PROSPECTING and TUNNELING 
DRILLS, with or without power, at Bhort notice, and 
at reduced prices Abundant testimony furnished of 
the great economy and successful working of numerouB 
machines in operation in the quartz and gravel mines 
on this coast. Circulars forwarded, and full informa- 
tion given upon application. 

A. J. SEVERANCE & CO. 

Office, No. 315 Oalifornia street, RoomB 16 and 17. 

24v26-tf 



NONPAREIL OIL. 

140 Degrees Fire Test, for Family TJse. 

OWNERS OF MILLS AND MANUFACTORIES, your 
attention is particularly called to this beautiful and 
safe Illuminating Oil. Its use is urgently recom- 
mended by the New York Fire Commissioners and In- 
surance Companies. For sale to tbe trade In lots to 
BUit. A. HATWARD, 224 Oalifornia St. 

19v28-3m 



January 23, 1875.] 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



59 



Machinery. 



Facittc Machinery Depot. 
H. P. GREGORY, 

Kmplrr Warvhome. Beit »t. near Market, 8 F. 




Sole A Kent for Pacific Coast for J. A. Fay A Oo'a Wnod- 

workine Machinery, Blake's Pa'cat 8leam Pnmpi. 

Tanlt« Co'* Emery Wheel* and Maohinerv. Pitch- 

bur* Machine Co's Machinist's Tools. Edson's 

Recordirifi Steam Gauge, Trinmpr, Fir© Ex- 

tin«utfiher. Also on hand and for Snle: 

eturtCTnnt'B Bowers and Exhauct Fins, John A. Roeb- 

lln n Ron*' Wire Rope, Pnre Oak Tanned Leather 

Bating. Pyrin's French Band Saw Blades, 

Planer Knives Nathan A Dreyfus Glass 

Oiler*, and Mill and Mining Supplies 

of all kind". P. O. Rox lfi£ 



MACHINISTS' TOOLS, 




ExxitA Heavy and Impboved Patterns, 
PUTNAM MACHINE CO., 

Manufactubeb. 

LATHE8, PLANERS, BORING MILLS, DRILLS, 
BOLT CUTTERS, DOUBLE NUT TAPPING 
MACHINES, SLOTTING AND SHAPING 
MACHINES ON HAND. GEAR 
CUTTERS AND MILLING 
MACHINES A SPEC- 
IALTY. 
Address 

PARKE & LACY, 

310 California Street, S. F. 



BALL'S 

SWEEPING DREDGE, 

A NEW AND VALUABLE 

CALIFORNIA INVENTION, 

Has been very lately well proven by per- 
forming- a job of dredglne at the mouth of 
San Antonio Creek, at Oakland, Cal. 

Tfaero is but this one machine that has ever had these 
improvements employed. It is an old machine, for- 
merly built for another device, and is unfavorably con- 
structed for Ball's improvements; yet this first tempo- 
rary experimental machine has filled a scow of efghty- 
flve cubic yards in sixteen minutes in unfavorable dig- 
ging. For durability, digging hard material and fast 
work, it has a reputation {supported by leading engi- 
neers) as having no equal. 

Testimonials and references will be given on appli- 
cation to the inventor